Is it my duty to buy a 1911?


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msrfrog
June 21, 2012, 11:32 PM
I am waiting on my cc permit so naturally I have been doing nothing except browsing everything handgun. I know my first gun is going to be a sr22 just to have cheap ammo and can shoot it in my yard for plenty of practice. Then probably a .380 or 9mm or maybe .40. Well I'll just be honest, I will bet that I will end up with one of each.:D
But what the heck is it about 1911's that are so alluring? I just know that I will end up with one and do not know why. I do not feel I need a 45 or a full size gun. Is it the classic lines and simple beauty? It just seems like you must have one in your collection if you have hand guns. What has attracted all you guys to the 1911?

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Zeke Markham
June 21, 2012, 11:38 PM
They are simple, elegant, very easy to shoot, and very easy to carry concealed. And you don't have to get one in 45.

Bmont2409
June 21, 2012, 11:43 PM
Try going to a range that rents handguns and try out a lot of different ones before deciding what to buy, unless of course you have a lot of money to buy guns with. I bought my first 1911 about a year ago, the second one last November and am looking at another one now. The trigger's and the ergonomics are what makes me really love them, besides there are countless accessories you can customize yours to look like you want it to. My EDC is a Sig 238 and it is somewhat similar to a baby 1911 as far as controls go and I love it. Also have a couple of 22 pistols for cheap shooting and ended up buying reloading equip so I could shoot the 45, 40, 9, 357, and 380 cheaper. It is a fun and satisfying hobby so have fun.:)

theQman23
June 21, 2012, 11:47 PM
yes it is your duty to buy one. And the 9, and the 38, and the 40.......... yes, one of each is your duty.

Seriously.

chuckpro
June 21, 2012, 11:50 PM
I felt the same way and bought a Springfield !911 and wont get rid of it. That benign said, it hardly ever makes it to the range. It is a great gun and good design for being 100 years old. But if you didn't qualify with it in the military or have any other sentimental reason to purchase one i would look at other ways to sped your money. I have several 45's and if you can find an old 220 for cheep i would pick it up they are nice guns. If you are wanting to spend some money , i love my HK45C with LEM. it is a little costly but IMHO it is blows away the 1911. but so does the 220 and usp. The best advise i can give you is go out ant shoot one before you buy one, some (no allot) of people really like them.

GMAN26
June 22, 2012, 12:33 AM
Absolutely....yes....then customize the crap put if it....make it yours.

Auto426
June 22, 2012, 12:38 AM
Buy one if you feel attracted to them. That's what I did, and it was love at first shot. You may find out like several of us have that they can be very addicting.

I know my first gun is going to be a sr22 just to have cheap ammo and can shoot it in my yard for plenty of practice.

You might want to check your local laws first. There are more than a few places that have laws against discharging firearms within a set distance of a residence or other certain areas.

HDCamel
June 22, 2012, 12:41 AM
What has attracted all you guys to the 1911?

It's difficult to put into words, but I will try...

The 1911 is the perfect blend of form and function.

From an artistic standpoint, the lines and curves of the 1911 are very gentle. Not simply in profile, but from all directions. There are no (or very few) abrubt changes in angle. Everything feels deliberate. The lines are more akin to the revolvers it replaced, giving it an elegant appearance compared to the more boxy modern offerings of Glock, HK, Sig Sauer, etc. Even the venerable Hi-Power has more of a boxy, cobbled-together appearance. It's aesthetic qualities have never gone out of style like 20" AR-15s or wood-stocked hunting rifles.

From an engineering standpoint, I love that the pistol can be easily detail stripped and re-assembled without tools. I love how the entire gun is basically held together by the tension from the recoil spring. I love how all of the parts feel more like they fall into place rather than being put into place.
100 years of testing in the hands of millions of people have shown that the 1911 is a very functional, very reliable design. The fact that it does so without sacrificing aesthetics is something that is truly remarkable.

To put it another way, over these past 100 years the 1911 has always been stylish and always gotten the job done. To my knowledge, only one other thing can make such a claim...

the trenchcoat.

RBid
June 22, 2012, 07:52 AM
I may get one, after an M&P9c, Ruger Mini 14, EAA Witness P Carry, CZ 75b, FN FNX 9, BHP, Walther P99AS, a second Walther PPQ, a 'baby, take me back!' card (after my lady puts her foot down), and ... whatever else I'm forgetting :)

This is an expensive passion!

Johnny Lightning
June 22, 2012, 08:33 AM
I have glocks, a revolver, .22, and my 1911.....nothing brings a smile like when shooting the 1911! The 1911 trigger is the best out of any other handgun I have shot and the accuracy is amazing! I think you are doing yourself an injustice by not at least shooting a 1911 rental to see if you like them. I also like the ability to customize the 1911 and make it yours.

khegglie
June 22, 2012, 08:47 AM
Yes.... It is your duty to buy a 1911 type OR TWO!

19-3Ben
June 22, 2012, 08:47 AM
I just know that I will end up with one and do not know why. I do not feel I need a 45 or a full size gun.

Well, put it on your list if you want it, but it doesn't have to be at the top.
I have to say, I've owned guns for about 6 years now. I've been through my share of pistols and have yet to own a 1911. I've shot them. I like them. (first one I ever shot was a Wilson CQB that spoiled the heck outta me!) But from a practical standpoint I just haven't come up on a niche that the 1911 fills that isn't already filled by some of my other pistols. A high quality one is beautiful to behold, and they do shoot darn nicely.
I just know that if I got a hankering for a single stack, steel .45acp right now, I'd take a S&W 4566/4506 over a 1911 any day of the week and twice on Thursday. If I wanted polymer it'd be the M&P45.
So to answer your question... is it your duty? No. Are they nice to have? Yes. So for me it's on the list, but pretty far down.

I know many people will disagree with me on this. What can I say, I'm odd.

AFDavis11
June 22, 2012, 08:59 AM
There are certain guns that are iconic. Not only do we get pleasure from shooting them, but also from simply owning them. As far as I'm concerned both these requirements are essential.

2wheels
June 22, 2012, 09:11 AM
It's hard to put my love affair with 1911s into words... A 1911 was my first gun at 19, and I've loved them ever since. They look great, they feel great, they shoot great (single action triggers are so awesome), they even conceal great because they're nice and slim.

Plus, for whatever reason I feel better being called a 1911 fanboy than a Glock fanboy :)

Nobody said you've got to get a full sized steel frame .45 1911. My main carry piece is a subcompact alloy framed 9mm 1911, it's the sweetest little carry gun I've ever had the pleasure to shoot.

msrfrog
June 22, 2012, 11:27 AM
Buy one if you feel attracted to them. That's what I did, and it was love at first shot. You may find out like several of us have that they can be very addicting.



You might want to check your local laws first. There are more than a few places that have laws against discharging firearms within a set distance of a residence or other certain areas.
I can shoot where I live . I just do not want to practice with larger louder calibers and disturb my neighbor. I live in the woods.

Skribs
June 22, 2012, 11:29 AM
I'm a big proponent of the KISS principle. I used to want one of everything, then I wanted similar MOA but in several different calibers. Now, I'm down to a plan to only get 3 basic models: Full-size handgun, compact handgun of the otherwise same model (both in 9mm), and .223 carbine. So I don't buy into the whole "it's your duty to own 9, 40, 45, .357 sig, .357 magnum, and at least one each of Glock, 1911, CZ, Sig, and Hi Power."

Get what works for you, get what you like the looks of (and if it turns out not to be fun to shoot, make it a range queen), get what lets you practice, and get what's fun to shoot. Personally, for me, similar MOA is what works for me, is fun, and I'm not too big on aesthetics.

msrfrog
June 22, 2012, 11:38 AM
I may get one, after an M&P9c, Ruger Mini 14, EAA Witness P Carry, CZ 75b, FN FNX 9, BHP, Walther P99AS, a second Walther PPQ, a 'baby, take me back!' card (after my lady puts her foot down), and ... whatever else I'm forgetting :)

This is an expensive passion!
All hobbies are expensive! lol... as my wife knows. I have sunk over $3500 in a coral reef tank, then there was the exotic frogs,?$$$$ into nitro r/c cars and trucks and electric helicopters,the driving wheel set up for my ps3 grand turismo game and fishing.
I feel the gun hobby is the most useful. They do not break every time I use them like r/c's do. And have a function besides fun in case of emergency. Also for the guns I like it will not really break the bank. I have less than $500 in my 10/22 and I love it.

Gtimothy
June 22, 2012, 12:17 PM
Yes it is your duty to buy or even better, build one! It's a blast buying the individual components, fitting them together and having a fully functioning piece of history! Some parts do require some fitting but it's WELL worth the effort if you have the mechanical ability!

Dr.Mall Ninja
June 22, 2012, 12:40 PM
My first handgun was a 1911 then sold it. I have bought and sold.a few more handguns after that including a hk usp. Now that I got another 1911 I'm never going without one again.

Yo Mama
June 22, 2012, 12:47 PM
Understand first that the 1911 is single action only, and read about the different carry conditions 1-2-3.

If you're ok with this, there is no good reason other than money to stop you from getting one.

msrfrog
June 22, 2012, 01:01 PM
Being a auto tech, building one seems pretty cool. Any links on where to get all the different parts?

JTQ
June 22, 2012, 01:52 PM
msrfrog wrote,
Being a auto tech, building one seems pretty cool. Any links on where to get all the different parts?
This maybe a worthwhile article for you to read.

http://how-i-did-it.org/1911-project/index.html

labhound
June 22, 2012, 01:57 PM
No gun collection is complete without a 1911. :) I would suggest buying a new one with a reliable reputation as your first one because if you buy or build one that doesn't function properly it'll turn you off the 1911's real quick. :banghead: Nothing shoots sweeter that a well functioning 1911 .45ACP!

Fishslayer
June 22, 2012, 01:59 PM
I don't know about "duty" but it is an irrefutable universal truth that every American should own a 1911 in .45ACP (None of that metric euro stuff) and a .357 Magnum wheelgun.

That's just the way it is. ;)

Skribs
June 22, 2012, 02:06 PM
No gun collection is complete without a 1911.
I don't know about "duty" but it is an irrefutable universal truth that every American should own a 1911 in .45ACP (None of that metric euro stuff) and a .357 Magnum wheelgun.

So, because I plan on having only 9mm PFSF pistols and .223 ARs, I'm suddenly incomplete as a shooter? I really don't like statements such as "every person needs to have ____ in their collection." I'm not pushing everyone else to get a Glock in their collection, I don't see any reason for others to push the "requirement" to have X, Y, and Z in mine.

patriot9879
June 22, 2012, 02:19 PM
I don't think Fishslayer's comment was meant to be all that serious. There are pro's and con's to any design. My opinion is that no American gun collection is complete without a 1911. Unfortunately, there are few of us that are collectors, especially when just getting started.

Skylerbone
June 22, 2012, 02:25 PM
It's no ones responsibility to own any firearm he or she finds objectionable, over-priced, antiquated, heavy or otherwise useless. That is a summary some use in describing the 1911 and I pity them for it, though not as much as the man who lacks a rimfire rifle.

Utility, good looks and reliability need not be mutually exclusive and some 1911s demonstrate that point. Same with revolvers, rifles, polymers, shotguns...

Skribs
June 22, 2012, 02:38 PM
Well, my comment wasn't aimed at any one person, but whenever the subject of "do I NEED this" or "what guns should everyone have", I feel like my philosophy of KISS, single platform for pistols, single platform for long guns, becomes the enemy. My purposes are utilitarian in function, not for a collection, but a lot of people come across that "you don't have real collection unless..." or "you're not real shooter if you don't have..."

The most common things that come up, from what I see, are 1911, .357 revolver, and a .22 rifle. None of those fit my needs, so I don't see a reason for me to have them, and I don't like the idea of people thinking I'm less of a shooter because of it.

Creature
June 22, 2012, 02:51 PM
In my opinion, the 1911 is not the pinnacle of pistol design. I have owned several. I even carried a 1911 for more than half a decade. Sold all but two of them off. One is a family piece and the other I have just sunk too much money in to it for me to sell off just yet.

Once the blinders came off, I realised that they are heavy, offer limited ammo capacity and the quality of available brands is all over the map. Finicky when tight, nor very accurate when loose. They are just too expensive and labor intensive to make truly reliable 1911. There are far too many better modern design pistols to justify their cost.

And to answer your silly question; no, it is not your duty to buy a 1911.

labhound
June 22, 2012, 03:58 PM
Skribs my comment about "No gun collection is complete without a 1911." included the humorous smiley face :) and was directed toward the OP with humor because he asked "Is it my duty to buy a 1911". I don't believe anyone was commenting on your status as a shooter or your gun collection. I personally don't own a .40 S&W, Glock or a .223, but who cares. If KISS works for you, great, different levels of KISS work for all of us. Buy what fits your needs or desires.

Skribs
June 22, 2012, 04:03 PM
Labhound, like I said, it was the general attitude of many posters across many threads that has made me start to despise the question "what X guns should every shooter have" or similar derivatives of that.

labhound
June 22, 2012, 04:45 PM
Skribs I understand your feelings. I usually try to avoid the threads on "9mm vs .40 S&W vs .45ACP", "Glock vs anything", "Striker vs Hammer", "Polymer vs Metal", "Iron sights vs Lasers", "Thumb safety vs no thumb safety" and so on, I'm sure you know what I mean. To many people have attitudes set in stone, maybe with good reason, maybe not. I never thought I'd like a 1911 till I rented one which led me to buying one. I've never shot a .40 S&W caliber gun of any brand, never shot a Glock of any caliber, any probably won't own one of these, but you never know. If I try it I may like it. As far as KISS goes, my needs are actually one pistol for SD and HD. My other pistols, shot gun, and .22lr rifle I own are all just "wants" with maybe just a little self proclaimed "need" just to justify to myself buying them. :) My only problem is finding time to shoot everything I own. :eek:

X-Rap
June 22, 2012, 04:45 PM
Once the blinders came off, I realised that they are heavy, offer limited ammo capacity and the quality of available brands is all over the map. Finicky when tight, nor very accurate when loose. They are just too expensive and labor intensive to make truly reliable 1911. There are far too many better modern design pistols to justify their cost.


best reply of the thread IMO, I have had quite a few and still have 3 but they are by no means a go to gun except for the Raptor with the 22 conversion for rodents around the place.

Mike OTDP
June 22, 2012, 04:53 PM
Do you want one? Need one? If not, spend your money elsewhere. I'm hip-deep in pistols of various types, but only own three 1911-pattern guns. A 1911 for bullseye, a S&W 945, and a Sistema Colt that I may have reworked into a hardball gun.

My real delight are very high end target pistols. Hammerlis in particular, but I'm not prejudiced - I own Morinis, a Walther, and a Toz-35M, too. Not to mention a long laundry list of muzzle-loaders.

Fishslayer
June 22, 2012, 05:36 PM
Skribs my comment about "No gun collection is complete without a 1911." included the humorous smiley face :) and was directed toward the OP with humor because he asked "Is it my duty to buy a 1911".

He missed the ;) on my post, too. Some people just refuse to chuckle at anything...

MICHAEL T
June 22, 2012, 06:03 PM
Its you duty and right as a American to own a 1911 . Just as your duty to vote in nov.

make sure you do both.

Double_J
June 22, 2012, 06:03 PM
Why buy a 1911 when you can go with style and class, go for a high power, lol. I know I will get flamed for this but a high power offers better ergonomics, more ammo capacity, and you will have the luxury of owning one of the finest fighting handguns ever made.

For the record I do own both a high power and a 1911, and I have no problem carrying either of them. I find the high power is easier to carry and much more comfortable to carry iwb, but I like the 1911 when I OC. Honestly I would find one or two guns that I can carry and shoot VERY well, then I would buy something that might be a range toy. If you do end up with a 1911 as an everyday carry piece so be it, but make sure you can shoot it well and that you practice with it until you know it cold. They tend to be finicky pieces of machinery from a bygone age of hand-fitting everything so keep that in mind (the high power is not quite as bad on the hand fitting, most all of the parts I have found are drop-in or minor fitting required, almost ALL the 1911 parts require fitting by a gunsmith).

The choice is yours, buy it if and when YOU want, not because you feel obligated to.

Skribs
June 22, 2012, 06:12 PM
Why buy a 1911 when you can go with style and class

How'd I know, at this point, that you weren't going to suggest Glock?

ApacheCoTodd
June 22, 2012, 07:01 PM
Yes, yes it is your duty in the vein of assisting in continuing the line and expanding the "gene pool" of 1911 development and modification.

Sergei Mosin
June 22, 2012, 07:06 PM
HDCamel has described well the aesthetic and engineering attraction of the 1911. I would also add that the 1911 is the All-American pistol (with a nod to the Single Action Army aficionados.) If you think of the arms of the American fighting man of the 20th century, the 1911 immediately comes to mind. It was his constant companion through four major wars and countless skirmishes around the world and is still there on the front lines today.

kyletx1911
June 22, 2012, 07:33 PM
Clint eastwood, the duke, bronson, lee marvin, hell even jim brown( just had to do it )
Says yes you must have a 1911

psyshack
June 22, 2012, 07:52 PM
It is not your Duty to purchase a 1911 anything. Many of us own one, or many. But the is no, " I'm a hand gunner there for I must own a 1911 creed " And if anybody tells you, you have a duty to own and shoot a 1911. It's time they were taken to a dark corner of a barn and taught a lesson. :)

houstsx
June 22, 2012, 08:02 PM
I'm a big proponent of the KISS principle. I used to want one of everything, then I wanted similar MOA but in several different calibers. Now, I'm down to a plan to only get 3 basic models: Full-size handgun, compact handgun of the otherwise same model (both in 9mm), and .223 carbine. So I don't buy into the whole "it's your duty to own 9, 40, 45, .357 sig, .357 magnum, and at least one each of Glock, 1911, CZ, Sig, and Hi Power."

Get what works for you, get what you like the looks of (and if it turns out not to be fun to shoot, make it a range queen), get what lets you practice, and get what's fun to shoot. Personally, for me, similar MOA is what works for me, is fun, and I'm not too big on aesthetics.

I'm with you on this. I currently have a XD9 (fullsize 9mm) PM9 (compact 9mm) and VEPR AK (7.62x39 carbine). The rest of my guns are all .22's. It's a good setup that will get near anything done. The only thing I feel i'm missing is a 12g shotgun.

There are hundreds of guns I would love to own but knowing that I already have what I need makes it easy to say no when a good deal comes by.

JTQ
June 22, 2012, 08:32 PM
Is it my duty to buy a 1911?
No. Lots of people just don't get the 1911, and it's possible you are one of them. I don't want to try and convince you to get one, only to have you whine about how heavy it is, or how low the capacity is, or "I'm so afraid of this Condition 1 stuff with the hammer cocked and isn't it safer to carry it in Condition 2", or why do I have to put oil on it, why is this .45ACP ammo so expensive, etc.

Some "get" the 1911 and they want one. They know it has limitations, since no pistol is perfect, but accept those limitations because the things they like about them out weigh the negatives. Some others don't "get" the 1911, such as ...
Creature,
I realised that they are heavy, offer limited ammo capacity and the quality of available brands is all over the map. Finicky when tight, nor very accurate when loose. They are just too expensive and labor intensive to make truly reliable 1911. There are far too many better modern design pistols to justify their cost.
and that's OK. There are other pistols for him or maybe even you. Get what you like, but I'm not going to try and convince you it's the pistol for you. Either you get it or you don't.

psyshack
June 22, 2012, 09:00 PM
I own one 1911. It's a Korean War Colt Pistol born in 1944. Thought two years ago coming up on 2011 I should go buy myself a new 1911 built to the old WWII Specs. With money in pocket I went shopping. I ended up buying a M&P FS .45. Every 1911 other the the Asian produced models were way over priced! And the so called custom or match grade pistols cost way to much. Insane pricing for a tight ass pistol that will fail in a Okie dust storm. And you dam sure couldn't carry them if you were out noodling for catfish in the muck, myer, mess and mud.

But thats just me.... :)

Creature
June 22, 2012, 09:21 PM
JTQ wrote: Get what you like, but I'm not going to try and convince you it's the pistol for you. Either you get it or you don't

Did you even read the first half of my post? I was a dyed-in-the-wool aficionado of the 1911. But I took the blinders off...and have never looked back at the 1911. The 1911 is not the only pistol out there...maybe one day you'll come to the same realization I did.

YankeeFlyr
June 23, 2012, 12:26 AM
No. Even if Chuck Norris says to...

But I like mine! :)

Girodin
June 23, 2012, 02:44 AM
I think everyone should own a 1911. I absolutely love them. However, I rarely recommend it as someones first gun or primary self defense weapon.

To me the 1911 is like a tuner car. When it is put together right and dialed in it is just so much more satisfying than a Honda accord or the like. It is also more money and more work than just going to the Honda dealership and driving away in a car. Further, if you don't like being under the hood of the car, keeping it maintained, and being informed about them, tuner cars can just be a pain and much less practical.

beatledog7
June 23, 2012, 07:10 AM
The notion that every collector or shooter must have any particular gun to be "whole" is fallacious.

Must every collector of baseball cards have a pristine Sandy Koufax rookie card? If no collection is complete without one, then most collections will remain forever incomplete.

Must every collector of automobiles boast an all original, unrestored '57 Bel Air? They had better hope not, since there are not enough to go around.

Part of the reason there are so many 1911-design guns out there is this idea that everyone must have one. It's brilliant marketing. It's also why there is such wide variance in the quality of said 1911-design guns in various calibers and at various price points.

I do not own a 1911, nor have I done very much serious "which-to-buy" research on them. At this moment, I can't see any reason why I need one.

If I were to own one someday, I would first have to decide if it's to fill the role of "collection" piece or a regular shooter. If a collection piece, then it would have to be a "real" 1911 made by one of military contractors during the time when said contracts were in place, and it would have to have some documented provenance. If a regular shooter, then those things wouldn't matter at all, and my selection criteria would focus wholly on how it shoots.

For now, I'm content to not own a 1911-design pistol.

tarosean
June 23, 2012, 07:29 AM
No,

but some people need to lay off the coffee!!

beatledog7
June 23, 2012, 07:51 AM
tarosean, I haven't had enough coffee yet!

PabloJ
June 23, 2012, 07:55 AM
I am waiting on my cc permit so naturally I have been doing nothing except browsing everything handgun. I know my first gun is going to be a sr22 just to have cheap ammo and can shoot it in my yard for plenty of practice. Then probably a .380 or 9mm or maybe .40. Well I'll just be honest, I will bet that I will end up with one of each.:D
But what the heck is it about 1911's that are so alluring? I just know that I will end up with one and do not know why. I do not feel I need a 45 or a full size gun. Is it the classic lines and simple beauty? It just seems like you must have one in your collection if you have hand guns. What has attracted all you guys to the 1911?
I would buy Glock, HK, XD or M&P instead of grandpas 1911.

tarosean
June 23, 2012, 08:14 AM
tarosean, I haven't had enough coffee yet!

wasnt talking about you....:)

HKGuns
June 23, 2012, 09:37 AM
Are you merican? If so, then yes it is your duty at some point. It is not a requirement to buy it as your first pistol though.

JTQ
June 23, 2012, 09:50 AM
Creature wrote,
Did you even read the first half of my post? I was a dyed-in-the-wool aficionado of the 1911. But I took the blinders off...and have never looked back at the 1911. The 1911 is not the only pistol out there...maybe one day you'll come to the same realization I did.
I read your whole post. Which is why I wrote
Some "get" the 1911 and they want one. They know it has limitations, since no pistol is perfect, but accept those limitations because the things they like about them out weigh the negatives.
Every pistol has some limitation. To the many, many, thousands (millions?) of 1911 users, they understand those limitations, but feel the positive points of the 1911 outweigh the shortcomings. Most don't have "blinders on", and have used other pistols that have their own particular features and shortcomings, and have settled on the 1911, because they "get it".

Conversely, there are lots of pistols people love that I don't get. I don't have any animosity towards those pistols, those people, or their choice in pistols. I don't denigrate them or their pistols. I let them choose what they like and I choose what I like. I'm not going to try an convince you you need a 1911, since only you know what you like.

Creature
June 23, 2012, 06:34 PM
Are you merican? If so, then yes it is your duty at some point.
Seriously...please someone explain how the devil it is one's "duty" to purchase/own a 1911!

76shuvlinoff
June 23, 2012, 08:06 PM
I think everyone should own a 1911 but is it their duty? No.

It is their duty to put a 100 rounds though one before they talk crap about them.

I'm afraid that policy would seriously limit post counts though.


:evil:


.

msrfrog
June 23, 2012, 09:02 PM
Wow my most popular thread!lol
1. I chose duty for lack of a better word off the top of my head.
2. In my post I stated my 1st pistol will be sr22.
3. I will not whine about it being heavy.
4. I am very mechanically inclined and can fix/maintain just about anything
5. It will not be my carry gun , just to have and shoot.
girodin
I think everyone should own a 1911. I absolutely love them. However, I rarely recommend it as someones first gun or primary self defense weapon.

To me the 1911 is like a tuner car. When it is put together right and dialed in it is just so much more satisfying than a Honda accord or the like. It is also more money and more work than just going to the Honda dealership and driving away in a car. Further, if you don't like being under the hood of the car, keeping it maintained, and being informed about them, tuner cars can just be a pain and much less practical.

good point

afdavis11
There are certain guns that are iconic. Not only do we get pleasure from shooting them, but also from simply owning them. As far as I'm concerned both these requirements are essential.

iconic that is the right word!
I do not want a shiny dazzling safe queen. I like functional stuff that I am not worried about scratching , using or whatever.

This is just a thread in a forum lighten up.
ps. Why would I get a glock? If I wanted a ugly gun I would buy a hi-point.hahahahaha:evil:

NG VI
June 23, 2012, 09:08 PM
To the OP-

Hell no.

msrfrog
June 23, 2012, 09:31 PM
to the op-

hell no.


"the les baer 1911 feels like a man's tool, no doubt about it.
...you may want to re-word that

lmfao

NG VI
June 24, 2012, 12:47 AM
Yeah.

Buy whatcha want.

Not whatcha think you have some obligation to.

Unless you signed a contract somewhere saying you'll get a 1911, if you aren't interested in them, why get one?

Though I ended up liking Glocks in general after buying a 27 because I thought it was the best fit for what I wanted.

CmdrSlander
June 24, 2012, 03:51 PM
It is your duty to buy several. And give at least one to me :)

Skylerbone
June 24, 2012, 05:06 PM
The 1911 holds no secrets from a well trained pistolsmith. Materials, angles, dimensions, spring weights and tolerances being correct are what allow a 1911 to run well. The same can be said of any firearm. A Glock 19 cannot function properly if its owner tries stuffing a 1911 magazine in it or using an XD barrel.

It's a shame what has become of the 1911's reputation but I stand firm in my belief that if built correctly a 1911 needs only a bit of lubrication, functional springs and occasional cleaning to operate reliably. Yes they cost more. No, they don't appeal to everyone. It may not be your duty but if you enjoy handguns you owe it to yourself to try a good example for yourself. Buying a cheap, poorly made example is likened to buying an '85 Chevette then swearing off the automobile.

orionengnr
June 24, 2012, 08:52 PM
If the design appeals to you, then buy one. Be aware that so many people are building them that some are not doing the best job...

I really like 1911s, have owned about 30 of them in my life and carry one every day. YMMV.

jp3
August 2, 2012, 12:39 AM
Les Baer, Wilson, & Brown 5" steel 1911s typically run well. They're built and fitted correct from the get go. Money well spent if you ask me.

skoro
August 2, 2012, 08:05 AM
What has attracted all you guys to the 1911?

In my case, it's a number of things.

The M1911 was my father's sidearm in WWII and it was mine in the mid-70s during my military days. It has a very long, very good record in two world wars, Korea, and Vietnam. It's an American icon among handguns, particularly those made by Colt.

Having said all that, I really like the single action trigger and it just plain looks so cool, too.

You certainly don't have a duty to own one. Handle one, see if it fits your hand well. Fire one if possible and see if you like the way it works. If it calls to you, don't resist. If, on the other hand, you aren't all that impressed, then pass.

Handguns are certainly a personal preference. Get what works best for you. :cool:

j1
August 2, 2012, 08:09 AM
Yes, of course it is.

Creature
August 2, 2012, 08:32 AM
I am still waiting for someone....anyone...to explain why it is a duty to buy a 1911.

:confused:

snakeman
August 2, 2012, 09:19 AM
not a duty, A PRIVILEGE!

JustinJ
August 2, 2012, 09:56 AM
I'm a fan of progress an innovation so no, i feel no duty to buy a 1911. Maybe someday but there is plenty more i'd rather have.

45_auto
August 2, 2012, 10:00 AM
I am still waiting for someone....anyone...to explain why it is a duty to buy a 1911.



duty [doo-tee, dyoo-]

noun, plural duties.

1. something that one is expected or required to do by moral or legal obligation.

2. the binding or obligatory force of something that is morally or legally right; moral or legal obligation.

3. an action or task required by a person's position or occupation; function: the duties of a clergyman.

4. the respectful and obedient conduct due a parent, superior, elder, etc.

5. an act or expression of respect.

Same reason some people feel they have a duty (moral obligation) to vote, or to donate their time or money to less fortunate people, etc. It's expected of them.

Many people feel that they have a moral obligation (see def 1) to show respect (see def 5) to the memory of American's who have defended their country. What better way to do it than by owning the handgun that they used during 2 world wars, as well as many other conflicts. And to top it all off, you also own the premier fighting handgun in the world!

Snag
August 2, 2012, 10:01 AM
Maybe not a "duty" but it's one of those firearms that is a must have for many reasons.

Creature
August 2, 2012, 10:08 AM
Same reason some people feel they have a duty (moral obligation) to vote

But they in fact do not have a duty to vote.

Many people feel that they have a moral obligation (see def 1) to show respect (see def 5) to the memory of American's who have defended their country.

Yet this can be accomplished without having to purchase a 1911. As simple as standing, removing cover and placing hand over heart at the National Anthem. and/or thanking a veteran.

45_auto
August 2, 2012, 10:10 AM
But they in fact do not have a duty to vote.

How exactly are you able to determine other people's moral obligations through the internet?

Creature
August 2, 2012, 10:13 AM
Are they required by law (obligation) to vote?

As they say in Missouri: Show me.

BRE346
August 2, 2012, 10:21 AM
I think they are chiding you mostly in fun. As you learn about guns you will form your own opinion about what you like or don't like.

The 1911 ,as you surely know by now, is a historical piece and an outstanding example of handgun engineering. The Marines, or maybe the Army wanted a handgun big enough put down drug-crazed Phillopinos and this one won the competition. The military has used and loved it ever since. So now half the country equates this icon with American patriotism. So we say that every red-blooded American shooter just has to have one.

I hook it up with my service in WWII. See?

45_auto
August 2, 2012, 10:25 AM
As they say in Missouri: Show me.

Click here:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/duty

Read definition #1 of duty. It appears that you may also need to look up "moral" to understand it, since you seem to be trying to relate "duty" solely to "legal requirements (obligations)" for some reason.

Creature
August 2, 2012, 10:28 AM
Perhaps you should look up the three sources of "moral obligation"...

45_auto
August 2, 2012, 10:40 AM
Do you have problems understanding #3?

Sources of Moral Obligation

Moral obligations can arise from three sources.

1. Law-Based Moral Obligations. Good citizens have a moral as well as a legal obligation to abide by laws; it is part of the assumed social contract of a civilized society.

2. Agreement-Based Moral Obligations. The second source of moral obligation is agreement.

3. Moral Principle as the Basis of Moral Obligation. The third source of moral obligation is moral principle, a standard of conduct that exists irrespective of laws or agreements.

http://josephsoninstitute.org/business/blog/2011/02/3-sources-of-moral-obligation/

Creature
August 2, 2012, 10:49 AM
Obviously you have a problem understanding the difference between an action (the purchase of a 1911) being morally required (obligatory), others as permissible, and still others as forbidden (wrong).

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