Lead on both ends of a bullet??


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Gunnerboy
June 23, 2012, 09:37 AM
So to my understanding a proper bullet has lead exposed on only one side of it, this being a SP round with lead on the tip or a FMJ with lead on the bottom for expansion....... and i was also under the assumption that if lead was on both sides there was a possibility of the lead coming out and nothing but a copper jacket being left, so can someone explain to me why Tula cartridges 124gr SP ammo has lead exposed on both ends and why the lead just dosent come out of the jacket like so many on here have said in other threads and posts.

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Eric M
June 23, 2012, 09:48 AM
The only bullets without an exposed lead base are TMJs or bullet that don't have lead cores. I believe jackets are bonded to the core.

FROGO207
June 23, 2012, 09:56 AM
There are brands of bullet that basically have a H style heavy copper jacket that has lead in the front and back that will shoot well without leaving the jacket in the bore. Think of laying the H on it's side and swaging a lead core in both the top and bottom areas. This gives good expansion with boat tail weight retention in the back provides great bullet performance.
Nosler Partition bullets are one of these that have been available since the 50's.

Gunnerboy
June 23, 2012, 10:05 AM
^ i understand the partition style of bullet, but these Tula bullets are just a jacket with a straight lead core no partition or H.

303tom
June 23, 2012, 11:19 AM
I have been cutting & drilling on bullets for years & have never had one come apart, & yes I have heard the stories, all I can say is (I am from Missouri) ie; Show Me, picture proof............

1KPerDay
June 23, 2012, 12:48 PM
The only bullets without an exposed lead base are TMJs or bullet that don't have lead cores. I believe jackets are bonded to the core.
Actually Remington/UMC makes a "leadless" jacketed bullet with the lead in front. It's basically an FMJ but with the lead end in front and rounded to feed properly. Combined with lead-free primers and it basically eliminates airborne lead indoors.

FROGO207
June 23, 2012, 03:58 PM
Well I did not under stand your question I guess. If you take a piece of heavy walled copper gliding metal and fill it with lead using a process with flux similar to soldering to provide good bonding, swage it to the proper shape and provide a cannalure just to be sure, it will probably stay in one piece when fired. I am willing to bet that it is the cheapest way to make a semi accurate projectile with the least expensive materials if it is from Tula/Wolf. I have used soft drawn copper refrigeration tubing to make bullets and filled them with melted lead. Then swaged them to size, loaded them and shot em. I produced some wild looking .357 wad cutters that were on the light side that shot OK but were not so accurate as cast bullets IIRC. So I stopped the experiments then and there. YMMV

FIVETWOSEVEN
June 24, 2012, 12:36 AM
Actually Remington/UMC makes a "leadless" jacketed bullet with the lead in front. It's basically an FMJ but with the lead end in front and rounded to feed properly. Combined with lead-free primers and it basically eliminates airborne lead indoors.

I think the bullets flying down range would count as airborne lead. ;)

303tom
June 24, 2012, 09:26 AM
I think the bullets flying down range would count as airborne lead. ;)


O Snap................

1KPerDay
June 25, 2012, 02:54 PM
haaa! :D

I was going to type "aerosolized" but thought that might get me yelled at by some scientist-type. ;)

Jim Watson
June 27, 2012, 10:42 AM
I would be willing to bet that Tula bullets were made on Cold War FMJ tooling and the hollowpoints drilled. Let the Americans take the risk of the cores blowing through.

The cavities look small, how well do they expand on game?

Original Barnes softpoints are made out of copper tubing. The jacket bottom is rolled over so that there is only a small spot of lead exposed and nobody has complained of their cores blowing through.


I expect that the cases of cores blowing through cut FMJs happened to people who thought that if a little lead exposure at the nose was good, a lot would be better. So they cut way back and left a nearly straight tube with no ogive to hold the core in.

303tom
June 27, 2012, 11:15 AM
I would be willing to bet that Tula bullets were made on Cold War FMJ tooling and the hollowpoints drilled. Let the Americans take the risk of the cores blowing through.

The cavities look small, how well do they expand on game?

Original Barnes softpoints are made out of copper tubing. The jacket bottom is rolled over so that there is only a small spot of lead exposed and nobody has complained of their cores blowing through.


I expect that the cases of cores blowing through cut FMJs happened to people who thought that if a little lead exposure at the nose was good, a lot would be better. So they cut way back and left a nearly straight tube with no ogive to hold the core in.
YEAH, What he said..........

Gunnerboy
June 27, 2012, 11:20 AM
Thats basically what i was thinking ^ i never understood how the lead just squeezed out of the little hole in the top and left the jacket behind.

7.62 Nato
June 27, 2012, 03:43 PM
Especially with lower power rounds and longer barrels the resistance of the jacket against the bore can overcome the inertia of the round. The jacket sticks and the core seperates. Instant blockage.

Jim Watson
June 27, 2012, 09:46 PM
I saw it happen once with a .38 revolver and Speer JSPs. No through hole for gas pressure to blow the core out, the jacket just stopped from friction on a too-light load and the core kept going. It even hit the target, so the shooter fired again and bulged his barrel.

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