Lever-action .357


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beag_nut
June 27, 2012, 03:05 PM
I did a search on this forum, but didn't find any info.
So, I'm putting this out there: Looking for a current-production quality, rugged lever-action rifle in .357 Mag. Not an actual specimen, but a brand.

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dprice3844444
June 27, 2012, 03:13 PM
http://www.marlinfirearms.com/firearms/1894centerfire/1894c.asp

Striker
June 27, 2012, 03:13 PM
Here's three:

Winchester: http://www.impactguns.com/winchester-model-1892-carbine-357-mag-20in-534177137-048702119637.aspx

Marlin - http://www.impactguns.com/marlin-35738-18in-model-1894c-walnut-1894c-026495142001.aspx

Rossi - http://www.rossiusa.com/product-details.cfm?id=162&category=8&toggle=&breadcrumbseries=

Paladin7
June 27, 2012, 03:14 PM
I have a Marlin (original Marlin not a Remlin) 1894 css (Stainless Steel). It is a wonderful 357 carbine that does an amazing number of things well, from plinking, to hunting up to deer sized animals to HD. Very easy to carry in the field and a VERY fun gun to shoot and own. Very easy to disassemble and clean and very simple in its design. The ballistics on the 357 from a carbine length barrel are impressive. Also, mine digests 357s and 38s with ease. So, lots of options.

I'd highly recommend an original Marlin manufactured 1894. If you see one of the newer Remington manufactured ones, check the quality very carefully before you buy. Remington recognized that they had problems and are re-working their manufacturing to get them right. So, hopefully, they will fix what is wrong and you will have another option.

About the only thing you need with one are a good sling and peep sights.

You will absolutely love the Marlin lever action 357 carbine, its a must have.

TimboKhan
June 27, 2012, 03:14 PM
I have a Marlin 1894, and it is incredibly fun to shoot. Accurate out to 100 yards or so with iron sights. Recoil is not an issue, nor thus far is function with either .357 or .38. Or, for that matter, a mixed tube of .357 and .38. I don't know what your intended purpose for it is, but in general terms I can recommend this rifle with no real reservation.

The_Armed_Therapist
June 27, 2012, 03:24 PM
I have the Marlin 1894 in .44 mag and it's a fantastic gun for it's purposes! About a 175-yard range on mine; the .357 should do more like 200/225. It has made me a lover of lever guns, for sure! The 10-round capacity is nice, too.

pktrkt
June 27, 2012, 05:15 PM
I have an older model Marlin 94 in 44 mag and we liked it so much we went looking for a 357 model 94 and let me tell you they are extremely hard to find in our neck of the woods. After looking for months we finally setteled on a Rossi M92 in 357. Its not the quality of the old Marlin 94 but its light and does what we wanted for, plinking and short range brush gun. Wished I could find an older Marlin 94 but fairly satisified with the Rossi.

BJ Orange
June 27, 2012, 05:33 PM
the .357 should do more like 200/225

You think the effective range of an 1894C is 200 - 225 yards? Am I reading this correctly?

hogdoc357
June 27, 2012, 05:35 PM
Ditto!

MCgunner
June 27, 2012, 05:38 PM
.357 Rossi 20" carbine I've owned for 25 years. It's got 4" at 100 yards accuracy with a gas checked 165 grain Keith style SWCs over 16.8 grains Lil' Gun and 1.5" at 50 yards accuracy with 105 SWCs over 2.3 grains bullseye in .38 brass. Both bullets are cast from Lee molds. The magnum load shoots at just under 1900 fps, the .38 load at 900 fps. It's like having a .22 and a .30-30 in one gun. :D I installed a ghost ring sight with click adjustable elevation. Just run the elevation up for .38s, down for magnums. Very versatile little carbine and, to my eye, it looks better than a Marlin. :D Traditional 92 action (very strong) with oil rubbed walnut stock. I thought I had a picture, but I can't find it.

.357 is a 100 yard carbine. Let's not get carried away.

The_Armed_Therapist
June 27, 2012, 06:08 PM
BJ Orange... I meant that around 200/225, the bullet drop is too significant to, practically, use for hunting. With my .44mag, the maximum point blank range is about 150 yards. I can do 6" groups @ 150. Nothing special, but effective. Once I hit 200 yards, though, the bullet drop isn't a few inches, but more like a foot and with 8-10" with an exponentially steeper decrease in performance past 200. If I were to use the rifle for deer, for example, I'd not want to take a 200 yard shot.

I'm somewhat assuming that the same would apply with the .357 version, except with a little more distance. Hence, 175 for hunting with the .44 and 200/225 for hunting with the .357 (honestly not sure if the .357 is used for hunting or not...).

Above all, I was just describing the performance of my rifle with my average abilities. I don't necessarily know all the correct terms for this stuff, but I hope this explained myself.

Edited: I just looked up "effective range" and if you were referring to the .357's ability to kill, then yes I would agree that it's LOOONG past 200/225 yards. I just meant for practicality based on the abilities of the rifle to be reliable.

MrDig
June 27, 2012, 06:54 PM
Henry makes them too

bikerdoc
June 27, 2012, 07:02 PM
I have a Marlin (original Marlin not a Remlin) 1894 css (Stainless Steel). It is a wonderful 357 carbine that does an amazing number of things well, from plinking, to hunting up to deer sized animals to HD. Very easy to carry in the field and a VERY fun gun to shoot and own. Very easy to disassemble and clean and very simple in its design. The ballistics on the 357 from a carbine length barrel are impressive. Also, mine digests 357s and 38s with ease. So, lots of options.

I'd highly recommend an original Marlin manufactured 1894. If you see one of the newer Remington manufactured ones, check the quality very carefully before you buy. Remington recognized that they had problems and are re-working their manufacturing to get them right. So, hopefully, they will fix what is wrong and you will have another option.

About the only thing you need with one are a good sling and peep sights.

You will absolutely love the Marlin lever action 357 carbine, its a must have.

I agree completely but keep it under 100yd

BYJO4
June 27, 2012, 08:39 PM
Marlin makes an excellent lever action. I have several friends who have the Marlin in 357 and swear by them. I have 2 Marlins but not in that caliber and they are accurate and fun to shoot.

Jlr2267
June 27, 2012, 08:53 PM
+1 on the Marlin. Funnest centerfire I've ever owned. Like it so much I want the 44 mag too.

The new ones are getting better (I recently got one), but the pre 2008 models are great if you can find one. They are going for big $ now so you have to be patient.

nipprdog
June 27, 2012, 08:54 PM
I did a search on this forum, but didn't find any info.



http://www.thehighroad.org/search.php?searchid=10320669

497 threads. ;)

303tom
June 27, 2012, 09:26 PM
http://www.henryrepeating.com/rifle-big-boy.cfm

greyling22
June 27, 2012, 09:49 PM
".....current production, quality...." rules out marlin.

Take a look at rossi, henry (if you can get past the yellow receiver) or maybe something by chiappa or one of the other italian repro outfits.

beag_nut
June 27, 2012, 10:07 PM
Thanks, everyone.
Any idea of the serial number range of the best (I assume it's before present manufacture) examples, if I go looking for a Marlin 1894?

Jlr2267
June 27, 2012, 10:38 PM
A 2007 marlin serial # will start with 93, a 2006 with 94, etc...subtract the first 2 numbers of the serial number from 100 to get year of manufacture. That works for Marlin guns made before Remington took over. Guns made at the New Haven plant are in high demand and have a "JM" stamp on the barrel just by the receiver. If it has a "REP" stamp it is a "Remlin" which may still be a fine gun, but does not bring the big $.

If I wanted a "real" Marlin, I would look for anything older than 2008 year of manufacture.

And by the way I bought a Remlin and it is a very good gun so far.

Crunchy Frog
June 27, 2012, 10:44 PM
Uberti makes several replica lever guns. Their reproduction of the Winchester 1873 (the "gun that won the West" donchaknow) is probably the most prized rifle with SASS cowboy shooters.

I really enjoy mine.

bubbacrabb
June 27, 2012, 11:53 PM
I've got a marlin 1894 in 44 and love it, I also have a 357 Henry that is just a beautiful rifle. The new gen is drilled and tapped, so you can easily put a Skinner sight on it. I think if you get the Henry you won't be dissapointed, made in the USA and beautiful wood and deep bluing

MrDig
June 28, 2012, 12:28 AM
Marlins are good guns and by all accounts are back near the Marlin Quality before Remington took them over.
I own a pre-Remington with the Safety 1894C and like it quite a bit. I also own a pre safety 1894 44 magnum. It is rather tired looking (I bought it used) but is still a wonderful gun.
There is a forum member who just bought the New 44 Magnum 1894 and likes it a great deal. So far has no troubles according to his range report.
here is a link to his thread
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=665083
Many members are reporting good things from the new Marlins so take from that what you will.

shiftyer1
June 28, 2012, 01:04 AM
Really? Try rewording your search. You'll find lots of good threads, I have and like an older Marlin, its not the only option but I havent had another to try. Apparently this platform has suddenly become wonderful or more finally noticec them. I wouldnt part with mine.....they aint all that easy to find either.

MrDig
June 28, 2012, 01:22 AM
I should also say that having field stripped both the Marlin and Winchester lever guns I like working on the Marlins much better they are seemingly easier if you need to get deep into them.

76shuvlinoff
June 28, 2012, 08:04 PM
I've got a 77 Marlin 1894c that is just too versatile not to have. Even sits next to my 870 as a HD option.

J_McLeod
June 28, 2012, 08:44 PM
I had a Marlin carbine. Really regret selling it.

TimboKhan
June 29, 2012, 12:10 AM
Even sits next to my 870 as a HD option.


I agree with you 100%. I would not hesitate to use mine as a HD gun, and the reality is that it has a lot going for it. The fact is that as a lever action quick reloads are pretty much a no go in a HD situation and that doesn't help it's case any. Also, while modern optics are possible, they certainly are a bit more ungainly placed atop a lever action rifle.

The upsides are that it is a mild-shooting, quick-handling carbine that doesn't require a particularly difficult manual of arms to operate and is in a excellent home defense caliber that actually performs a bit better from a carbine length barrel. I suppose looked at obliquely one could make the argument that a gun that emulates the firearms technology of 128 years ago is also less threatening that your average AR/AK or perhaps even a shotgun.

It wouldn't be my first choice, but it's pretty far away from being my last choice.

Water-Man
June 29, 2012, 12:56 AM
LSI Rossi/Puma M92

76shuvlinoff
June 29, 2012, 03:31 PM
TimboKhan.
I would have to admit that in most all HD situations that I can imagine I would be holed up with my .45 bottom feeder and 870 but that light quick handling .357 carbine would be no slouch.

The best part is my wife can run it along with her .357 SP101. (the revolver loaded with 158 gr .38 spcls)

gwnorth
June 29, 2012, 07:14 PM
I have a pair of current production Miroku Winchester 1892's, both in .357mag - 20" carbine and short rifle. Love 'em both and they are just a hoot to take out to the range.

The QC on the winchesters is very good too from what I saw when looking around and deciding what I wanted. Fit and finish of the internal parts is very good, blueing is nice and deep, well polished, very consistent, and the wood is very nicely done and well fitted to the frame. The action is slick, smooth and fast and I've had no issues at all with them. They will not feed .38spl rounds though, but are perfect with the 125-158gr .357 loads I have tried (including several hollow points, even some from a ~10yr old stock of 145gr silver tips I still have a few boxes of).

Crunchy Frog
June 29, 2012, 07:36 PM
TimboKhan raises a good point. A lever action rifle does not seem as "dangerous" as one of those evil black guns.

Was it Jeff Cooper who suggested that a lever action rifle would made a good police longarm? I think he was right, and a lever action rifle in trained hands is a very effective tool.

Of course after 911 the American public became more accepting of police officers toting semiauto carbines and even SMGs.

19-3Ben
June 29, 2012, 08:01 PM
The upsides are that it is a mild-shooting, quick-handling carbine that doesn't require a particularly difficult manual of arms to operate and is in a excellent home defense caliber that actually performs a bit better from a carbine length barrel.

Another few points in favor of the carbines are the weight, length, and capacity.
My Rossi M92 with 16" bbl is 34" long, 5lbs, and holds 9 rounds.
My Remington 870 is 38" long, 7.5 lbs, and holds 6 rounds.

Now of course the shotgun has a lot going for it as well. It's merits are well known and don't warrant further explanation. BUT, there are a lot of compelling arguments in favor of the Rossi.

The short OAL and light weight really help with maneuverability in tight quarters. Without getting into the argument about clearing a house vs. holing up in the bedroom, I am impressed with the idea of a .357mag carbine.

As soon as I finally get to reliability-test mine (and assuming it passes), it will become an HD rifle and may even grab a spot as "SHTF gun" as a companion to my Security Six.

I do also buy the argument about it being less menacing looking than an EBR should one ever have to use it for "social purposes."

Loosenock
June 29, 2012, 08:28 PM
The last Winchester 92 (Miroku) I saw was 2 years ago. The last Marlin 1894 in .357 I've seen was longer than that. My friend has a pre safety Marlin 1894 I offered him $1000 in cold hard cash for and the no I got wasn't a polite no. I live in the huge metroplex of Colorado, attend gun shows and always on the look out for one and I haven't found one yet. I had to settle for a Uberti 1866 Yellow boy carbine in .38 special. If you come across one, you better get it while you can. It might be the last one you'll see for awhile

'drif

gwnorth
June 29, 2012, 08:46 PM
I bought my short rifle 92 just this past February, ordered from www.rrarms.com. They still list 33 in stock in .357mag.

My carbine I had my LGS order from Sports South, but their web site says they only have .44mag carbines in stock now.

I've been thinking of adding an 1873, but those seem even harder to track down.

MCgunner
June 29, 2012, 08:59 PM
Browning once offered a Winchester 92 copy of high quality. They're hard to find. Winchester offered the 94 at one time in .357, I believe. Doubt they're much easier to find. The 92 action is among the strongest of these guns. Rossi even chambers the 92 in .454 Casull and .480 Ruger. I particularly like the .454 as one can remove the magazine cap and empty it, not necessary to unload it through the action. That's not the case with the Rossi 92 in .357 Magnum.

whetrock
June 30, 2012, 01:36 PM
I own both a Rossi R92 in 45LC and a pre remington Marlin 94 in 357. Both are fine rifles, with that being said I've found the older Marlins to be a bit cleaner than the newer Remlins. The Rossis are initially a little on the rough side, but with a bit of extended use wear in quite nicely. Also the old 92 Winnie action is just too cool and nostaligic to ignore. However like the newer and not so new Marlins the Rossi features a really ugly safety that IMO is pretty useless, but still price considered the Rossi is a good value as far as I'm concerned and I'm already hankerin' for one in 44 mag.

EVANVALK
September 28, 2012, 09:27 PM
BJ Orange... I meant that around 200/225, the bullet drop is too significant to, practically, use for hunting. With my .44mag, the maximum point blank range is about 150 yards. I can do 6" groups @ 150. Nothing special, but effective. Once I hit 200 yards, though, the bullet drop isn't a few inches, but more like a foot and with 8-10" with an exponentially steeper decrease in performance past 200. If I were to use the rifle for deer, for example, I'd not want to take a 200 yard shot.

I'm somewhat assuming that the same would apply with the .357 version, except with a little more distance. Hence, 175 for hunting with the .44 and 200/225 for hunting with the .357 (honestly not sure if the .357 is used for hunting or not...).

Above all, I was just describing the performance of my rifle with my average abilities. I don't necessarily know all the correct terms for this stuff, but I hope this explained myself.

Edited: I just looked up "effective range" and if you were referring to the .357's ability to kill, then yes I would agree that it's LOOONG past 200/225 yards. I just meant for practicality based on the abilities of the rifle to be reliable.

I also have 1 Marlin 1894 (no C ) 357 mag,Last year in NC I bagged a 8-pointer at 137 yds,mine will hold a streight path up to 200yds.at 300 yds a 10" drop.Ed.

35 Whelen
September 29, 2012, 01:52 PM
About a month ago I bought a Rossi 92 .357 in 20" for entry level CAS. At the time it was over $150 cheaper than the Marlin. They can be had new now for a little over $400. It's such a light, trim little rifle that I find myself carrying constantly when filling feeders, feeding the cattle, etc.
As of now, I've not fired much anything but light .38 loads in it and it'll do around 1.5" @ 50 yds. with the factory sights. I smoothed it up internally which turned it into a slick, fast-cycling little rig. Feeding is dicey with standard length .38's, but it'll run .357's and .38's with long seated bullets, RN's or SWC's, as fast as you can lever the action.
Good luck with your choice.

35W

wild willy
September 29, 2012, 02:14 PM
A .357 has much more than 10in drop at 300yds heck sighted in for 250yds it drops 16 in at 300.I have a Marlin 1894c and I have taken deer with it. By no strech is a 300yd hunting gun.With a 100yd zero a 158gr drops over 4 feet at 300yds

MCgunner
September 29, 2012, 03:11 PM
I ain't worried about drop. At the muzzle, my 165 gas checked cast SWC (Keith style from a Lee mold) is clocked just shy of 1900 fps and packing 1200+ ft lbs IIRC. At 100 yards, the energy is down to 650 ft lbs and it's dropping faster than the bullet. To shoot deer sized game beyond that point is to be irresponsible. You're running out of juice by 100 yards no matter the trajectory problems. Just what you need when accuracy is iffy (mine shots 4" at 100 yards off the bench, quite typical) and drop and range estimation becomes a factor is for energy to be minimal.

Nope, I'll take my .308 if I wanna shoot past 100 yards, or my 7 mag or my .257 Roberts or even my SKSs.

CraigC
September 29, 2012, 03:21 PM
I agree that while the .357 gains a lot of velocity from a rifle barrel, it really shouldn't be used on deer-sized game much beyond 100yds. I take the .44Mag to 150yds but it's carrying a lot more mass and doesn't need to expand to be effective.

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