Ruger M77 MKII 6.5 X 55


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GlockNation
July 1, 2012, 02:47 AM
Can anyone tell me about this rifle? I have heard some rumors, not necessarily specific to the 6.5 x 55, that the trigger is worse than both the original MK as well as the MK HAWKEYE; that Ruger was farming out barrel making for some of their MK II rifles early in the second generation cycle and those barrels have larger groups at 200 yards; that the HAWKEYE is much more accurate that the MK II, and that the wood stock is better on the HAWKEYE.

Questions:

1. How is MK II's accuracy?

2. How is the trigger?

3. What is the length of pull (LOP)?

4. What is the twist rate?

5. What problems are there with it?

6. Do you recommend this rifle or something else in 6.5 x 55?

Many thanks in advance for your observations and advice.

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WardenWolf
July 1, 2012, 04:37 AM
I've heard very little good about the M77 series pre-Hawkeye. Lots of complaints about sub-par accuracy for the price of the gun. Look at Savage for highly accurate options in various calibers.

meanmrmustard
July 1, 2012, 07:41 AM
Where's Kachok? If he can't tell you that that older M77s were superior to the Hawkeye, he can surely school us on his pet round, the 6.5 swede.My stepmother has a 2001 M77 compact in .260 rem, and it is accurate, even for a short barrel. Much more so than my dads 1995 M77 full size '06.

Kachok is the guy to listen to on that round. As for the platform, I don't know of a bad M77.

Coltdriver
July 1, 2012, 08:40 AM
One million rifles get made, one percent of them suck. Its the owners of those rifles that suck who post to complain. It appears as though they are all bad. But simply not true.

I have a MKII in .223 and I had one in .308. Both excellent and very accurate rifles.

They have a thin profile barrel. So if you sit and shoot at a bench they will heat right up. When they get hot accuracy will suffer. If your getting it for hunting this is not an issue. If you want a bench rest rifle I'd find one with a heavier barrel.

The 6.5 Swedish is an inherently excellent round. When you get into that 6mm to 6.5 mm range there is a sweet spot for accuracy and efficiency. I also have a 6.5 Swedish in a 1942 M38.

My Ruger .308 trigger was ok, my .223 trigger is outstanding. If you really want a lighter trigger there are aftermarket units. I always thought the hype about a 2 pound trigger was just hype. In the field I want 4 pounds or so.

You should verify that the 6.5 you want has a 1 in 8 twist. Anything less and it will not stabilize the 160 grain bullets. The 160 grain bullets have the highest sectional density of any bullet you can get and they are largely responsible for the reputation of the 6.5 Swede.

Finding a 6.5 with a 1 in 8 twist means you will have to do some looking. If the Ruger has that twist and you are planning on hunting with it I would not hesitate to get it.

interlock
July 1, 2012, 09:16 AM
I had one and it was excellent... until i leant it to my cousin who kept it with the moderator on stood on its stock and condensation formed in the moderator and acid trickled down the barrel.... well that was that.

i had a timney trigger. it was lovely.

the 6.5 x 55 is an excellent round.

Art Eatman
July 1, 2012, 09:22 AM
Back ten or twelve years ago I bought a 77 Mk II light sporter in .223. It had the "tort liability" trigger. It wasn't easy, but it was capable of five-shot, half-MOA groups. So, the easy and inexpensive deal was to put a Timney in it, which I did. The rifle didn't shoot "better"; just "easier". :)

68wj
July 1, 2012, 11:07 AM
My 1995, boat paddle stocked, 77 MKII took a Timney trigger and finding the right load to show its potential, but I wouldn't part with it now.

A newer production in 6.5 would be great, but I would probably start shopping for another trigger too (I have become a trigger snob :uhoh:)

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