Whats the difference between Jacketed and plated ammo?


PDA






wolverine_173
July 3, 2012, 11:02 PM
Is one better for your barrel?

If you enjoyed reading about "Whats the difference between Jacketed and plated ammo?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Ditchtiger
July 3, 2012, 11:05 PM
Plated bullets are to be used at a lower velocity than jacketed so plated may be easier on barrels.
Do you know the difference between the two?

wolverine_173
July 3, 2012, 11:09 PM
no, can someone post pics of the two i tried a google but i dont think im getting the right pics


Is jacketed mean FMJ (full metal jacket)

black_powder_Rob
July 3, 2012, 11:20 PM
Full Metal Jackets is a bullet with a lead core that has a jacket around it. It usually has an exposed lead base though. The plated bullets are completely coated with another metal like copper. and as stated earlier plated is usually for lower velocities.

Check out berry's mfg plated bullets they have a section in the FAQ that talks about it.
http://www.berrysmfg.com/

Cdstang
July 3, 2012, 11:21 PM
Not sure if its against the rules to post a link to a different forum.

Cutaways plated vs fmj (http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=494465)

If link is against the rules Mod please delete.

Ditchtiger
July 3, 2012, 11:21 PM
A jacket is just that, a sheet of material placed around a core.
Plating involves electrolysis to place a gilding material on the core and is usually thinner and meant to be used at lower velocities.

black_powder_Rob
July 3, 2012, 11:24 PM
Berry's Preferred Plated bullets begin as a swaged lead core. The plating process works through electrolysis. The swaged lead cores are tumbled in an electrically charged bath containing high-grade copper ingots. The copper clings to the lead and the longer the bullets remain in the bath, the thicker the plating. Our bullets are plated to the correct size and then taken out of the bath.

Jacketed bullets start with a copper cup, which is "drawn up" into the form of a jacket. Lead is then swaged into the jacket.

Cast bullets are made up of lead that has been poured into a bullet mould. These bullets come in various hardness levels depending upon the alloy of the lead. All of our cast bullets are lubed and all have the same hardness (about 20 bhu). We distinguish between Hardcast and Cowboy only in that our Cowboy bullets are often used in Cowboy Action Shooting events.



Pulled this from their website for ya. ;)

wolverine_173
July 3, 2012, 11:28 PM
so if i reload with berry's plated bullets, for 9mm what velocities are safe for my barrel?

wally
July 3, 2012, 11:50 PM
so if i reload with berry's plated bullets, for 9mm what velocities are safe for my barrel?

I load them like cast bullets, stay below 1050-1100 fps. They shoot very clean but mostly I use the 147gr in the 900-950 fps range.

BCRider
July 4, 2012, 12:15 AM
The simple fact is that with a semi auto you have a limited range of power you can shoot from the round without needing to use a different recoil spring.

If you load down the gun will begin to fail to lock back on the last round and will often begin to suffer from stovepipe jams more frequently since the round does not have enough power to fully cycle the slide.

If you load up you may not see any issues at first since there is more than enough energy to cycle the slide. Where you will find out that it wasn't a good idea is when cracks appear in the slide or frame or you start breaking barrel recoil lugs or slide stop pins. Or if your gun has a recoil buffer it'll mash them into ruin much faster than usual. This happens because your recoil spring does not have the power to fully damp out the recoil impulse before you get hard metal to metal contact at the end of the travel.

So it's typically best to stick to regular velocities than to try to push the envelope. At least unless you're willing to keep an assortment of low to high power recoil springs and swap then when you change loading recipes.

Fishslayer
July 4, 2012, 12:20 AM
Generally lead to mid-jacketed level loads are good for plated. That's usually where your best accuracy is at anyway.

hang fire
July 4, 2012, 02:24 AM
Heavy duty rain gear and a plastic garbage bag with three holes cut in it.

DeadLiver
July 5, 2012, 01:49 AM
When loading for my .45, I usually use plated bullets. Jacketed .45 projectiles are kinda expensive. Sticking with low-end powder charges, they work fine. Since the plating on the plated bullets is thinner they are softer, and in my experience can be very accurate. For plinking type ammo I love plated bullets.

303tom
July 5, 2012, 07:34 AM
The difference being thickness...............

340PD
July 5, 2012, 11:05 AM
I use plated in all my reloads. Barrel cleanup is much easier than lead bullets and the cost savings over FMJ makes them the perfect compromise for me.

oneounceload
July 5, 2012, 11:23 AM
the perfect compromise

And that's what they are - compromise - not as cheap as lead, can't be loaded as fast as jacketed. If it works for you in your gun, then it makes sense to use them

WardenWolf
July 5, 2012, 11:27 AM
Generally jacketed is considered higher quality. The only real point to plating is helping with feeding somewhat. It provides a little additional hardness to the round so it doesn't deform when feeding, as well as reducing friction. This is why I primarily shoot CCI Mini Mags in my .22LR guns. The copper plating makes them feed much more reliably.

Canuck-IL
July 5, 2012, 12:43 PM
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e346/Canuck-IL/Jacket_thicknesses.jpg
[courtesy Niemi24s]

/Bryan

The Lone Haranguer
July 5, 2012, 01:25 PM
Plating is a chemical bonding process, jacketing is an overlay of thin metal over a core. Full metal jacket bullets usually have an exposed lead base with the jacket rolled over the edges. The friction properties of jacketed vs. plated bullets against barrel rifling depend on the thickness of the plating. Some plating is very thin, others, like CCI/Speer's Total Metal Jacket, is virtually the same as an actual jacket.

skeeziks
July 5, 2012, 07:24 PM
Some plating is very thin, others, like CCI/Speer's Total Metal Jacket, is virtually the same as an actual jacket.

Isn't Speer's TMJ an actual jacket?

The Lone Haranguer
July 5, 2012, 08:53 PM
As I understand it, it is actually a proprietary process, a thick plating over the entire bullet.

If you enjoyed reading about "Whats the difference between Jacketed and plated ammo?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!