Played an arcade game for the first time in forever...


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Skribs
July 4, 2012, 04:53 PM
I went to see the new Spiderman (which was awesome, by the way, IMHO) and got to the theatre early. Had some time to kill, so I put a buck into the Time Crisis game - the one where you step on the pedal to come out from cover and then shoot with the arcade gun.

The last time I played a game like this was back in high school, before I knew much about guns or proper gun handling. It was rather interesting to note that I transferred a lot of the little things over from what I've learned since, including - keeping my finger outside of the trigger guard while not firing (ducked behind cover, or during the cutscenes where I move), keeping the gun down and away from the screen (away from teammates and civilians) while not firing, and so on. It wasn't even conscious at first - after going through the first few firing positions, I realized I was doing this, and it made me smile.

Oh, range review - the gun sucked. The sights were off (I was consistently hitting an inch to the left, had to just point shoot) and the trigger was absolutely terrible.

In all seriousness, though, this thread was more about the second paragraph, and how training for safety makes the safe practice subconscious. It's still there, and you know it's there, but if the practices are ingrained, you don't have to think about how to safely handle a firearm - it should always be on your mind, but if you can get it into muscle memory, you can save brain cells for situational awareness and threat assessment.

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G27RR
July 5, 2012, 01:41 PM
In all seriousness, though, this thread was more about the second paragraph, and how training for safety makes the safe practice subconscious. It's still there, and you know it's there, but if the practices are ingrained, you don't have to think about how to safely handle a firearm - it should always be on your mind, but if you can get it into muscle memory, you can save brain cells for situational awareness and threat assessment.

Yep.

For those that worry about a manual thumb safety and whether they would remember to take it off in a self defense situation, if you train with it every time you handle the gun, it will be ingrained, too. For example,at the range you can practice engaging the safety every time you're off target, and disengaging it when you go on target. Some people might tend not to use the safety at the range but it's good practice if you do.

I found I had practiced that enough that when I took some more advanced training courses, the safety was always in the proper position for the situation without having to consciously think about it. Always engaged when off target and disengaged when actually on the target.

Skribs
July 5, 2012, 02:17 PM
For those that worry about a manual thumb safety and whether they would remember to take it off in a self defense situation, if you train with it every time you handle the gun, it will be ingrained, too. For example,at the range you can practice engaging the safety every time you're off target, and disengaging it when you go on target. Some people might tend not to use the safety at the range but it's good practice if you do.

Heh, I'm in the boat you speak of here. Not that I think it would be an issue, I just figured it would be one less thing to commit to muscle memory. It's why I choose handguns that don't require one.

T Bran
July 5, 2012, 02:38 PM
It really is kinda funny I even catch myself strait fingering my air tools out of habit.
Guess once it gels in your brain it carries over into lots of different things in your life.

230RN
July 5, 2012, 04:49 PM
^
Heh. I'm the same way with electric drills and soldering guns and the like. Every once in a while I realize I'm doing it and grin to myself. I even do that with staple guns even though it's pointless because your other three fingers are still on the "trigger!"

Years ago my older brother and I used to go to Coney Island and one of our fun things was the shooting galleries with real (gallery) ammo. I remember the .22s were tube magazines, filled by the carney from other tubes he had pre-loaded for the customers. The guns were chained down so you could not swing them around toward the public.

The sights were always off. He taught me to take a couple of shots around the targets until we hit one, then remember how to hold off to make hits. We'd blow the first magazines each getting the Kentucky Windage and Kentucy Elevationage, and then proceed to clean up on Kewpie dolls and the other crappy prizes they offered. Usually after two or three mags full each, the carney would stop us from shooting. I was great at knocking down the chain of ducks they had moving across the backstop. Ping ping ping, one right after the other.

Terry, "Living Historian," 230RN

CWL
July 5, 2012, 07:10 PM
If anyone trains & practices regularly on where to keep trigger finger, muscle memory makes this your standard manual of arms location until ready to fire.

skeeziks
July 5, 2012, 07:18 PM
A buck to play a video game ???
The last time I played one it cost .25 cents. ~ :)

Trunk Monkey
July 5, 2012, 07:46 PM
A buck?

I remember when those games were a quarter

HDCamel
July 5, 2012, 08:36 PM
Skeeziks, Trunk Monkey,

There are still games that cost a quarter to play, but a Time Crisis cab is a $5k-$7k investment for whoever bought it depending on which version and the condition of the machine.

On-topic:
I actually straight finger my PS3 controller when I'm playing a shooter.

TimboKhan
July 5, 2012, 11:02 PM
Uh...

Interesting, but I can easily predict that this is going to go down quickly with spiderman reviews and discussions about deagles and pwning.

Interesting point and good responses, but I think every thing that can be said on this one has been said.

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