Just got a new Marlin 60, my first gun...Now have Questions!


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IdealFugacity
July 26, 2012, 10:52 PM
And now I'm worried! I've been reading about storage, dehumidifiers, and on and on for 2 hours now.

I already know that tomorrow, the night before my first use, I will disassemble and clean up any crud in the action then LIGHTLY oil it, and also I will run solvent and dry patches thru the barrel to make sure there's no manufacturing remnants.

After shooting it Saturday and Sunday I'll clean it again, this time with a thin coat of oil on the inside of the barrel instead of solvent when I am done (and on outside surfaces too).

But now... I only have the soft carrying case I bought at the same time as the rifle.

It seems like most storage solutions will cost more than the Marlin 60 did! My apartment also is out of room ... and now I'm starting to worry I bit off more than I can chew, which seems silly when I'm only talking about a way to store a rifle.

I would love any suggestions.

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cat_IT_guy
July 26, 2012, 11:08 PM
Dont worry too much about it. A 60 is a great gun, in part because they are durable and reliable. As long as you clean it well periodically, theres really no problem keeping it in the case under your bed, in a closet, etc. Dont think that you need to run out and spend $200+ on a gun safe. Now if it would make you feel better to have it locked, by all means, go for it.

My 60 lives in a cheap safe (maybe $150? - its been awhile) with my other guns, and Ive never had a problem. Now if I spent $3000+ on a fancy safari rifle with gorgeous wood, then Id think about a humidifier and a big expensive safe.

Now - go out and enjoy your new toy ;)

IdealFugacity
July 26, 2012, 11:27 PM
Thanks for the info. I'm definitely not looking for a thousand dollar unbreakable safe...I feel plenty fine about the chamber lock on it for my current life situation / living arrangement. My main concern is maintaining the reliability of the gun.

Your post alleviated my concern somewhat. I do want to gain the proper habits right off the bat regarding proper care and maintenance. What does a regular rust/cleaning maintenance program look like?

For example, I'm going to use it for the first time this weekend, in the free outdoor range in the community my parents have a vacation home in PA. That's the last weekend I actually have available until mid-September (unless I pay to go to a range near where I live, and those are SPARSE and far away when you live in Jersey).

In the intervening 8 weeks, and other similar periods, how often am I taking the gun out and cleaning it? Just oil down the bore and the outside of the barrel, or am I taking the action from the stock, disassembling and oiling etc? I don't want to be one of those users who "did more damage by overcleaning" but I don't want to take the easy/lazy way out using that as an excuse, either.

I get way too amped up when I enter new hobbies, but find that I can learn a ton about proper care and maintenance early on and then the rest of my career I get to enjoy it and focus on new nuances! So I apologize if these are too many detailed questions from a newbie but am very grateful for any more comments.

Furncliff
July 26, 2012, 11:36 PM
I live in a very dry climate, and my guns are in soft cases hanging from the wall. If you are worried about rust or damage caused by humid air, you could put one of these in the case with your rifle.

http://www.amazon.com/Pelican-1500D-Desiccant-Silica-1500-500-000/dp/B0018O035O

If you get the rifle prepped well it will require minimum care unless you live in costal Jersey.
It's hard to talk specifics, because each situation is different. I have two Marlin 60's, they require very minimal care.

One_Jackal
July 27, 2012, 01:07 AM
Don't oil the inside of a rifle barrel unless you plan to store it for a long time. When oil burns it leaves carbon deposits. In turn, these carbon deposits ruin the accuracy of your rifle. If you use a bore cleaner that contains oil run dry patches through the barrel until they are dry. Just brush the barrel of your rifle after each use. I hope you enjoy your Marlin 60. I have a model 60 that is over 35 years old. My model 60 still shoots great.

firesky101
July 27, 2012, 01:13 AM
I responded to your other thread. Sorry did not mean to scare you. Just wanted to caution against storing in your soft case. If you are not worried about locking it up it will be fine in a closet as long as you do not ignore it forever.

fireman 9731
July 27, 2012, 01:44 AM
Don't worry about cleaning it so much, it wont rust overnight, or in a few months if you are in a reasonable climate. After your first initial cleaning any rust preventative product will work and under normal conditions wont need to be reapplied for about a year probably.

I really like my model 60, and I like well lubed parts, but I run my model 60 dry. Seems like even a light coat of oil picks up and holds onto all the grit and grime in 22 ammo and gums it up pretty quick.

JDMorris
July 27, 2012, 01:49 AM
The 60 is not an easy gun to take down if you are new to shooting.. Lot's of little parts and it has to come apart and be put back together in steps.

bubbacrabb
July 27, 2012, 02:14 AM
The model 60, my favorite 22 and I own a lot of them. First off, take it easy on the cleaning. IMO, the fastest way to ruin a 22 is to clean it. I dont clean my 22s for a long time. They'll run a long while without cleaning them. At the most I'll run a 22 bore snake down it every 1500 rounds or so. I'll strip it and clean maybe once a year. You can learn a lot on that by watching a youtube video or two. Lots of good info out there on them. As long as you wipe them down with some oil its not gonna rust. You dont need much to keep them in good working order. I would watch putting them inside of a foam case, I have had guns rust a bit in them. You can pick up an inexpensive gun cabinet to put it in if you really need it to be safe from children and such. Oil is your friend. Get a good quality oil and you'll be fine.

One_Jackal
July 27, 2012, 02:19 AM
The 60 is not an easy gun to take down if you are new to shooting.. Lot's of little parts and it has to come apart and be put back together in steps.
I agree completely with JDMorris. When my Model 60 gets dirty I just take the stock off and rinse it with hot water. If it is really nasty I use a little Dawn and a toothbrush. After washing I blow dry it. Once you get the metal warm you can let it sit for an hour or so. I lube it lightly with remoil or 3 in 1 oil. Then put the stock back on it. It's good for 120 days or 500 rounds.

Elkins45
July 27, 2012, 06:35 AM
I agree that it's a good idea to clean the bore before the first shots, but most 22 rifles rarely, if ever need their bore cleaned again. THe lubricant on the 22 bullets forms a natural protectant of the bore.

I rigorously clean my centerfire rifle barrels, but I never clean the bore of even my most expensive and accurate 22's.

RickMD
July 27, 2012, 07:40 AM
I was a member of my university rifle team many years ago. We shot Remington 40X's and the bores were never cleaned. You do more damage to a .22 rimfire bore by cleaning than by any other means. .22 caliber cartridges are self lubricating as Elkins mentioned and it's rare to ever find a .22 with a rusted bore.

Wipe it down with an oily rag after use, spray out the action and trigger mechanism with carburetor cleaner every year or so, and lightly lubricate the moving parts. The gun will outlast you and your grandchildren.

HoosierQ
July 27, 2012, 07:45 AM
Good choice. Those guns are, well, bullet proof. Ever watch "Swamp People"? Looks to me like 2 or 3 of those guys have 60's and they're all rusty and they just spray a little CLP or whatever in the action now and again.

Just keep it dry, keep a little oil on it, an it will run for a hundred years. You'll be handing that gun down to your grandchildren. Safes are good but all that fancy de-humidifier type stuff is for collectors...who have 10's of thousands of dollars of investments to protect. The normal American shooter, like you, just needs a silicone rag, some oil, and a few patches. If there are little kids around, you're gonna want to keep it unloaded and get a trigger lock or some kind of action lock. The Ruger 10/22 has kind of neat action lock thing.

IdealFugacity
July 27, 2012, 09:47 AM
Wow thanks for all of the fantastic replies! The rifle came with a lock that has a tab that prevents the chamber from closing.

Totally new to this, so when you say you don't suggest "taking the action apart", that means to go more steps than the ones outline in the manual? The manual describes removing the action section from the stock and trigger, and going as far as removing the bolt and recoil spring. Is that "taking the action apart", or only if I go further steps than that?

Thanks for all the great reassuring posts. Maybe I will get a chance to use it before sunset tonight if I just need to run some dry patches through the bore first, and nothing else : ) driving past a PA state game land range tonight on my way to the lake house, got my permit for those ranges the day after I bought the rifle.

aka108
July 27, 2012, 10:29 AM
I do;t own a Marlin 60 but a few years ago I purchased at Taurus 22 cal rifle. In the owners manual it stated that it was never necessary to clean the bore, just keep the action relatively clean. Same would apply to the 60 and other 22's as well.

HoosierQ
July 27, 2012, 01:41 PM
Yeah...that's taking the action apart. I don't think the model 60 is any where near the hardest .22 semi-auto to take apart but I think it not the easiest either. A lot of guys spray some CLP (google that, there are many brands and it stands for Clean, Lube, Protect) with the little spray nozzle straw thingy and get it all wet up in there with the product (make sure you shake CLP well before spraying) and then they blow it out with either an air hose or that canned air stuff. Doing that a couple times should do a halfway decent job of cleaning all but the filthiest gun. That's going to be messy so take the action out of the stock in one piece and do it somewhere outdoors or in a shop.

You got a good'n going there. Enjoy it.

rcmodel
July 27, 2012, 01:49 PM
Most peoples rust issues are caused by neglect.

If you get a Silicone cloth or RIG-RAG, and wipe your sweaty cheese curl encrusted fingerprints off of the metal every time you get done handling it?

It won't rust setting in a corner in your apartment from now on.

http://www.amazon.com/Birchwood-Casey-Silicone-Reel-Cloth/dp/B0002IKAU0

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=31843/Product/RIG-RAG-UNIVERSAL-GREASE-APPLICATOR

rc

MikeST
July 27, 2012, 06:26 PM
Spray oil + Bore Snake at most, and even that's a lot. I have a marlin 795 that I've never cleaned, at it's never failed.

I think maintenance on a .22 is a good idea if you want to get in the habit of maintaining firearms that actually require it, but your Model 60 definitely won't. In fact, take-down might be more detrimental to it than never cleaning it (i.e. you could pretty easily bend the recoil/bolt spring or damage the thin extractor hook).

fanchisimo
July 27, 2012, 07:27 PM
I wouldn't say that I used it like a beater gun but I have put my 60 through it's paces with less than regular cleaning and it's still accurate and reliable. Just oil it on occasion, moreso if you're in a humid enviroment, and you'll be shooting if for years to come.

Patocazador
July 27, 2012, 08:57 PM
Man, it seems to me that you're just too amped up about this. The gun is to enjoy not fret about. Go shoot and have fun, wipe it off with an old rag that has been sprayed with gun cleaner/lubricant, store it upright in the corner. I live in Florida with 75% humidity and don't do any more than that.

I use a NEW cloth diaper with G-96 and just wipe down the outside and run a swap up the barrel when I think of it.

splattergun
July 27, 2012, 09:16 PM
My model 60's action got gummed up to the point it was stove-piping empties and failing to feed last year after I-don't-know-how-many years of not cleaning it. I disassembled and cleaned it. PITA! I should have just hosed it with brake cleaner. My groups opened up double so I haven't shot it much lately. I think I need to burn through a couple bricks of 22LR to get it back into shooting form. (DARN IT! another need to go shooting. :evil:

I agree with the bulk of the above posts, in that your Marlin 60 is happiest wearing its work dirt. Keep the outside clean and brush the barrel. Light oil outside never harmed a weapon AFAIK. Store it with a barrel lock if you have kids. Keeping it in a case all the time might lead to rust. As I have no kids in the house, mine lives in my bedroom closet, loaded, xcept when the g'kids come over, then it's locked up in my cheapo gun locker.

I really like my 60. I trust you will too.

One_Jackal
July 28, 2012, 01:18 AM
The Model 60 by design is going to be dirty. If you get remington ammo after 500 rounds it will have a thick layer of crud on the parts under the bolt. The method of care really doesn't matter that much. Everyone has a different opinion of how to care for a model 60. Most of them last a long time for everyone. Just give it some care!

pmata814
July 28, 2012, 02:54 AM
Hi there. I, just like you, am brand new to shooting. My bros and I picked up this hobby just last month as something to do during the summer and I fell in love with it. I, again just like you, also purchased a model 60 just yesterday. I actually started with the Ruger 10/22 but was a very close call between that and the marlin. I came about a $50 coupon for a local gun store and I just couldn't resist and I went and got me the Marlin.

Anyways... all this is to say that I have also read that you need to field strip and clean a new rifle before you shoot it for the first time. I went on youtube and found this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VfC_2qxvV0
(I used this one but there are several available just do a search and pick the one you like)

I dissasembled and cleaned the rifle and found it to be very easy. I don't know anything about rifles but the components looked filthy to me. I don't know if this is normal but I doubt it. Cleaned it and lightly oiled it and took it out to shoot for the first time today and it worked flawlessly. The only other experience I had with this sort of thing was when I did the same for my ruger a couple of weeks ago following a video on the ruger website. I feel that if I can do it...anyone can :)

I hope this helps some...good luck. :)

P.S.
I used hoppes #9 solvent and Hoppes gun oil to do the cleaning in case you're curious.

x_wrench
July 28, 2012, 12:41 PM
first of all, you are going way overboard on the worrying. yes, clean the gun before using it. yes, clean and oil it afterwards. until about 5 years ago, all of my guns got stood in the back corners of closets. if you have small children, you will need to put some kind of a locking device on it, and place the rifle where their little arms and fingers can not reach it. you may also find that for a short while, that the gun needs to be "run wet" until the parts mate in. i bought my son one for Christmas this year, and the only way it will not jam is to spray oil the action.

One_Jackal
July 28, 2012, 01:27 PM
When many weapons are assembled grease is applied to the parts. The grease used in a factory is not a lubricant, it's a preservative. The manufacturer has no idea how long the gun will sit before it is put into service. All new weapons should be field stripped and cleaned before putting the new gun into service.

Hunter125
July 28, 2012, 10:42 PM
I agree completely with JDMorris. When my Model 60 gets dirty I just take the stock off and rinse it with hot water. If it is really nasty I use a little Dawn and a toothbrush. After washing I blow dry it. Once you get the metal warm you can let it sit for an hour or so. I lube it lightly with remoil or 3 in 1 oil. Then put the stock back on it. It's good for 120 days or 500 rounds.

^^^Please don't do this. Learn how to take your gun apart. It really is not difficult, but clean it properly and it will outlast you. Use products made for guns, they are the best things for your gun. Only do something like this^^^ if you jhave no other options. Takes me 15 minutes tops to thoroughly strip and clean my 60. Learn to do it, get familiar with your rifle. Then you will know if something is not right and a part needs replaced.
My buffer was broken once (after many years and many thousands of rounds) and I was able to order a $3 part and replace it myself because I knew my gun.

Don't store it in a soft case, that is the best way to rust your gun. Foam is even worse. I paid $80 for a simple sheet metal locking gun cabinet, nothing fancy.

I clean mine maaybe every six months, but I go through probably 2000 rounds or so a year.

Take care of it and your great grandchildren will be shooting it.

IdealFugacity
July 28, 2012, 11:15 PM
Last night I stripped it down, swabbed the barrel with my Otis cleaning kit, running Hoppes 9, dry, Hoppes oil, dry thru the bore, the action didn't have any gunk or manufacturing debris on it so I might have put one drop of oil on the slide. Oiled the outside of the barrel and stopped storing it in a rough case.

By noon today my girlfriend, my dad, and I had each fired off around 25 rounds of CCI standard velocity 36 grain. 15 and 25 yards, at the "back yard range" in the neighborhood. Had a "blast"...had a few 2" groupings with the iron sights, first time out so I was happy. 2 hours on the lake in the boats, then took my mom and girlfriend to the PA state gameland range, which was 25 mins away and, as luck would have it, we each got off 3 shots at the 25 yard target before rain storms hit. Due to the heavy sudden downpour, I stripped and ran a patch thru the bore again when we got home, and oiled the outside to remove finger prints. Mom had a 4" grouping centered around the bullseye, not bad for a first-time shooter in her 60s.

Love it!!!! Going to keep practicing the iron sights and invest in a scope next. Got permission from the GF to hang a squirrel on the wall, so marksmanship practice as much as I can before the fall : )

IdealFugacity
July 30, 2012, 02:43 PM
I hope this picture works, as I enabled Privacy settings on Flickr but think the links may work anyway. Let me know if they didn't work and I will change it!

I came up with a storage solution, to use what I believe is the very last nook and/or cranny available in our apartment, adds a layer of child deterrent (of course in addition to the action lock), is very subtle, and lets me store the rifle after oiling the exposed metal on the outside, handling the stock from the table to the rack, and put it somewhere where it won't gather fingerprints.

I wouldn't post this on a woodworking forum but I think it is pretty utilitarian!

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7259/7678401734_c7a0cd842d_c.jpg


http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7133/7678404636_a80d1c1de2_c.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7252/7678406866_1bfc7e1258_c.jpg

Go in the closet and look up... (this is immediately above the door frame, about 20" above the open space between the shelf and the wall)

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8281/7678405902_31e1eedd49_c.jpg


I am registering for the PA independent study Hunter Education program. I would like to do the classes, but they are not available to me due to the distance my permanent residence is in NJ from where the classes are held. New Jersey is a joke with their regulations so I am not even bothering with thinking about hunting locally. I'll do the PA safety courses and do my hunting there. I found out that there are THREE state gamelands within 30 minutes (on FOOT) from our cabin up there, including one which actually butts up against the shooting range in the neighborhood, and several more within easy driving distance.

IdealFugacity
July 31, 2012, 09:25 AM
Bought a Nikon Prostaff 4X32 yesterday. Found out today I can't use the semi-auto marlin 60 in pennsylvania for hunting : ( guess I'll try to get good with the rifle then pick up a bolt-action that can accept the same scope if I like it.

One_Jackal
July 31, 2012, 05:35 PM
^^^Please don't do this. Learn how to take your gun apart. It really is not difficult, but clean it properly and it will outlast you. Use products made for guns, they are the best things for your gun. Only do something like this^^^ if you jhave no other options. Takes me 15 minutes tops to thoroughly strip and clean my 60. Learn to do it, get familiar with your rifle. Then you will know if something is not right and a part needs replaced.
My buffer was broken once (after many years and many thousands of rounds) and I was able to order a $3 part and replace it myself because I knew my gun.

Don't store it in a soft case, that is the best way to rust your gun. Foam is even worse. I paid $80 for a simple sheet metal locking gun cabinet, nothing fancy.

I clean mine maaybe every six months, but I go through probably 2000 rounds or so a year.

Take care of it and your great grandchildren will be shooting it.
ERRRRMMM, I have been doing this for 35 years. My guns last as long as anyones. the military has been cleaning guns like that long before your great grandfather was born and they still shoot well.

If I wanted some snob to talk down to me I would go to the high dollar gun shop.

Hunter125
July 31, 2012, 11:52 PM
I wanted some snob to talk down to me I would go to the high dollar gun shop.

No need to be nasty. Not being a snob, just trying to steer a new gun owner in the direction of proper gun care. He ought to learn how to care for his guns well before he starts taking short cuts.

I guess if you call rinsing and blow drying proper gun care over using solvents and gun oil we'll just have to agree to disagree.

High road gents, high road.

R3PTIL3
August 1, 2012, 01:25 AM
I have a Model 60. Good gun, but sometimes mine is a little finicky with what ammo I put through it.

One_Jackal
August 1, 2012, 01:35 AM
@Hunter125 If rinsing a rifle passes a military inspection it's pretty darned good. Telling someone with no experience to disassemble a model 60 is not very responsible. It's one of the more difficult guns to reassemble. But hey, getting a newbie to trash his new rifle makes you look cool. That is your high road?

snake284
August 1, 2012, 01:37 AM
Dont worry too much about it. A 60 is a great gun, in part because they are durable and reliable. As long as you clean it well periodically, theres really no problem keeping it in the case under your bed, in a closet, etc. Dont think that you need to run out and spend $200+ on a gun safe. Now if it would make you feel better to have it locked, by all means, go for it.

My 60 lives in a cheap safe (maybe $150? - its been awhile) with my other guns, and Ive never had a problem. Now if I spent $3000+ on a fancy safari rifle with gorgeous wood, then Id think about a humidifier and a big expensive safe.

Now - go out and enjoy your new toy ;)

I agree with benatilstate. Also, I don't know where you are geographically, but if you use AC it is more the better. AC keeps humidity down and I've never had problems with corrosion in my home for my firearms unless I failed to clean them when I had hunted with them. Like what was said, just with regular cleaning you will never have a problem. And by all means, when you've had your firearms out in the elements swab out the bore and wipe off the outside with Break Free or Rem Oil and you'll never have a problem. Just spray a little Break Free or Rem Oil on a patch and run it through the bore. Just don't oil it up with thick oil. And don't shoot it with a thick coating of oil in the barrel. In fact, I would swab out the bore before shooting with a dry patch. That will generally leave a thin fine coating of oil in the barrel but not so much as to damage the barrel when it's shot. Remember, Liquids don't compress.

snake284
August 1, 2012, 01:48 AM
^^^Please don't do this. Learn how to take your gun apart. It really is not difficult, but clean it properly and it will outlast you. Use products made for guns, they are the best things for your gun. Only do something like this^^^ if you jhave no other options. Takes me 15 minutes tops to thoroughly strip and clean my 60. Learn to do it, get familiar with your rifle. Then you will know if something is not right and a part needs replaced.
My buffer was broken once (after many years and many thousands of rounds) and I was able to order a $3 part and replace it myself because I knew my gun.

Don't store it in a soft case, that is the best way to rust your gun. Foam is even worse. I paid $80 for a simple sheet metal locking gun cabinet, nothing fancy.

I clean mine maaybe every six months, but I go through probably 2000 rounds or so a year.

Take care of it and your great grandchildren will be shooting it.

Well, all I do now in my semi old age is maybe take it out of the stock (maybe not) and spray the metal parts down with Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber, let it sit for 5-10 minutes and wipe it down. Then I spray a thin covering of Breakfree or Rem Oil on it and wipe this down. On my 22 Rim Fires I will swab out the barrel from the Chamber End if possible. If not I use a Muzzle Bore Guide and swab it from the muzzle end with a bronze brush and some Deaton's Deep Clean. Then I run dry patches down the barrel until they come out clean. But with the 22 rim fires I may or may not do this and usually clean it every two or three outings. With my center fire rifles I clean every trip to the range or field.

Another thing, the DDC has Ammonia, but it also contains lubricants that prevent it from drying out the metal and causing rust which can pit the bore. And it is also a great rust preventative. I wipe the outside metal down with it on a cloth before I store my guns.

IdealFugacity
August 1, 2012, 09:15 AM
No need to argue folks! Don't want my thread to turn into a battle over the right way to clean a .22. I have had no issues separating the bolt, action, and barrel from one another for the basic cleaning that I will give this rifle on the manual-spec basis, and until other issues occur that will be enough. I have done it 4 times and got better at it each time. As the spring breaks in it should get easier.

Thanks to all the advice about not bending the thin-but-long recoil spring, I've been careful to re-insert the bolt as follows:

1) Insert the thin metal rod thru the center of spring
2) Insert the small tip on the road into the hole for it at the back end of the barrel/breech...a few times I would reinsert the bolt and had to take it out again because I wasn't careful about keeping the rod in this hole
3) Slide the other end of the spring into the bolt
4) CAREFULLY pull the bolt back (this is hard free-hand, but until i build a vice my only way) - until the metal rod is into the hole of the bolt. This will prevent the spring from bending because you're using the rod as a guide now.
5) THEN lower the bolt into the breech. Put it all the way in and then let it slide forward while trying not to get fingers stuck.

My scope shipped yesterday. I will be improvising some sand bags to try and zero it next Friday. Yesterday I tested and was able to get a rock steady platform even using things like a bag of flour for the forend and a bag of lentils for the rear stock, so I think I will be able to DIY enough to zero it at 50 yards.

Sav .250
August 1, 2012, 09:27 AM
Clean it after you fire it. Wipe it down with a little RIG. Put it back in it`s case. Put it in your closet and rest easy. J s/n. :)

Hunter125
August 1, 2012, 09:42 AM
One Jackal, I'm just suggesting that a new gun owner needs to learn how his gun functions and learn the proper way to care for it, sounds like he's well on his way.

Kudos, IdealFugacity, and that rack it pretty clever. Good work.

Rinsing may pass military inspection and it may be your preferred method, but I hardly doubt anyone would say it's the best way to care for your gun and make it last. If somebody can't strip a gun to clean it and get it back together, maybe they ought to reconsider owning that particular gun.

My CCW instructor believed everyone who owned a gun should be able to detail strip, as in take absolutely everything apart. He said if you can't get it back together, take it to a gunsmith and have them show you how. I'm sure most would be happy to teach a little.

SlowFuse
August 1, 2012, 10:24 AM
You've gotten mostly good info so far... Great choice on the rifle. I have an old Glenfield Mod 75 (basically same as a Marlin mod 60) that still gives my newer rifles a run for their money in the accuracy dept. All you need is common sense, clean it every now and then and you shouldn't have a problem. As far as disassembling, mine only get it about once a year. Other than that, its a few patches down the bore and a wipe down.

Wildcat_Charlie
August 1, 2012, 01:11 PM
A lot of guys spray some CLP (google that, there are many brands and it stands for Clean, Lube, Protect) with the little spray nozzle straw thingy and get it all wet up in there with the product (make sure you shake CLP well before spraying) and then they blow it out with either an air hose or that canned air stuff. Doing that a couple times should do a halfway decent job of cleaning all but the filthiest gun. That's going to be messy so take the action out of the stock in one piece and do it somewhere outdoors or in a shop.

That's exactly how I clean my 60. It works like a new gun afterwards. The cleaner you use makes a lot of difference. CLP works great IMO. It won't leave enough residue to create a new problem when the burnt powder starts to accumulate in the oil. But that's only true if you do a good job of blowing out the excess. All that will be left will be the oil that got down inside the places where the moving parts meet their mounts. And that's what you want. Find yourself a needle type air hose nozzle. It will clean things out much quicker. But watch not to spray your hands with high pressure air from a nozzle like that. I wear a glove for protection. If you use too much pressure it can rip your hand open. Not likely especially if you limit how much pressure you use. I have a small compressor that only gets to 110 lbs. but I still wear a glove just in case.

If you just put oil on the action it will cause more problems than it fixes unless you spray it down every time you shoot it and I'm talking spraying half a can of cleaner in it.

Some people use brake fluid to completely clean all the crud from the action. It certainly cleans things up but it doesn't leave any lube for the moving parts. If you want to clean things that well it will be necessary to take the action apart and lube all the moving parts where they connect to their mounts. The CLP and air hose method are much easier.

Also there are some soft cases you can store your rifle in permanently. They will be treated with silicone inside. Foam rubber holds moisture and will cause a gun to rust in a big hurry if you keep a gun inside a closed case with regular foam rubber. If the foam is treated with silicone or has some other barrier to moisture on it then it's ok to store a gun in there. But I've seen new guns rust bad in a week inside a foam case. You could actually see some rust occur overnight. Those bags with just foam are for carrying your gun from place to place and protecting it while you're moving it. The only time I use one is when I'm taking a gun to a range etc..

IdealFugacity
August 1, 2012, 01:23 PM
Thanks - I'll definitely pick up a spray cleaning / air system then.

I will be keeping the gun in that closet-mounted rack for long term storage. If it can rust overnight in the soft case it makes travel tough (to the vacation home where there are very few places I can safely keep the gun if kids are around) but I'll figure something out. I just left it out on the table when I was there with aduls only this weekend. No climate control in the mountains and it was so horribly humid I definitely wouldn't want to zip it up in a case.

Hunter125
August 1, 2012, 01:40 PM
The type of rust that accumulates that quickly is a cosmetic surface rust. It can be prevented in most cases just by having a thin coat of oil on the exterior metal surfaces of the gun. Any rust that does accumulate after that can be wiped off with a rag and some oil. It won't do any damage. I'd check it over and wipe it down before you put it away for any extended period of time.

HoosierQ
August 2, 2012, 05:11 PM
This has been a very positive, affirming thread. It is exciting for us old dogs to be able to participate in helping somebody new to the sport (I think we're all assuming the OP to be young as well).

First thing I do when I get a new gun is learn how to take it apart as far as is advisable. I just purchased a 10/22 and that's probably one of the easier .22s to take apart. Not as easy as an AR-15 or a Glock or something...but pretty easy.

CLP is a product that everybody recommends...I do too. But there are others. I have been using a "home brew" of 50/50 Mobil 1 Synthetic Motor Oil to Marvel's Mystery Oil. Wow is that some slippery stuff!!! I have been using that on my 10/22 since I can easily get it apart and clean it and then get a thinish coat of that stuff on the bolt. Glides real easy which is good in a .22 auto.

Now opinions on this subject very, and somebody is going to disagree with me...and more power to them...but here goes. .22lr ammo is dirty. It's pretty much all dirtier than centerfire ammo. Also the way it's primed, it does not fire as reliably as centerfire ammo. For those reasons I am sticking to CCI standard and CCI MiniMag 22lr ammo. It is renowned for being cleaner than most and much more reliable that most. It is also more expensive but it certainly is not centerfire expensive. I do not find the margin prohibitive to have less crumbs and soot all up in the action and to have the thing go bang every time. I have been through probably 500 rounds with my new gun with not one single malfunction of any sort...nary a one. I cleaned my very thoroughly before firing it as the factory oil is more for preserving than lubing.

HoosierQ
August 2, 2012, 05:15 PM
So you can't hunt with a semi-auto .22 in Penn? Did I read that right? Too many rounds in the tube or just semi-auto in general?

I know for centerfire rifles, a lot of states prohibit more than 5 or 10 rounds in a hunting gun, but never heard of that in a rimfire. Double check that would you? That doesn't sound right but what do I know, I don't live in Penn.

IdealFugacity
August 6, 2012, 08:46 PM
Cannot use a semi-automatic rifle in PA for hunting. I am not a legal expert but believe from what I have read that a semi-automatic shotgun is allowed and a semi-automatic pistol may be carried on your person while hunting as well. In NJ (where I reside when not at the lake home in PA) I can't use a rifle, AT ALL, I probably won't even bother with a hunting license here. I will be taking the PA hunter safety education classes soon.



http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7263/7729516418_5b6959d35a_c.jpg


Had the day off today so I installed my scope, a Nikon 4x32 Prostaff Rimfire, on UTG Leapers .22 mount, set what I believe to be the correct eye relief and put some tape on the shed wall outside in order to "level" the crosshairs vertically and horizontally. I will be able to zero it on Friday at the range. Then I fashioned a workable removable cheek-rest once I figured out that there was no way to hold the rifle with proper form with the scope on there. I stitched some pipe insulation to velcro and glued on a bit of old t-shirt. It's not pretty but it'll work for now. Buy the stuff that matters and DIY the stuff that I can, works with my hobbies.

I am 27 btw, saw a comment about my potential age range above. Young to guns for sure, I got a CCW permit when I lived in Connecticut in '07 but never pursued it, moved to NJ in '09 and immediately got my purchaser ID card and 2 pistol permits but never used those before they expired. Now that I'm rapidly approaching the point where I may have a wife and kids within a couple of years from now, I want to ease us (As a couple) into gun ownership so there's no quarreling about the way we choose to protect our home. She has liked the .22 rifle, next I will be introducing her to a Ruger .22 pistol once I save up for one. I am looking forward to taking the both of us to an Appleseed event (she is excited as a history lover as well) and also NRA safety courses.

HoosierQ
August 7, 2012, 07:32 AM
Sorry man...that was me who suggested, fondly, you may have been "a kid". Well, you're a lot younger than me...but obviously no kid. The amount of pride you've shown in this thread, I think, probably reminded a lot of us of ourselves when we first owned a fine firearm...or maybe got our kids same. Doesn't matter, it's all the same emotion. Still a great rifle. I just got a 10/22 and I am very pleased. My problem in my eyesight. Old eyes and iron sights don't mix. I like that scoped setup you got there.

I maybe an gonna go too far here but I have a suspicion that these hunting restrictions regarding rifles pertain to centerfire rifles...just a hunch...you probably have done your homework. I say this because we here in Indiana were prohibited from hunting with any sort of "rifle" until very recently when they began to allow the use of pistol caliber rifles for deer... .357 magnum or higher. They didn't leave it to chance, they just made a list of calibers acceptable to hunt deer with (.357 magnum, .44, .45 LC, .454 Casull). 7 or 8 years ago the gun racks were filled if .357 and .44 lever guns. Try to find one now!!!

I say this because none of that ever applied to rimfire .22 and nor semi-auto. I'd make sure that .22 rimfire is covered in the "no semi-auto rifle" prohibition. I just can't imagine in a state like Penn, with 400 years of hunting tradition, you can't hunt a squirrel with a Model 60. Just saying.

IdealFugacity
August 7, 2012, 07:36 AM
Yup it applies. People on PAFOA.org (pa firearm owners association) etc have been trying for years to get .22s on an exception list.

HoosierQ
August 7, 2012, 04:36 PM
Wow. That's amazing. Well I guess you'll just have to have fun shooting targets with it...something at which that rifle should excel. I personally don't hunt anymore. I do have rural property that needs caring for and so I do some varmint control and whatnot...rats, raccoons mostly. My go to gun for that is a Savage 24 22mag/20ga over-under.

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