Trigger on Colt 6920


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Shmackey
July 30, 2012, 07:44 PM
Just picked up my Colt LE6920. (Actually it's stamped M4, which is interesting.) It's put together perfectly, and I'm very impressed. One thing, though: the trigger is average at best. I'm probably spoiled by Jewell triggers on bolt actions and nicely done 1911 triggers, but still ... There's enough creep that it feels like a two-stage trigger. Is there anything fairly simple--polishing, springs, magic spells--that can take the trigger to above average?

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Infidel4life11
July 30, 2012, 08:05 PM
Personally I like a good mil-spec trigger. Now some need a little attention usually no more than a good polish and taking out the entire trigger group and giving it a good clean does the job.

taliv
July 30, 2012, 08:22 PM
the trigger is far, far above average in terms of reliability. it is not a match trigger. it is heavy and feels like gravel. anything you do to it to make it feel better is going to reduce the reliability. nothing you do to it is going to make it feel like a jewell or geissele or x-treme. so if you want a match trigger, i'd replace it, and keep the standard one in case you want to put it back sometime

Auto426
July 30, 2012, 08:25 PM
Just picked up my Colt LE6920. (Actually it's stamped M4, which is interesting.)

Colt's new AR's feature the "M4 Carbine, Cal 5.56mm" roll mark on the receiver, there's nothing to worry about.

As far as the trigger goes, Colt uses a military type trigger that isn't setup for a light And crisp trigger pull. AR-15 trigger groups are relatively easy to change out though, and there is no shortage of aftermarket options available.

rcmodel
July 30, 2012, 08:26 PM
GunSlick graphite grease, or Moly grease on the hammer notch, sear, & disconnector + further use to break it in will help a lot.

rc

proven
July 30, 2012, 09:12 PM
shoot it. it'll smooth up over time.

i prefer it's reliability for the way i use the rifle. for a bench or precision ar, i'd likely replace it. but the 6920 isn't a bench or precision gun.

adelbridge
July 30, 2012, 09:43 PM
no grease or break in is going to help that trigger, grease will last one or two trigger pulls and gunk up fast. There is an excess of sear engagement built into milspec triggers for safety at the expense of accuracy. All that extra sear engagement is what you feel as creep. The grit you feel is the coarsely ground engagement surfaces. You can polish up the sear and trigger or just let the metal wear in but dont expect any serious improvements. You can take the lower off, put rubbing compound on the engagement surfaces and dry fire letting the hammer hit a piece of cardboard stuck in there so you dont pound on the receiver metal. I have also seen guys bend the trigger spring angels effectively reducing the tension of the spring and the weight of the trigger pull but lighter springs are cheap and probably more reliable. Depending on your budget you can spend $50-$250 on aftermarket triggers. I use a G-Trigg and a 4lb spring and got satisfactory results. The 4lb spring pretty much wont fire off russian ammo reliably so you make that call. The G-Trigg costs about $65 and has a set screw that basically preloads 80% of creep out of the trigger. It is also polished up so you don't get the grittiness. If you wanted to do it yourself you could drill and tap the receiver under the trigger and put a set screw in your receiver but that takes some level of skill and wont help your resell or collector value. Geissele makes a really nice trigger but you are spending some bucks to get it. His wife started her own woman owned defense company and she puts out ALG branded triggers for $65. Something tells me there aint a whole lot of difference between his and her product lines, probably just renamed for the sake of winning contracts under a female or minority owned contract set aside. I had a Rock River with a RR two stage and it was nice for bench shooting so i could recommend that . I use my AR mostly for hunting so I prefer a single stage. If I had to do it again I would spend the $200 and go with a timney drop in single stage. No messing with all the little parts and springs, just two pins and 5 minutes at most.

C-grunt
July 30, 2012, 11:07 PM
The ALG is supposed to be basically a tuned factory type trigger. Not as good as her husbands triggers but from what Ive heard its pretty good.

Shmackey
July 30, 2012, 11:09 PM
Thanks, everyone. This is a means-business rifle, so I'll leave it alone if reliability is at stake. I think I'm just used to great triggers on serious guns because my carry pistols are 1911s. Or maybe my carry pistols are 1911s because I'm used to great triggers. Chickens and eggs.... :)

OhioChief
July 31, 2012, 12:48 AM
I like two stage triggers. I know you have to spend more, but i rip out the triggers and replace them with RRA two stage trigger. $120 I believe. We've got 5 now, and another build on the way. I've gotten to really like them a lot. And if you haven't already done this, rip off that GI handle and put on a hogue grip. If it's your first AR, don't lose the selector pin or spring when you take the handle off.

Dr.Rob
July 31, 2012, 01:35 AM
My 6920 has the best trigger I've ever had on a centerfire semi automatic rifle.

Of course I'm comparing it to AK's and SKS and Mini 14's and such. That stock AR trigger is MUCH better than those.

Shmackey
July 31, 2012, 01:43 AM
Ok yes, I have to say it's better than an AK trigger. It's also better than a Glock and the caulk gun in my garage. :)

Seriously, this 6920 is terrific. I've never been a big semiauto rifle guy, but this short, light, solid rifle converted me in a hurry.

Dr.Rob
July 31, 2012, 01:47 AM
I wasn't either, until I got a Colt.

Destructo6
July 31, 2012, 09:44 AM
Graphite and aluminium don't mix well.

However, the dab of grease on the hammer notch will help smooth things out.

Captains1911
July 31, 2012, 10:04 AM
As others have said, there is nothing good feeling about a standard GI trigger on the AR-15, but it's very reliable.

RainDodger
July 31, 2012, 10:56 AM
Heh. I also bought a new 6920 a week ago. First range trip was yesterday and the trigger is so bad on this rifle, that it's not going to the range again until I replace it. This is hands down, the worst trigger I've felt on any rifle I've ever purchased. It's a long, creepy pull.

That being said, it IS reliable! :)

taliv
July 31, 2012, 11:54 AM
and if your fundamentals are good, you can still shoot accurately. go shoot the Small Arms Firing School taught by the USAMU at Camp Perry sometime. (it was this past weekend)

you will shoot the national match course with rack grade M16s, some of the worst triggers you've ever felt, beat up, rattling receivers and stocks. they're a mess! yet somehow, a thousand or so n00bs seem to keep most of their shots in the black.

(that said, i'm still a trigger snob and appreciate extremely crisp ones, though i tend to keep at least 3.5 lbs )

RainDodger
July 31, 2012, 04:16 PM
Yes, of course if your fundamentals are good, you can still hit well with a crappy trigger.

If you have the ability though, like most of us here, why not make it better? That's how I look at it. I'm a trigger-snob too. :)

Captains1911
July 31, 2012, 08:35 PM
Yes, of course if your fundamentals are good, you can still hit well with a crappy trigger.

If you have the ability though, like most of us here, why not make it better? That's how I look at it. I'm a trigger-snob too. :)

Because some of us value RELIABILTY over accuracy on rifles of this sort.

rule303
July 31, 2012, 08:51 PM
There is no reason to put up with a totally crappy trigger in the name of reliability. While you won't get the factory trigger to compare with a match unit, you can certainly polish the mating surfaces and make the pull much smoother, and a bit lighter without making the gun one bit less reliable if done right.

rcmodel
July 31, 2012, 08:56 PM
I Still say grease it and shoot it.

No risk of ruining the surface hardening with stones, and you will either like it or be used to it after a few hundred rounds I betcha.

If you want a 3 pound match trigger, you probably should just buy one.

If you want a combat/HD safe AR-15 trigger, you got one, after you use it a while and the "new" wears off.

rc

proven
July 31, 2012, 09:02 PM
rc is right. shooting is the best thing for it. mine was pretty bad when my rifle was new. but fairly quickly smoothed right out. no need for stoning or polishing. it'll do that on it's own as you get used to the rifle and get some rounds downrange.

a-sheepdog
July 31, 2012, 09:18 PM
You can try some K&S Trigger Pins.They should smooth out the trigger a bit, but still won't be match grade.

rcmodel
July 31, 2012, 09:25 PM
You can pay $5.00 bucks extra for the Zombie Green ones too.

And a rough trigger surface will still be a rough trigger surface with green pins.
Until the new wears off.

rc

taliv
July 31, 2012, 10:27 PM
No risk of ruining the surface hardening with stones,

this is why i am not a fan of bubba'd triggers. bubba doesn't know when he has "polished" through the surface and he makes what he thinks is a greatly improved trigger, which works for 300-500 rounds and then suddenly starts doubling.

or more likely, it works for 200 rounds, sits in his closet for a year and then gets sold to some unsuspecting schmoe at a gunshow who is left wondering why his "NIB" colt started doubling after only 100 rounds. hmm...

Matthew Courtney
August 1, 2012, 10:27 AM
Get an ALG ACT trigger and a yellow JP trigger spring. Keep the ALG hammer spring. You will end up with a 5-5.5 pound crisp, reliable trigger.

mljdeckard
August 1, 2012, 10:31 AM
In my experience, break-in helps a lot. I put a .22 conversion on one and shot a bajillion rounds through it, it's MUCH nicer.

Shmackey
November 10, 2012, 02:29 AM
Just following up on this....

I really couldn't stand the stock trigger on this rifle. Every other gun I have has an excellent trigger, and this one was just awful. So I did some research and picked up a Geissele SSA. It's not as light as the SSA-E and is meant for real use, not just bench shooting. The hammer spring feels pretty much like the stock Colt one. But the overall feel of the trigger is fantastic. Unlike the single-stage trigger in my bolt guns, this one feels like a good 1911 trigger. Can't ask for more than that. Plus it dropped right into the gun in about five minutes, and I'm no AR armorer.

It goes to the range tomorrow. :)

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