Buying first Mauser, need basic Mauser-pattern rifle info


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FlaBoy
August 2, 2012, 12:22 PM
Hey guys,

I received my C&R in the mail a few days ago :D:D, and will be making full use of it in the near future. My first purchase will probably be a Nagant revolver (figured a $100 russian nagant revolver would go well with my $100 russian nagant rifle). After that though, I will be buying a Mauser. I've always been a fan of their design, historical impact, impact on future gun designs, etc. The problem is, I know very little about all the different variations of them over the years (chamberings, country of manufacture, length, etc. etc.).

If there is any single resource with a 'beginner's guide' to the Mauser-style rifle, please direct me towards it. I know they were manufactured by the Czechs, the Yugos, ze Germans, I think the Swedes, and probably some other countries I'm forgetting or do not know about (I think the spanish, maybe argentines?). I believe there were at least 3 (probably more?) different cartridges these were chambered for over the years.

I'm looking for a shooter, not necessarily a 'collectors piece'. I'll prioritize cost over rarity or collect-ability. Really, I want a gun that i can take to the range and shoot relatively accurately, but that still looks pretty good. Mostly numbers-matching would be great, but I could care less if it has the super-rare XYZ factory stampings, or the special widget with the slightly different colored bluing that they only used for 2 months production, etc. etc.

Any information you guys have comparing the different options out there for a Mauser-pattern rifle would be much appreciated, and any suggestions as to which one would be a good 'first Mauser' would be welcome too. Thanks for the help!

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Mk VII
August 2, 2012, 02:07 PM
There is Robert W. D. Ball, Mauser Military Rifles of the the World. I didn't think much of the early edition I bought but I gather it's improved since then. The Jerry Kuhnhausen shop manual is pretty good on the technical side of things.

Cal-gun Fan
August 2, 2012, 03:40 PM
I'm going to give an opinion contrary to most here and suggest a Mitchell's Mauser. You say that you want a shooter over a collector's piece, and I think thats the best choice for those requirements.

Cosmoline
August 2, 2012, 04:12 PM
I'd suggest a VZ-24 Czech Mauser in good condition or a Yugo M-48. They're reasonably priced and solid. Since you have a C&R you can buy direct from a wholesaler. Shop around a bit and see what's in stock now. They usually have batches of goodies that come in.

rookorami
August 2, 2012, 05:03 PM
AIM Surplus has some.

http://www.aimsurplus.com/product.aspx?groupid=639&name=Czechoslavakian+vz.+24+8mm+Mauser+Rifle

Owen Sparks
August 2, 2012, 05:06 PM
You can't go wrong with a 6.5 Swedish Mauser as long as it is in good condition. I have never seen one that would not shoot.

Numeric
August 2, 2012, 05:49 PM
I'd say go for a Yugoslav M24/47 or M48, or the Czech Vz. 24. Both can still be had for under $300, and are reliable, well-made and can easily handle any 8mm Mauser/7.92x57mm that you can find to put in them. I picked these because the M98 action, which these are all based on, is the safest of the Mauser actions.

AIM Surplus has Czech Mausers (http://www.aimsurplus.com/product.aspx?groupid=639&name=Czechoslavakian+vz.+24+8mm+Mauser+Rifle) for $289.00.

Samco has M24/47s (http://https://www.samcoglobal.com/1-M24-47.html) in varying condition. Or you could go with a postwar Czech Kar98k (https://www.samcoglobal.com/1-M98k.html). Samco also has a collector's flyer with some of the rarer M98-types, but those are all $400+.

Widener's has M48s (http://www.wideners.com/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=100000268&dir=700|701|1029), and that might be the best place to start, since they were all made post-WW2, and are unlikely to have seen much use.

Stay away from Classic Arms/Classic Firearms. Their customer service is atrocious, and they don't really give a damn about the rifle they are sending you.

Those are the ones you could immediately acquire via online retailer, otherwise, the best place to find them is Gunbroker, or just hunting gun shows. I just bought a Czech Vz.98/22 long rifle for $190 at an auction on Monday, so good deals are still to be had.

Some places to get more info:
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/index.php
http://www.mausercentral.com/index.htm

Red Cent
August 2, 2012, 09:27 PM
The folks here have been making suggestions for me. I think I have pinned it down to the Swedish M94. The short rifle with the full stock really appeals to me and the 6.5 x 55 should lend itself to superb accuaracy with handloading.

snake284
August 2, 2012, 09:56 PM
Hey guys,

I received my C&R in the mail a few days ago :D:D, and will be making full use of it in the near future. My first purchase will probably be a Nagant revolver (figured a $100 russian nagant revolver would go well with my $100 russian nagant rifle). After that though, I will be buying a Mauser. I've always been a fan of their design, historical impact, impact on future gun designs, etc. The problem is, I know very little about all the different variations of them over the years (chamberings, country of manufacture, length, etc. etc.).

If there is any single resource with a 'beginner's guide' to the Mauser-style rifle, please direct me towards it. I know they were manufactured by the Czechs, the Yugos, ze Germans, I think the Swedes, and probably some other countries I'm forgetting or do not know about (I think the spanish, maybe argentines?). I believe there were at least 3 (probably more?) different cartridges these were chambered for over the years.

I'm looking for a shooter, not necessarily a 'collectors piece'. I'll prioritize cost over rarity or collect-ability. Really, I want a gun that i can take to the range and shoot relatively accurately, but that still looks pretty good. Mostly numbers-matching would be great, but I could care less if it has the super-rare XYZ factory stampings, or the special widget with the slightly different colored bluing that they only used for 2 months production, etc. etc.

Any information you guys have comparing the different options out there for a Mauser-pattern rifle would be much appreciated, and any suggestions as to which one would be a good 'first Mauser' would be welcome too. Thanks for the help!

If you're not wanting a collector, I would recommend you try Classic Arms or Samco. Here's Samco's URL: <https://www.samcoglobal.com/1-M24-47.html>

Samco has Yugo 24/47 Barreled actions for $189.95. Not a bad price. I paid $138 and some change for my barreled action and about $160 for my three whole rifles of that model about 3 years back. I'm sporterizing them but leaving one in original condition. I have sporterized two so far, one as a .257 Roberts AI and one is still 8x57. I left that one with it's military 8mm Barrel. But I had the bolts bent, receiver's drilled and tapped, Timney Triggers installed, one has a model 70 style 3 position swing safety and the other a two position Beuler safety. Both have after market firing pin springs which decrease lock time. My smith did a work of art, and I don't use the term loosly on the .257 Bob AI. He made the floor plate on the magazine functional by hinging it and putting a latch on it. It looks like what it is, truly a custom rig. He also milled down the bridge on the receiver where the stripper clip guide is. The 8mm with the Beuler safety cost me $243 Dollars for strictly the sporterization. The .257 Roberts AI was a bit higher because of the fancier safety. Also rebarreling ran the cost up on the .257. Without the scope it cost me around $1500, counting the safety and the Boyd's Stock. I put both rifles in Boyd's Classic Stocks. The .257 is in Walnut and the 8x57 Mauser is in Pepper laminate. The .257 wears a Leupold 3XL 4.5-14x40 and the 8x57 has a Vortex Diamondback 4-12x40. Both scopes are in Leupold Redfield style rings and one piece bases.

Both are shooters.

Yugo's make great hunting rifles.

snake284
August 2, 2012, 10:15 PM
Hey guys,

I received my C&R in the mail a few days ago :D:D, and will be making full use of it in the near future. My first purchase will probably be a Nagant revolver (figured a $100 russian nagant revolver would go well with my $100 russian nagant rifle). After that though, I will be buying a Mauser. I've always been a fan of their design, historical impact, impact on future gun designs, etc. The problem is, I know very little about all the different variations of them over the years (chamberings, country of manufacture, length, etc. etc.).

If there is any single resource with a 'beginner's guide' to the Mauser-style rifle, please direct me towards it. I know they were manufactured by the Czechs, the Yugos, ze Germans, I think the Swedes, and probably some other countries I'm forgetting or do not know about (I think the spanish, maybe argentines?). I believe there were at least 3 (probably more?) different cartridges these were chambered for over the years.

I'm looking for a shooter, not necessarily a 'collectors piece'. I'll prioritize cost over rarity or collect-ability. Really, I want a gun that i can take to the range and shoot relatively accurately, but that still looks pretty good. Mostly numbers-matching would be great, but I could care less if it has the super-rare XYZ factory stampings, or the special widget with the slightly different colored bluing that they only used for 2 months production, etc. etc.

Any information you guys have comparing the different options out there for a Mauser-pattern rifle would be much appreciated, and any suggestions as to which one would be a good 'first Mauser' would be welcome too. Thanks for the help!

One thing about Yugo Mausers or 98Ks is they are stronger than the 96s, 95s and the older ones. You can build a rifle in a modern high pressure cartridge on one where some of the older Mauser designs aren't as strong.

If you enjoyed reading about "Buying first Mauser, need basic Mauser-pattern rifle info" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!