LCR .357 Ranch Carry


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giese
August 30, 2012, 08:55 AM
Elmer Keith made a comment once about carrying on the farm/ranch and being able to stop a bull on top of you or have a chance at shutting down and engine with a well placed shot to the mass of metal. He referenced the .357 due to its abililty have a chance at these functions as well as the ability of the revolver to make a close body contact shot when something large is on you.

I am in this market, farm full time, big machines, spinning shafts, big cows and bulls upto 2000+lbs. On my feet often, in and out of equipment, sit down, stand up, bend, lift, carry etc.

To follow Keiths thoughts I would need to be using some pretty stout ammo for penetration stuff like CORBON 180 hard cast or others. At least a few of the 5 rounds in the cylinder would need to be this, maybe shoots 2 and 3 of 5. I would carry a much more reasonable 2 legged defense round when not on the ranch or in the remainder of the cylinder or for smiting the ocassional opportune pest critter around the place such as a coyote in range or garden destroying rabbit.


Would the LCR handle these heavy rounds at all? I would not be shooting these heavy rounds for fun on a normal range session but I would want to try a few (3 or so) to be prepared from time to time. Normal practise with LCR would be .38 or light .357.

Also I have a 4" GP100 when I want to enjoy the big rounds. I have always assumed I would get an SP101 but the newer LCR and its ease of carry would be key for my somewhat active lifestyle.

Any suggestions and thoughts would be great.

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JohnM
August 30, 2012, 09:54 AM
Tractors gone bad! :what:
I think I'd want something along the lines of a 75mm anti tank gun.
Not sure how many Wally Worlds carry the ammo though.

BSA1
August 30, 2012, 10:01 AM
Can the Ruger LCR handle hot loads? Absolutely. Ruger handguns are famous for being overengineered.

Can the shooter handle shooting hot loads out of a small, lightweight revolver? Depends on the experience level of the shooter.

Can the shooter overcome the small sight and heavy recoil of the 357 magnum to actually hit what they are aiming at, especailly a small kill zone at distance? Practice, practice, practice.

I am only a hobby rancher compared to you but the most useful gun I have found is the Colt Single Action Revolver. Build a smaller frame than the large frame heavy Rugers SA it packs the punch of the 45 Colt. I can mix the loads with shotshells for rattlers and anything in between.

RaceM
August 30, 2012, 10:37 AM
Think I'd stick with the 4" GP. Hot loads out of a light gun are no fun and you'd need to practice enough to get good with 'em. I carry my 6" GP on the tractor sometimes and it ain't that bad, but the 4" would likely be much better (no need for the leg tie down).

lloveless
August 30, 2012, 10:56 AM
I have been a farmer, though not now. I carried a 4 inch gp-100 then, but I have a sp-101 with a 3 inch barrel, and wish I'd had it then. Lighter and fairly accurate to 25 yds. It will handle the corbon 200 grs with no problem. I still have one Billy E. Goat that gets uppity at times-spooky and unpredictable. I feel much better with the sp in a bianchi belt slide strong side carry. Good luck in your quest. I usually carry 158gr lswc over 13.5 grs 2400. Or Remington 125gr jsp.
ll

jmorris
August 30, 2012, 11:13 AM
I generally carry an STI vip in 9mm at our farm but I use the key to kill the engines on equipment and you can pet our bull, we also sell any cows that don't act right.

Although almost as rare as an evil run away tractor, I am more likely to come across a catfish eating snake and it is enough gun to put them both out of their misery at the same time.

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/farm/HPIM0268.jpg

adelbridge
August 30, 2012, 01:45 PM
polymer will hold up better after years of sweat.

firesky101
August 30, 2012, 04:40 PM
I have the KLCR, and it has been quite durable with hot loads. I equate the recoil impluse as similar to a k-frame. That being said I would carry a longer barrel if possible. .357 gains a lot from just a couple of inches, and that might matter on a pissed off bull ( I have never tried to put a bull down so no experience on how tough they are). As for an engine block, anything that pierces the radiator will stop it eventually, but nothing short of .308AP and larger will put it down right now with any reliablility.

giese
August 30, 2012, 06:15 PM
I wonder if run away tractors trump Zombies? A more reasonable scenario may be your in a corn bin and pant leg gets stuck in the sweep auger, a few rounds with a .357 may stop that couple horsepower electric motor, all within 30 ft usually.

And yes I agree calm cattle are better, all our stock cows(mamas) are easy to handle but they can be spooked too by something small. And if you have ever got a load of 100 head of 6-700 lbers out of Idaho that havent seen a human or a fence until they day they were rounded up and put on trucks, well sometimes when they come off the trucks they dont stop until they hit something!

Good thoughts so far from you all, keep them coming, I havent posted on here for a few years as I hav ebeen busy, still lots of class here. I still am not sure but I am going to the gun shop tomorrow and leaving with an SP101 or an LCR .357. Right now I am thinking LCR due to ease of carry every day with a belt and pockets full of other crap such as smartbrick(phone), leatherman, nuts, bolts, flashlight, widgets, wallet etc. And I dont feel I will use those hot loads often.

Coyote3855
August 30, 2012, 08:46 PM
I'm not a full-time rancher anymore, but still have 50 acres in the country. My favorite carry for a long time was a 2 3/4" Ruger Speed Six stainless. Actually killed a few ground squirrels with it. Never felt the need for hot .357s. Now my bang around pistol is a KelTec PRM 30. 31 rounds of .22 magnum seem to be plenty of firepower. But I haven't been charged by a bull for about 40 years, and no PTO on the Kubota.

giese
August 30, 2012, 09:22 PM
Just so everyone knows, I am not in the bull killing business on a regular basis, at low priced bulls going for $2500 and expensive ones going for ten times that it is not good business. I usually prefer to step aside and smack them in the nose with a sorting stick when they get a bit rambunctious. But things can happen, back in my late teens had a good cow get me cornered, backed up between the bucket of the loader and the front tire, she got me on my back and it didnt look good. She didnt like me vaccinating her calf that day. Good thing a wise and fast fella, my Dad, was near by to persuade her to turn her attention elsewhere. Had I been by myself had a sufficient revolver we might have had some fresh ground beef as a last resort.

sidheshooter
August 30, 2012, 09:47 PM
Now that is a serious pit viper. Who made your IWB? It looks like Elmer at the Leather Arsenal...

That or his old boss, Sparks.




http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/farm/HPIM0268.jpg

CZF
August 31, 2012, 02:44 AM
I think a 158 gr. SWC or JHP would be OK in a LCR .357 Magnum,
and give you a light package to carry all day.
http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/DOUBLE%20%20TAP/1575759666.jpg
I've shot some 38+P 158s out of my two LCRs, but no SWCs.

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/DOUBLE%20%20TAP/1575758666.jpgSome people will tell you that a SWC is ideal for both dangerous humans and
animals. Esp. in a open enviroment where you don't have to worry much
about over-pen.

The 158 .357 Magnum Soft Points and JHPs out of my SP-101 were seemingly powerful.
Enough that I used them as my outdoor ammo.http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/Rugers/1351072905.jpg

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/Rugers/13950604c1.jpg
Same ammo out of my Ruger Speed Six was much tamer.
http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/Rugers/kev357-2.jpg

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/czrami/Rugers/Ruger%20Speed%20Six%20357%20Magnum/rugerspeedsix1.jpg
best of luck with your eventual .357 magnum purchase.

One_Jackal
August 31, 2012, 05:53 AM
The thing about a .357 mag is short barrels don't flatter it. I can really tell the difference between my blackhawk 6" and Dan Wesson 10". The 10" barrel is like shooting a hand rifle. After shooting guns that have a realistic 50 yard range I would run the 2" model over with the tractor.

Cocked & Locked
August 31, 2012, 07:24 AM
The thing about a .357 mag is short barrels don't flatter it.

Is any handgun cartridge "flattered" by short barrels? :scrutiny: I can't think of one.

jmorris
August 31, 2012, 07:39 AM
Is any handgun cartridge "flattered" by short barrels? I can't think of one. I think what he was trying to say is that .357 has more to gain/loose than others because of case volume and powders that can be used. For example out of a carbine the 357 is much more powerfull than you could ever get out of a 2" barrel. The .25acp on the other hand won't have near the difference out of a 2" or 20" barrel.

Rexster
August 31, 2012, 10:55 AM
A .357 might have been able to save that Texas mayor who was killed on his ranch by a large male donkey recently. (Unless, of course, an initial blow was disabling.) As for the weapon, itself, unless deep concealment is an urgent need, why a snubby for ranch carry? Three-plus inches is my idea of a general utility revolver, and the new 4" SP101 has my attention, wishing my budget could accomodate it, without having to trade. (I have a 3" SP101, and three with 2.25" barrels.)

I have fired the Federal CastCore 180-grain non-jacketed load without pain in a 2.25" Ruger SP101.

Shovelhead
August 31, 2012, 03:30 PM
I carry a 4" GP in a cyclone cross-draw holster.
Not too heavy, and stays out of the way until I might need it.
YMMV

rcmodel
August 31, 2012, 03:41 PM
Elmer Keith made a comment once about carrying on the farm/ranch and being able to stop a bull on top of you or have a chance at shutting down and engine with a well placed shot to the mass of metal. He referenced the .357 due to its ability Elmer referenced that in many of his writings.

But he didn't say to use a .357 for it.
He considered the .357 to be the best of the "small bores", and suitable mostly for long range target practice and killing jack rabbits!

He was a big proponent of big bore revolvers for any mad bull or engine stopping use.

His recommendations for a minimum caliber was always at least a hot loaded .44 Spl, if not a .44 Magnum.

He said if he had to make do with only one factory loaded caliber for all of it, it would be a .45 Colt.

rc

ArchAngelCD
August 31, 2012, 05:32 PM
I would carry the GP-100 over the LCR any day for what you need doing. Buy yourself a good belt holster that will carry the weight easily and you are set.

If I were buying a new revolver I would choose a Vaquero or Blackhawk in 45 Colt instead. There is very little that can go wrong with a Ruger SA revolver so it will be there if you need it! Second choice with be the same revolvers in 38/357.

Manny
August 31, 2012, 06:28 PM
For all day carry, other than maybe the 3" model I think a GP100 is too heavy. If you want a 4" barrel than the SP is available with that' as well as 3" and the 2.25" versions. Getting back to the LCR, I did a bit of looking around the internet and saw some chronographed velocities using Federal 180gr castcore ammo in a J-frame 17/8" barrel where observed velocity was a little over 900fps. That strikes me as a very effective load for penetration in a easily tote-able LCR. Using the std Houge grip, my thinking the recoil will be stiff but tolerable.

I'd like to see Ruger offer the LCR with a 3" barrel and some upgraded sights ala S&W Night Guards. With a bit more weight to tame recoil such a gun would be superb trail gun IMHO.

TexasPatriot.308
August 31, 2012, 06:38 PM
I am around cattle every day, you learn which cows are a little "crazy" real quick and which bulls can turn on you (all of them). if you are an experienced rancher/cattleman, you dont carry a pistol to kill them, you just use common sense, a hotshot, bullwhip or a 2x4 if you need one....cattle are too expensive to go in with a mentality of "kill it if it turns on you"

giese
August 31, 2012, 07:04 PM
Texas- Agreed with much of what you said, see my post from later yesterday. I am not claiming to be a cattle expert but have been working some cows for a few years.... In my world I would have a better chance of meeting my end from a 4 legged crazed critter I am working by myself that gets me down than 2 legged, I cant have a babysitter in this line of work all the time. Probably better chance of that than most folks on THR, other than law enforcment, have of meeting a bad situation with 2 legged. So the majority of folks on here carry with less of a chance of being injured/maimed/killed than I do, I would say you might want to change your plan and keep something on you. Just playing the odds.

RC- Thanks for the correction, my reference was to an article I read by Ayoob many years ago in which he cited Keith, I ask forgiveness for my error. After you corrected me I seemed to have much more recollection of the article and you are correct in what you said, thanks again, I dont want to misrepresent Keith or lead folks astray by my ignorance and that was not my intention. Kudos for your gun history knowledge. THR has some pretty competent folks.

So.... in conclusion... Went to the store... Picked up a nice 2" SP101 for myself... Liked the heft, ruggedness, and trigger is similar to my GP100. I will grab some holster selections over the next few weeks and be happy I believe. But I just didnt like leaving that LCR.... So Mrs. giese took one in .38+p home with her, she was very pleased with the trigger, probably get some static for this but she liked the Colt Detective we had an opportunity to fire a few weeks back and she said it felt simialr in her had. Her purse will be much the wiser for this choice I hope... and smiles were had all around....

Thanks for advice, now ammo and holsters are on my mind........

JohnM
August 31, 2012, 07:05 PM
Perzackly.

kbbailey
August 31, 2012, 07:52 PM
giese
Like you, I am a farmer. I spend most of my time outdoors for work and play. I also chose a SP101 as a 'round the farm, why are the dogs barking?, 4-whlr riding, tractor driving, flyfishing gun. I have had mine for a couple years now, and have been well pleased.

I chose a Don Hume IWB holster. It is inexpensive, but fits the gun like a glove. It also conceals well, and can be shoved in the front pocket of my jeans for a quick trip out the door. I recommend it too.

Don't know what it's like where u are....but our corn is making 2-12bu/a. Normally 160-180bu/a.

rswartsell
August 31, 2012, 08:06 PM
Try the Buffalo Bore HC 180 gr. gas check. Pricey, but I like it.

P.S. My best wishes and prayers for all farmers and ranchers, this is gonna get tough. They are still the nation's backbone.

giese
August 31, 2012, 08:47 PM
Bailey- I have heard things are rough in your area, funny.... I dont think the profarmer tour goes that far south, to far from CHICAGO and the CBOT....

I am in NE IOWA... I told a guy the other day "Most years you drive by your neighbors corn and say I hope mine is better than his.... THis year you say I hope his is better than mine" And you mean it, there is a lot at stake here I think. A neighbor told me the other day "I just cant feed those cows $8 corn because it turns to $6 corn as soon as it goes in their mouth..." Fed cattle placements down, cow heard down. Guess they can raise beef in Argentina on grass and ship it here... How is that for food security for ya.

We have some pretty good soil around here and an I will be gitty if we average 140 accross the whole place, normal year should be 170+. Chopped 40 acres 14 miles away the last week, hauled all the way home trying to make lemonade out of lemons... Lighter soil, insurance agent apprasied it yesterday at 36.9bu/acre. Will try and grow some cattle on that. Bean are still question mark but we will be running a combine in the next 2 weeks on corn or bean, that is pretty early around here.

Everybody says to me "How ya doing with the drought? you gonna be okay?" I say "Yeah... It is you I am worried about, the grocery store has the potential to knock you down soon, I grow alot of my own grub."

To keep this gun related.... I will most definitily check out the Don at your recommendation. And the affirmation of the 101 is encouraging after dropping the dough...

FMF Doc
August 31, 2012, 08:54 PM
I think the LCR will handle the load you mentioned, but I wouldn't feed it a regular diet of that stuff. Also, the short barrel will not come close to maximizing the potential, so really, you'll be wasting a lot of powder and making a really loud bang. A 3" bbl SP101 would be a MUCH better choice, and if it were me...I'd be carrying the GP100, even it it took some effort.

rswartsell
August 31, 2012, 08:55 PM
Give the BB 180 a try too.

back40
August 31, 2012, 09:29 PM
you made a good choice with the sp101. i like the lcr too but i think the sp will serve you better and be more rugged for years to come.

here's another vote for the BB 180s. they're a hoot!

jmorris
August 31, 2012, 09:43 PM
Now that is a serious pit viper. Who made your IWB? It looks like Elmer at the Leather Arsenal... IIRC its a Galco Royle I traded something for years ago, it's for a full size but the short ones fit in it just as well.

treg
August 31, 2012, 09:46 PM
I'd recommend the 4" SP101 or the 3" S&W M60, either with the available adjustable sights. Kinda nice to hit where your aiming when the vermin are small and nice to have a prayer with the 'yotes at 50+ yards. After missing and passing up some shots I've mostly switched from my 2" snubbie to a larger adjustable sight gun. Lazers coming soon for those fading daylight shots on the vermin.

Power wise? Last spring I had a 600 lb heifer get out, couldn't catch her. As dark approached I told my neighbor we'd better shoot if we find her. He got her with one shot to the head at 50 yards, .357 mag, 125 gr HP, 2" Taurus M605. Non-ideal combo? Yup. Lucky? Yup, but a good story. First thing I've ever seen him hit with that gun, ha ha.

ETA: And handloading helps too. You can economically maximize your pistols inherent accuracy with the best bullets for it's intended jobs (JHP, JSP, LSWC etc). And you can build accurate, economical plinking loads to build long range skill.

FMF Doc
August 31, 2012, 10:21 PM
I'd recommend the 4" SP101 or the 3" S&W M60, either with the available adjustable sights. Kinda nice to hit where your aiming when the vermin are small and nice to have a prayer with the 'yotes at 50+ yards.

I like the longer barrels and thus better sight raduis, but if you are going to the 4" bbl, you might as well upgrade the frame and get that 6th or 7th round. There is not a huge difference between a 4" SP101 and GP100 when you actually carry them. It may seem like it on paper, but trust me, having carried both, there isn't much diffence.

Confederate
August 31, 2012, 11:36 PM
Well, I sure wouldn't recommend the LCR for ranch use at all. It recoils way too much for any legitimate use I can think of.

I have a friend who killed a rabid mountain lion while he was out inspecting fence posts. He used a Dan Wesson he kept in a shoulder rig. And when I was out on the same ranch, we used .22s to kill the prairie dogs at the behest of our host.

For ranch use, get a good mint Ruger Speed-Six in stainless steel. It's not the boat anchor that the GP-100 is and it strikes an outstanding balance between power and portability. The .357 is my favorite caliber, but the Security-/Speed-Six was the perfect vehicle for that round. So, too, were the S&W 66 and 65 revolvers. The Ruger LCR has a 1.82-inch barrel length, which is ridiculous. For each inch of barrel length after an inch, the round picks up considerable power. I have a 2.25-inch Ruger SP-101, but that's still too small for ranch use. The 2.75-inch or 3-inch Speed-Six or the 4-inch Security-Six is really ideal. And rubber grips without the metal insides (such as the type Pachmayrs have) keep the weight down even more.

The Smith 686 and Ruger GP-101 revolvers are simply too heavy for my taste, but the 686 is much better balanced due to its steel grips. The earlier models were perfect for range use, but horrible for carrying. Bill Jordan, who recommended the 13/19/65/66, knew that people carried guns more than shot them. Somewhere along the line Smith and Ruger lost sight of that. I suppose they figured since police departments were switching to autos, that everyone would be shooting at ranges. Big mistake. I'd love to have a mint 66 earlier model. The 6-inch versions of the Ruger/Smith were considered the perfect ranch/hunting guns. After the heavier models came out, articles extolling their values as ranch/hunting guns took a nose dive.

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh198/jriler/RugerSecurity-SixTrio_2.jpg

The Ruger trio are great ranch guns. You can still get them on the
used gun market.


http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh198/jriler/SW66.jpg

The S&W 66 also is ideal as a ranch gun. I prefer the earlier models.


http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh198/jriler/Ruger_SS_Assembly_1.jpg

The Rugers have a modular design that makes them stronger than the Smiths.

.

Rexster
September 1, 2012, 10:57 AM
giese, congratulations on your purchases. "Heft" is one of the things I, too, like about the SP101.

Cocked & Locked
September 1, 2012, 11:04 AM
giese, congratulations on your purchases. "Heft" is one of the things I, too, like about the SP101.

Same here!

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6263277/403795547.jpg

Ratshooter
September 1, 2012, 11:52 AM
Years ago Ross Seyfreid wrote an article about using a snubby 38 to finish wounded elk. He loaded his gun with Speer Lawman ammo. He said the bullets only made it to the skull of an elk and then flattened out. He said he went back to what always worked. A hard cast SWC Keith style bullet. He tested these on fresh leg bones and said they shattered the bones into fragments. His son used the load on an elk and reported it worked very well.

I agree and prefer these myself. I like penetration. I can't offer any personal experience on shooting cattle so thats why I related the RS story. I have shot a goat with a hard cast 158 medium 357 load at about 1100fps. Just as I shot the goat took off. I hit it in the back of the left leg. The bullet exited through the right shoulder blade. It cut a perfect circle in the clavicle. The goat fell over dead right there.

back40
September 1, 2012, 03:45 PM
cocked and locked, that's a great looking sp! what grip is that?

Cocked & Locked
September 1, 2012, 03:56 PM
cocked and locked, that's a great looking sp! what grip is that?
Those are Pachmayr Compaq grips on the SP101. I removed the Pachmayr medallions and replaced them with Ruger medallions.

back40
September 1, 2012, 04:22 PM
nice!:cool:

treg
September 1, 2012, 11:12 PM
I like the longer barrels and thus better sight raduis, but if you are going to the 4" bbl, you might as well upgrade the frame and get that 6th or 7th round. There is not a huge difference between a 4" SP101 and GP100 when you actually carry them. It may seem like it on paper, but trust me, having carried both, there isn't much diffence.

When you are working (actual physical labor requiring movement and exertion, unfamiliar to many) or operating a piece of equipment that requires movement to operate, every little bit of not much extra gun tends to get in your way. BTDT. Hence the recommendation for a smaller gun.

Steve C
September 1, 2012, 11:48 PM
Handgun on the farm or ranch while working may have had some merit in the early 1900's when you may have to shoot a horse that's on top of you, however in a mechanized farm or ranch I see little to no need for it unless you run into dangerous trespassers, pot cultivators using your property or other 2 legged varmints. To carry a handgun because you think you may need to shoot your valuable equipment or breeding stock then rethink your safety habits.

Every farmer or rancher I ever knew carried a rifle or shotgun in the pickup when working to dispatch varmints, predators, stray dogs, injured stock, and that also provided for the self defense needs they had. They only carried a handgun when traveling, esp to sales or auctions when they had large sums of cash. The only rancher I ever met that carried a handgun was also a Sheriffs deputy and it stayed in the glove box most of the time only coming out when he had to go to a call.

lloveless
September 2, 2012, 12:42 AM
SteveC wrote: "To carry a handgun because you think you may need to shoot your valuable equipment or breeding stock then rethink your safety habits." The gun at your side is a part of the risk assessment, and a safety device. When a Ram or bull decides to go berserk for what ever reason and is between you and the truck who ya gonna call? That is why we carry.
ll

RaceM
September 2, 2012, 10:22 AM
Yup, this ain't the 1900's. Now we only gots to worry about occupy squatters, nut jobs off their meds, and deppities that always seem to be on the other side of the county when ya really need them. I'll keep carrying.

giese
September 2, 2012, 10:24 AM
I will say that I live in a nationally recognized area of meth cooking activity which also spurs a person to feel the need to carry. But, I believe it is just as comical to think that I would open fire on the first meth cooker I encounter on our property as it is to think I would use a firearm as a primary safety mechanism when working on our +$300,000 combine or when sorting out a bull. What I am taking away most from this discussion, other than great suggestions on firearms and ammunition, is that our country has become increasingly obtuse to the ag/food production system.

There is an economics of scale involved here. For our size operation we have to assume a certain level or risk in our design and construction of livestock handling facilities based upon our economics. Yes, we could have better sorting and gating facilities’ for cattle that would reduce the exposure of people to risk, but this comes at a cost that may be impractical. The firearm could be considered as part of this risk assessment. Much like levees in LA, the Corp can build the biggest and bestest levee system in the world that would be able to handle all possible storms but this is economically impractical and they and every citizen in the area assume a level of risk when living there.

We could be venturing into Strat and Tac here so Mods, cut me off if I am being a nuisance. I like this discussion though…

Hope to get out to the range today with the kids and wife to practice my extremely mediocre firearms skills with our new acquisitions. Hope to post my thoughts later.

Rexster
September 2, 2012, 12:29 PM
Enjoy your SP101! Remember to hold that beastie high on the grip, to reduce muzzle flip.

AKMtnRunner
September 2, 2012, 01:58 PM
you made a good choice with the sp101. i like the lcr too but i think the sp will serve you better and be more rugged for years to come.

here's another vote for the BB 180s. they're a hoot!
In my new 4" SP101, I tried those BB 180's for the first time the other day and they made the traditional factory 357 loadings feel like 38+p. My trigger hand actually jumped out of my support hand and usually it's only the hottest 500 S&W loads that do that. Now I know just to take a different grip for those.

It's hard to imagine an LCR supporting a load like that. So if you feel that that kind of load is appropriate, the SP101 or larger is definitely the way to go.

grendelbane
September 2, 2012, 02:27 PM
I am not a farmer, but I do live in a rural area. I have owned an SP101, and currently own an LCR, though mine is in .38 Special.

For your purposes, I would choose the SP101. While both will handle the .357, the human part is going to find the LCR much more brutal, due to its lighter weight. I have come to the conclusion that the repetition of recoil of hard kicking handguns is cumulative. It might not hurt for the first few years, but after decades it builds up.

Size is similar, in fact holsters are similar. I think the LCR is great for .38+p loads intended for 2 legged varmints. For .357 level loads I want some thing heavier.

jmorris
September 3, 2012, 12:45 AM
The Rugers have a modular design that makes them stronger than the Smiths. The extra weight in steel helps out too.

Manny
September 3, 2012, 01:29 AM
Texas- Agreed with much of what you said, see my post from later yesterday. I am not claiming to be a cattle expert but have been working some cows for a few years.... In my world I would have a better chance of meeting my end from a 4 legged crazed critter I am working by myself that gets me down than 2 legged, I cant have a babysitter in this line of work all the time. Probably better chance of that than most folks on THR, other than law enforcment, have of meeting a bad situation with 2 legged. So the majority of folks on here carry with less of a chance of being injured/maimed/killed than I do, I would say you might want to change your plan and keep something on you. Just playing the odds.

RC- Thanks for the correction, my reference was to an article I read by Ayoob many years ago in which he cited Keith, I ask forgiveness for my error. After you corrected me I seemed to have much more recollection of the article and you are correct in what you said, thanks again, I dont want to misrepresent Keith or lead folks astray by my ignorance and that was not my intention. Kudos for your gun history knowledge. THR has some pretty competent folks.

So.... in conclusion... Went to the store... Picked up a nice 2" SP101 for myself... Liked the heft, ruggedness, and trigger is similar to my GP100. I will grab some holster selections over the next few weeks and be happy I believe. But I just didnt like leaving that LCR.... So Mrs. giese took one in .38+p home with her, she was very pleased with the trigger, probably get some static for this but she liked the Colt Detective we had an opportunity to fire a few weeks back and she said it felt simialr in her had. Her purse will be much the wiser for this choice I hope... and smiles were had all around....

Thanks for advice, now ammo and holsters are on my mind........
Nice job of matching the right tool to the job. The SP ought to be superb for your use with stout loads and the LCR should be terrific for Ms G for CCW. I've had my SP for quite a few years now and it's still my favorite small frame revolver for shooting. Other guns might carry easier but none combine the portability and shootability especially with heavy loads as well as the SP. I still want to get an LCR for carry but my SP will likely stay just 'cause it's such a sweet shooting and handy gun.

spotch
September 4, 2012, 07:47 PM
After working on my dad's farm, I was going to recommend a KLCR or the shortest barrel SP101 you could find, glad to see you got one of the two :) I love the GP100 to death, but if I have to carry it around doing farm work and stuff, fuggedabadit lol. Every bit of extra barrel length over the LCR will help get you the velocity/energy you'd want against a 1500+ pound animal.

I may have missed it, but have you settled on carry ammo for it yet? If you're thinking of stopping large animals, maybe you'd want something like a flat nose semi wadcutter (tissue damage + penetration)?

460Kodiak
September 5, 2012, 10:08 AM
I'd want more barrel than an LCR will offer. The GP is a better option. Having been chased by a bull before, I'd sooner step it up to a .44 mag.

herkyguy
September 5, 2012, 01:50 PM
I don't go on my land without my GP100 6" in a crossdraw holster. It's heavy, but I deal with it. I like the longer barrel with a fiber optic front sight for reaching out and touching nasty snakes at a distance.

giese
September 5, 2012, 09:42 PM
Carry ammo, I picked up some Hornday Critical defence for Mrs. G and my self in .38 and .357 but that was just because that was all the shop had. I am still working though the possiabilites and some more range time is needed to help with the my thought process. We had some time to go out to the back 40 and fire off some rounds. I was very pleased with the SP with .38, very manageable, stacked some rounds in a 2" group at a bit over 10 yards. Mrs. G kept hers on the plate but admitted more practise is needed. She was concerned with muzzel flip, when we get more time we need to try some new techniques, mainly keeping her hand higher on the grip. Maybe some body repositioning as well, any other suggestions for her? THe LCR does not have a slight indent on the upper portion of the grip like the factory SP grip. The grip on the LCR kind of sticks out and makes it hard for her to keep her hand high and reach trigger comfortably.

I put some winchester .357 throught he SP and could manage but follow up was slow and I am going to have to practise more to become proficient. Probably not going to go to those BB 180's or Corbon 180 or 200's just yet! Does anybody make a hardcast SWC in a 158 or 125 with a standard .357 mag load until I get a bit more proficient?

kbbailey
September 5, 2012, 10:11 PM
Sometimes I carry my sp101 stoked with 2rds of cci shotshells and 3rds of 158gr cast keith style bullets. It makes a good combination when river fishing, mushroom hunting, etc.

Manny
September 6, 2012, 01:39 AM
Buffalo Bore makes a 158gr .38+p Outdoorsman load that looks like a dandy, hard cast Keith bullet that should do just over 1000fps out of your SP.

https://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=288

Also the Federal Castcore 180 gr .357 load is loaded lighter than the BB stuff, should do between 900 & 1000 fps out of your SP from what I've read.

tomrkba
September 6, 2012, 06:14 PM
Ruger Alaskan! The 2 1/2" barrel makes it easy to deploy and you still get 44 Magnum ballistics. If that's too much, then 44 Special is available. You can always load your own lighter 44 Magnum rounds.

http://i1205.photobucket.com/albums/bb425/tomrkba/firearms/revolvers/Ruger-Alaskan/Ruger-Alaskan-more-muzzle.jpg

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