Bead Blast Cylinder Damage


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dsfo302v03
September 11, 2012, 09:21 PM
Ok guys, I bought a bead blaster and cabinet over the weekend and decided to refinish several of my S&W revolvers. I was careful to disasemble each one and properly protect the bores and crowns. The finish came out perfect! However, here's the catch... I didn't protect the chambers in the cylinders. I know I could have shoved a cotten ball in each one...but I didn't (kicks himself). Here's my question for all the experienced revolver guys, do you think I created any damage? I can see that the edges in each cylinder are now matte vs being shiny. I can't see how it would affect them, but then again there's a lot I don't know. My OCD is kicking in here I guess....

Thanks!!!

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tryshoot
September 11, 2012, 09:25 PM
Chambers have to be within specs. If they are you can polish. Do not go below spec. Extraction may be a problem with rough chamber.

Jim K
September 11, 2012, 09:29 PM
Lesson learned?

OK, if the damage is in the front of the chamber, you have created a place where lead and bullet jacket material can build up, requiring more cleaning. If the damage is at the rear, you might experience hard extraction if case brass expands into the rough area.

It might be possible to polish out the rough area(s) but I would shoot the gun first and see if there is a problem before doing anything more.

Jim

dsfo302v03
September 11, 2012, 10:39 PM
@Jim yes lesson learned. I guess the worst case scenario is that I'll need to buy new cylinders. The cost isn't out of the question. We'll see.

Thanks to both responses.

788Ham
September 11, 2012, 11:30 PM
I know you're kicking yourself in the butt, glad they aren't my guns!

Control
September 12, 2012, 01:08 AM
You shouldn't lose more than a few thousandths by polishing out the damage.

http://www.ktgunsmith.com/polish_chambers.HTML

Make sure to measure your chambers (front and back) after you polish correctly to make sure you are within spec. Specs are available online. Just search for your model number on Bing or Google.

This should be easily repairable unless you were heavy handed with the blaster.

dsfo302v03
September 12, 2012, 11:14 AM
Thanks!

dsfo302v03
September 12, 2012, 11:16 AM
I know you're kicking yourself in the butt, glad they aren't my guns!
I'm suprised that someone hasn't said they were beyond repair and doomed, so send them their way to properly dispose of ;)

19-3Ben
September 12, 2012, 12:25 PM
Well I didn't want to be a jerk, but if you are looking to get rid of them....

Old Fuff
September 12, 2012, 12:37 PM
If you were bead-blasting (as opposed to sand-blasting) you probably aren't in trouble. Before you do anything else, fire them and see if any problems come up. Fortunately they probably won't.

If they do, Brownells (www.brownells.com) sell chamber hones that you use with an adjustable speed electric drill or drill press. If you buy a hone(s) be sure to also buy the honing oil that should be used with it. Unless the chambers are substantially oversized in the first place honing won't hurt them.

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