Tree stand height/distance


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beeb173
September 20, 2012, 03:05 PM
i did a search and most people here and elsewhere on the internet say @15 ft for height so my question really is what is the ideal distance for the shot at 15 feet high? in other words, how far away from the base of my tree do i set the attractant so i have the best possible angle?

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desidog
September 20, 2012, 03:31 PM
Deer don't have natural predators coming at them from above - so they don't need to check above them. As long as you're above where they're looking you're OK.

As for distance, IMO, as far away as you feel comfortable taking an ethical shot.

Some people only practice on level ground. Then they wonder why the miss high or low when shooting angles from a tree stand. ...once you set up your stand take some practice/ranging shots from it. That'll tell you a lot.

BBQLS1
September 20, 2012, 05:03 PM
I haven't used doe pee or any of the other stuff, but you just need them to be in the clear where you can get a good shot at their vitals. Angle doesn't matter so much.

You just need to evaluate your terrain.

BTW, Deer do look upwards.... especially if they catch a little motion in their peripheral vision. It's not normally where they are looking though. To be honest, motion is really what they see. I've stood right in front of a buck (very still) and he didn't regard me much.

I've also been stared at by a buck looking slightly up a hill at me and didn't pay me much mind.... but he did sniff a bit. That's when he got wary.

beeb173
September 20, 2012, 07:12 PM
Maybe I need to put it another way. Is ten feet too close?

buck460XVR
September 20, 2012, 07:45 PM
It depends on what kind of attractant, whether you are using gun or bow and what your intended quarry is. If it is a food attractant such as a bait pile, you'll want it at a distance no farther than you are comfortable and proficient shooting at. The animal will stop at the bait pile and has no reason to come any closer. Same goes for using a decoy, never set it out farther than you can make a good clean kill shot. This will vary depending on weapon used. In open woods using a rifle one can comfortably place the bait 50 -60 yards away and have more latitude getting away with movement and scent. Using a bow or handgun one should probably keep the bait within 20-30 yards. Using attractant scents based on estrous urine or dominate buck urine is different as many times, mature deer will circle downwind 50-60 yards, stop and watch to see if they can see the animal producing the scent before coming in. When they don't see the animal producing the scent they may move on without coming any closer. Put the scent 10 yards downwind of your stand and the animal will hang up far outta bow range. Young bucks will generally run right in unless they have been pressured and educated by other hunters using too much scent too early or improperly. In areas like this is is better to use sex attractant type scents far upwind of your stand. You don't want to be directly downwind but 15-20 degrees off to one side or the other. This way the animal will be focused on the attractant scent and circle into you without getting your scent. Using the wind and natural funnels and or a natural barrier such as a river, lake or deep swamp will help guide the animal to you. Mock scrapes sometimes work as well as regular bait, but again, many times the older bucks, if they have been pressured, will hang back downwind for a considerable time before coming in.

Captcurt
September 20, 2012, 07:51 PM
I usually try to set up 20 to 25 yards and set my stand 12 to 15' up. Most of my archery shots are inside of 20 yards. Then when gun season comes in I have a tendency to set up too close. They have heard the safety click off.

For a gun 15-20' works well provided you have a good view. Early season hunts sometimes dictate a lower stand for visibility under the vegitation.

adelbridge
September 21, 2012, 03:56 PM
I have been busted drawing back on my bow many times at 15' and 20 yards. The other thing to consider if bow hunting is the angle of entry for the arrow. Inside of 20 yards and 15' you have to aim pretty high on the rib cage to get both lungs. If you put your shot right over the shoulder at 10 yards and 15' you will likely only hit one lung and have the arrow exit the sternum due tot he steep angle.

beeb173
September 23, 2012, 12:16 PM
Sorry, I should have specified bow and that I was concerned about entry/exit angles. I don't know how much farther than 20 yards I'd want to set up. 30 yards is about my maximum w/ 35 being the furthest I would consider under ideal conditions.

buck460XVR
September 23, 2012, 12:29 PM
Sorry, I should have specified bow and that I was concerned about entry/exit angles. I don't know how much farther than 20 yards I'd want to set up. 30 yards is about my maximum w/ 35 being the furthest I would consider under ideal conditions.

What I have found when placing tree stands is very seldom do I have the luxury of finding that perfect tree. Most of the time, terrain, size of tree and where the trail is relative to the best suitable tree is what dictates the angles of my shots. Smaller trees with low branches mean I need to be lower to get a clean shot and to be able to see. It gives me better angles but also leaves me venerable to be seen by the deer. Tall trees with out lower limbs give one better visibility over distance and give one more latitude for getting away with movement, but also give steeper shooting angles. One needs to know deer anatomy and where to place an arrow depending on those angles. Just shooting at the same spot that you shot at on your paper target isn't gonna do it. Murphy's law dictates that even if you do find that perfect tree that gives you the optimum shot for the trail you expect the deer to use, that big buck will use the trail behind and right under you.

janobles14
September 26, 2012, 12:06 AM
you should set up your scent bombs at least 35 yds or so away from your stand. deer try to circle downwind. if they are too close to you this can often put them within FEET of your stand as they close distance. you want the scent running at a crosswind from you (perpendicular so to speak) and upwind from there. this gives the deer plenty of room to ease in to investigate. shots should be around 20 yards under this setup (assuming that they act like they shoud! which of course we know they ALWAYS do! ;) )

Double Naught Spy
September 26, 2012, 01:30 AM
Deer don't have natural predators coming at them from above - so they don't need to check above them.

Yeah, they do, mountain lions and humans.

Captcurt
September 26, 2012, 08:51 AM
What I have found when placing tree stands is very seldom do I have the luxury of finding that perfect tree. Most of the time, terrain, size of tree and where the trail is relative to the best suitable tree is what dictates the angles of my shots. Smaller trees with low branches mean I need to be lower to get a clean shot and to be able to see. It gives me better angles but also leaves me venerable to be seen by the deer. Tall trees with out lower limbs give one better visibility over distance and give one more latitude for getting away with movement, but also give steeper shooting angles. One needs to know deer anatomy and where to place an arrow depending on those angles. Just shooting at the same spot that you shot at on your paper target isn't gonna do it. Murphy's law dictates that even if you do find that perfect tree that gives you the optimum shot for the trail you expect the deer to use, that big buck will use the trail behind and right under you.
This is a good reason to have several different types of stands. I love my climbers but sometimes the particular tree that I want dictates a ladder or a chain -on stand. You can't have too many.

dragon813gt
September 26, 2012, 08:59 AM
Deer don't have natural predators coming at them from above - so they don't need to check above them. As long as you're above where they're looking you're OK.


I beg to differ. I've been busted three times this year from them looking up into the trees. My stand is 16' up and 10' off the field. I'm surrounded on both sides so I'm protected in that way. But there is nothing directly in front of me. The deer routinely look up into the trees even when I'm not moving. I watched them do this all summer as well when I was just sitting and observing.

I'm assuming in different areas they don't look up. But when in an area where the vast majority hunt from stands. They definitely look up.



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desidog
September 26, 2012, 11:52 AM
^

well, I guess i should have put the caveat on there specifying "deer in my area." I'm in CT, where the deer have never seen a mountain lion; and more deer are killed by cars than by hunters. Since the deer still don't look both ways before running into traffic, i highly doubt they're looking for tree stands.

I've been busted three times this year from them looking up into the trees.

Maybe it's time to lighten up on the aftershave... :)

Captcurt
September 26, 2012, 12:17 PM
^

well, I guess i should have put the caveat on there specifying "deer in my area." I'm in CT, where the deer have never seen a mountain lion; and more deer are killed by cars than by hunters. Since the deer still don't look both ways before running into traffic, i highly doubt they're looking for tree stands.



Maybe it's time to lighten up on the aftershave... :)
I have permission to hunt a place that is leased by 3 bowhunters. I get to go in after they tag out. By the time I get to hunt it, the deer have been pounded hard for a good solid month. They are really jumpy. I have seen them come thru the woods as if they were on pins and needles, stopping every few steps and scanning the surrounding area both up and down and sideways. I have learned a lot about hunting deer when they are on full alert.

Rule#1: Watch your scent. You can fool their eyes and ears, but their nose is their number 1 defense.

Rule#2: Try to keep something behind you to break your outline.

Rule#3: Never move fast.

Rule#4: Never move when they are looking your way.

Keep these in mind and don't be surprised when they still catch you because some of them will.

dragon813gt
September 26, 2012, 03:08 PM
Maybe it's time to lighten up on the aftershave... :)

Haven't shaved in a few months ;)
I do go right after work but I do change clothes. It has more to do with where they're coming out of the corn field. There is only one tree I can put my stand on and it's in a direct line with where they come out. Nothing I can do about it :(




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beeb173
September 27, 2012, 10:45 AM
you should set up your scent bombs at least 35 yds or so away from your stand. deer try to circle downwind. if they are too close to you this can often put them within FEET of your stand as they close distance. you want the scent running at a crosswind from you (perpendicular so to speak) and upwind from there. this gives the deer plenty of room to ease in to investigate. shots should be around 20 yards under this setup (assuming that they act like they shoud! which of course we know they ALWAYS do! ;) )
that's the kind of answer i was looking for. 35 yards though...so you try to get them to come between you and your attractants? also have you had luck w/ buck bombs? my best luck was a mock scrape.

Lennyjoe
September 27, 2012, 11:22 AM
I've hunted in tree stands for years and have recently started to use ground blinds. More flexibility in location, movement is concealed and you can be more comfortable. Just need to be a bit more cognizant of scent in a ground blind. Bow hunters know this issue well.

27hand
October 1, 2012, 08:50 PM
I have found myself going higher and am now at 25' +. ( I move too much ). I have shot at deer almost under me and with the pendulum sight I used, hit dead on through 1 lung and have yet to not recover a deer.
Most shots however are in the neighborhood of 10 yds out to 25 ( my personal limit to ensure a good hit).

I don't use scent so cannot comment on that. I stopped archery for 5 yrs till this morn.( rotators bad).

This new Wicked Ridge Invader hits about a 3" group at 40 which effectively doubles the range i used to limit myself to. Got a 4X2 this morning with it at 25.

Win73
October 2, 2012, 02:27 AM
I have a 17 foot ladder stand set up such that the acorns from a large oak tree fall 20 to 30 yards from the stand. I hunt from it mainly with my crossbow during bow season. I have a range tree that is a measured 25 yards from my stand. If the deer is on the near side of the range tree, I use the top crosshair of the scope. If it is on the far side, I use the second crosshair.

Two seasons ago I killed a large doe with my crossbow. It was about 30 yards from the stand. There were eight does feeding on the acorns. I waited until the largest one turned broadside to me and put the second crosshair just behind her front shoulder. When I fired, all eight deer bolted. When I got down from the stand, I found the bolt 10 or 12 feet past where the deer had been standing. It was covered with blood and fat its entire length. It obviously had passed through the deer. I followed the blood trail and found her about a hundred yards from where I shot her.

Last season I thought I was going to get a shot at a seven point buck but its path only brought it within 60 yards of my stand. That was just too long a shot for a crossbow.

I have had deer walk by only three of four feet from the stand with me in it. Before I go hunting, I wash my clothes and me in scent free soap and spray scent eliminator on my boots.

303tom
October 2, 2012, 10:28 AM
Sorry, got no idea, never used one...............

bpl
October 2, 2012, 01:12 PM
I generallly go up 12-15' and try to setup for shots of 30yards and under. scents if used I'd try to put 20-30 yards away.

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