My real reloading setup, does not involve bathrooms, rental storages or ikea benches


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gfanikf
September 26, 2012, 03:06 PM
http://i.imgur.com/XqZr9.jpg
The bench isn't really stable though, I have no clue what's with it. It is portable and goes outside next to the grill when not in use.

This is where my gear goes when not using it (except powder and primers go on opposite ends of a walk in closet.
http://i.imgur.com/ODDWl.jpg

Now I only did one dummy reload (unprimed case and bullet) so I can get a feel for the setup. It's a bit cramped and I need to work on knowing the process first and not doing things on my legs (I'm going to lower the top of the bench), but I think it's a good start and will do fine with a cheap Lee non-hand press attached.

Anyone with ideas why the bench wobbles left and right though?

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Spammy_H
September 26, 2012, 04:08 PM
Not sure about the left-right wobble, but I'd reinforce the particleboard with plywood underneath.

I used a desk with a particle board & melamine top, but reinforced it with 3/4" plywood, glued and screwed to the underside of the desk, and then put in, front-to-back a 2x12 bolted in the back, with the press bolted through the desk, plywood, and 2x12 in the front. Probably overkill, but that's how I like it.

I'd reinforce it with plywood at least.

cfullgraf
September 26, 2012, 04:29 PM
Anyone with ideas why the bench wobbles left and right though?

I assume you mean the whole table wobbles? It is due to a combination of the floor not being level and/or the legs of the table not being all the same length.

Three legged things will never wobble but add a fourth leg (or more) and there is a good chance one leg will not touch the ground/floor.

It is easy to tell which is the leg that is not touching the floor, then either lengthen it a little if adjustment is available or put a shim under the short leg.

Floors of residential buildings are notorious for not being uniformly flat for many reasons. Best would be to set the table to be stable where it will be used. Then let it wobble where it is stored.

If only the top is wobbling, it is not properly fastened down and the top is allowed to move. Again, shimming can help but you also need to tighten down on the fasteners holding the top in place.

My presses are on free standing stands. They have adjustable feet built into them so that i can adjust out any wobble if I move the stand to a different location.

JohnM
September 26, 2012, 04:46 PM
Looks like it's sitting on a couple rugs. That don't help.
And that little thin could probably use a diagonal brace across the legs, maybe a couple.

gfanikf
September 26, 2012, 04:56 PM
I assume you mean the whole table wobbles? It is due to a combination of the floor not being level and/or the legs of the table not being all the same length.
.
Yeah it goes left to right and back and forward. It did it even on the concrete.

Not sure about the left-right wobble, but I'd reinforce the particleboard with plywood underneath.

I used a desk with a particle board & melamine top, but reinforced it with 3/4" plywood, glued and screwed to the underside of the desk, and then put in, front-to-back a 2x12 bolted in the back, with the press bolted through the desk, plywood, and 2x12 in the front. Probably overkill, but that's how I like it.

I'd reinforce it with plywood at least.
How would I do that? I'm sorry I can't really visual it, I never really built or did wood work.

Looks like it's sitting on a couple rugs. That don't help.
And that little thin could probably use a diagonal brace across the legs, maybe a couple.

That's true, but it did that on other surfaces. What type of diagonal brace would I get? I mean I think I'm visualizing what you are talking about, just not sure where I get it or how I would mount it since there are no open holes.

Sorry for the basic questions. I really wish I had learned how to build stuff with wood and other things like that. I mean my dad knows how to, but from living in apartments for the past 5 years, I never had a garage or area to build stuff in.

thump_rrr
September 26, 2012, 05:01 PM
Hey,

What's wrong with my Ikea setup?
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c40/Thump_rrr/DSCN0588.jpg

I would put a couple of 45lb. weightlifting plates under the table. that should give you a whole lot more stability.

Spammy_H
September 26, 2012, 05:08 PM
No problem. I remember when I couldn't change a light bulb if you couldn't get to it without removing anything.

What you could do is measure your bench top, go to Lowe's or Home Depot, and they'll cut a piece of plywood for you. I'd recommend 3/4" birch plywood. Spread some wood glue over your bench top, lay the plywood over it, and screw it from the underside with 1" or 1 1/4" wood screws. Use about 8 - 10 screws, evenly spaced.

Also have them cut a 2x8 or something like that the length of front-to-back on of your bench, buy two 4" bolts, four washers, and two lock nuts. Then drill 2 holes in the back of your bench, run the bolts through it, with washers on above and below the bench surfaces, and tighten the lock nuts.

Then mark the mounting holes for your press on the front edge of the table top (over hte 2x8), and drill through the double thickness top and 2 x 8, and mount your press there. Use washers and lock nuts on the underside. Your press manual will tell you the diameter bolts that you need. Drill your holes 1/8" bigger than the bolt sizes. That will take care of any flex in the surface, and keep the particle board from cracking or flaking.

The side-to-side is probably because of the floor, as stated above. Some weight on the bottom shelf, like a sandbag or concrete block might help. Or check for level on the bench top and the floor and see if you can put something under the leg(s) that are wobbling.

Grimshaw
September 26, 2012, 05:10 PM
gfan
If you got rid of the rug that would help with the wobble.And if you spill powder on the rug i don't think i would use a vacuum cleaner on the rug. Just my opinion.and use some plywood on the top.

gfanikf
September 26, 2012, 05:16 PM
Hey,

What's wrong with my Ikea setup?

I would put a couple of 45lb. weightlifting plates under the table. that should give you a whole lot more stability.

That is awesome, but look for my thread. This is the IKEA I was talking about this.
(http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40104270/)

No problem. I remember when I couldn't change a light bulb if you couldn't get to it without removing anything.
Yeah the I'm kind of surprised I actually did a full breakdown, because that's generally how I am.

What you could do is measure your bench top, go to Lowe's or Home Depot, and they'll cut a piece of plywood for you. I'd recommend 3/4" birch plywood. Spread some wood glue over your bench top, lay the plywood over it, and screw it from the underside with 1" or 1 1/4" wood screws. Use about 8 - 10 screws, evenly spaced.

Also have them cut a 2x8 or something like that the length of front-to-back on of your bench, buy two 4" bolts, four washers, and two lock nuts. Then drill 2 holes in the back of your bench, run the bolts through it, with washers on above and below the bench surfaces, and tighten the lock nuts.

Then mark the mounting holes for your press on the front edge of the table top (over hte 2x8), and drill through the double thickness top and 2 x 8, and mount your press there. Use washers and lock nuts on the underside. Your press manual will tell you the diameter bolts that you need. Drill your holes 1/8" bigger than the bolt sizes. That will take care of any flex in the surface, and keep the particle board from cracking or flaking.

The side-to-side is probably because of the floor, as stated above. Some weight on the bottom shelf, like a sandbag or concrete block might help. Or check for level on the bench top and the floor and see if you can put something under the leg(s) that are wobbling.

Thanks you so so so much! So basically for creating new holes a regular power drill should do the trick? I just don't want to try drilling a new hole in me..well some alloy and have a bad accident or splashback occur.

Lost Sheep
September 26, 2012, 05:44 PM
I expect the side-to-side wobble (if it is caused by the bolted-together joints flexing) can be completely cured by putting a solid back on the thing.

Cut a piece of particle board, masonite or plywood to exactly fit inside the angle iron legs between the bottom and intermediate shelf and press it into place. No holes required. But fitting must be precise.

You can do the same thing to fix the front-rear wobble/flex by doing the same thing on one or both sides of the table, but then you are cutting down on the amount of light that falls on your shelves.

You can also accomplish the same thing, with holes required, by putting diagonal braces, but it is a little easier to get some hooks, chain and turnbuckles. Putting your entire framework under tension this way will stiffen it.

The top, as has been mentioned before, being made of particle board may not stand up to the forces your press will apply to it. Eventually, flexing will overcome the adhesive the board is made of. Better to have solid wood, and not across the grain. Plywood works well. Personally, my presses have always been mounted on a 2x6 or 2x8, 16" to 30" long and either clamped, belted or wedged onto or into whatever I happen to be using as a work surface. The bolts are usually countersunk into the wood approximately 1/2" so the board can lay flat on whatever surface it is on. So the bolt head does not crush into the wood, I use a sizable washer.

Good luck. You are off to a good start.

Lost Sheep

cfullgraf
September 26, 2012, 07:07 PM
Yeah it goes left to right and back and forward. It did it even on the concrete.




If the bolted joints on the bench are flexing, as opposed to being rigid, that is a different issue and Lost Sheep has some good solutions to stiffen up the table.

Sorry that I did not understand the description of your problem at first.

Concrete floors are not necessarily "flat". I can move a four legged stand around on my shop floor and it will be stable in one place yet wobble in another.

oneounceload
September 26, 2012, 07:10 PM
Because the top isn't square on it - I have the same unit and when I tried to use the predrilled top holes, the legs were wobbly, when I got the unit stable, it works fine

Friar Whently
September 26, 2012, 07:12 PM
I figured I'd just chime in and say that I've reloaded close to 1,000 rounds with my Lee hand press and it works just fine for a single-stage. With no other setup can you sit back on the couch with the press in your lap.

My only beef is that a press with more leverage would be nice, but I've only ever thought that while decapping/resizing 9mm brass...that can take a bit of effort.

splattergun
September 26, 2012, 08:11 PM
[QUOTE=gfanikf;8424279

Anyone with ideas why the bench wobbles left and right though?[/QUOTE]

It's probably not square. I had a similar problem with an old printer stand that looks much like your stand. I got it from the recycle bin at work. What I did was loosened the bolts slightly, just enough that when I placed it on a solid concrete floor I could make all 4 feet square on the floor, then tightend the bolts. I used a left-over piece of hardwood butcher block countertop from Ikea as the top. Solid, sturdy, and light enough to move around the house. You might also find that a stronger top will help stabilize it, also.

Your rig should work real well for that hand press you have stored underneath. It's not necessary to reinforce the top while using that gear, unless you want the additional stability. But if you get a bench press, you will definately need something stronger.

Mine is a bit too short for my liking, so I need to find a piece of steel plate to weld up an elevated press mount.

Welcome to the insanity.

What? You're still here? Get over to that bench and get to loading!! :neener:

If you enjoyed reading about "My real reloading setup, does not involve bathrooms, rental storages or ikea benches" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!