Paperback Reloading books...??????


PDA






Keeperfaith
September 27, 2012, 12:19 PM
Hey all

I've seen these books online, they're paperback w/ plastic spirals.

I'm wondering if they are worth the $10 they charge for them?

Does/has anyone used them and thought them to be a valueable peice of reloading data?

They come in only one caliber (per book) and tout they are the "complete reloading manual for XX caliber" and "a must have" for any reloading library.

I'm just wondering if they are worth the ten bucks. I don't wanna buy one and find old xerox copies of data from the 70's (not that thats bad, but I want up to date info to keep up w/ up to date powder/primers).

Thanks and LMK please

Steve

If you enjoyed reading about "Paperback Reloading books...??????" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Shmackey
September 27, 2012, 12:22 PM
They are indeed photocopies. But their age depends on when they were made. See if you can find a year.

I have a couple but never felt compelled to get one for every caliber.

joecil
September 27, 2012, 12:24 PM
I have one for every caliber I own (9mm, 45 acp, 45 Colt & 45-70) and feel they are another tool in the box really. They tend to be a bit older but I cross reference them with newer books as well as cover some bullets not covered by other books. I also have written notes in mind as they are easy to grab and turn to the page needed.

KansasSasquatch
September 27, 2012, 12:44 PM
I think they are worth the $7 I pay at Cabelas. They have some bullets and powders listed that my Lyman and Lee books don't. All the info in them comes from the bullet and powder manufacturers instead if independent testing like Lee and Lyman which go by manufacturer suggestions. They do leave out some info on some loads though, especially when it comes to pressures. I don't go over Max loads anyways but I like to know what pressures they are creating. Vihta Vouri for example doesn't publish pressures. The way VV publishes data it's like they want you to believe that even .1gr above their max is going to result in a guaranteed kaboom.

HOWARD J
September 27, 2012, 01:54 PM
I purchased them for every caliber---the data is old in the books I have.
I have almost every reloading book so I don't use them anymore.

DanTheFarmer
September 27, 2012, 02:32 PM
Keeper,

I've found them useful. They are only load data so they don't substitute for a good "how to" manual. I often use them to cross check loads. If I read or hear about someone's favorite load I can easily check here for safety. If the pet load is above everything in the book I won't consider it further.

They can add to the confusion however as you get to see just how variable data is. Sometimes a bullet maker and a powder maker will have quite different data for an identical set up. Most of the time there is a consensus though. Most often the same set up will yeild the same max load within a couple of tenths.

Good Luck.

Dan

dickttx
September 28, 2012, 12:23 PM
I would certainly try to look at the contents before buying.
I bought one for the 38 Super and did not find anything usable in it.

ny32182
September 28, 2012, 12:30 PM
These are the only manuals I buy, and I find the data packaged by caliber in this format far more useful than in the standard manufacturers books that only list their specific stuff.

cfullgraf
September 28, 2012, 12:40 PM
I purchased them for every caliber---the data is old in the books I have.
I have almost every reloading book so I don't use them anymore.

I have purchased a few but was disappointed that the data was older than the current manuals that I had at the time. I do not bother with the Load Books any more.

If I need data from particular manufacturer for a particular bullet, I do not mind getting their manual. Sure as shootin', there will come a time that I will need data for another of their bullets. Then the cost of the Load Books adds up quick and I have spent more than the manufacturer's manual in the first place.

rcmodel
September 28, 2012, 12:45 PM
All the load books are just copied old power manufactures data available elsewhere.

If that is all you want, I would suggest just buying the Lee "Modern Reloading 2nd Edition, Revised" book for $18 bucks and get old copied data for every caliber there is.

Otherwise, I would suggest a Lyman #49 for $20 bucks that covers most calibers anyone would reload, and also give both jacketed and lead bullet data for all of them.
It is modern, up to date, lab tested data.

rc

Reloadron
September 28, 2012, 01:15 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Do what rc says. :)

I have a few of those caliber books that were given to me over the years. However, as rc mentions there is a better way. For about a $38 investment you cover all the bases, even a few bases you never knew existed.

Ron

gspn
September 28, 2012, 11:12 PM
I have one for some calibers. They are most helpful for things like .41 mag which are hard to find data for. My "normal" reloading guide is the Lyman 49th edition. That manual lists data for 4 bullets in the following weights in 41 mag: 170, 200, 210, and 220...that's it.

If all you use is that manual then you limit the scope of available bullets. For instance I have a box of 215 grain keith style bullets right now...with the Lyman book I'd have no data for them.

The paper back Load Books you are looking at offer me 41 mag data on weights from 170 all the way up to 290. That is a vital book on my reloading shelf.

If you are doing common calibers like the 44 mag you don't need it as much...most manuals will have tons of data on the more popular stuff.

jjjitters
September 29, 2012, 01:23 AM
I have several of them and use them enough for the cost. They are a quick reference book for multiple sources.Older yes,the loads were good then, why not now??? Some powders have changed a bit,but not that many and normal reloading practices of work up will show that.One or 2 newer Manuals are a good reference also to help weed those out.

FROGO207
September 29, 2012, 08:09 AM
I have lots of old/new manuals dating from the 40's to the present. I see no need to get the single caliber books with what I have and the interweb at my disposal. If you want all your oldish info in a single spot get them and help a specific firearms related company continue to prosper. that is a good thing IMHO.:)

Hondo 60
September 29, 2012, 10:07 PM
I have 'em for every caliber I reload 'cept one.
(which they don't make)

They're just reprinted material from about a dozen sources.
So you "should" be able to find a load that suits you.

LOTS cheaper than buying each source's book.

Lerk
October 2, 2012, 02:07 AM
I have one in all of my calibers as well. I especially like the 12ga shotshell one. Lots of older or unique load data in there that isn't in Lyman's shotshell book. And at about $7 a pop at Scheels I can't complain too much about them.

helotaxi
October 2, 2012, 09:44 PM
I have several of them and use them enough for the cost. They are a quick reference book for multiple sources.Older yes,the loads were good then, why not now??? Some powders have changed a bit,but not that many and normal reloading practices of work up will show that.One or 2 newer Manuals are a good reference also to help weed those out.Newer testing methodology has shown that in many cases, the loads weren't really good then.

Gtimothy
October 2, 2012, 11:32 PM
I have a few of them and use them to keep notes in. They are "dated" but the nice thing is, they are caliber specific and if you find updated info, you can write it in where it needs to go. That's what I use them for anyway...

Jasper1573
October 2, 2012, 11:59 PM
Yes, they are worth the $$...I bought a couple a few months ago for 243 Win and 308 Win. I find them useful because they complement my Lyman and Speer manuals with some data that neither have. Also, I checked them against latest internet data and they are up to date. I know the internet data is free, but I like having hard copy rather than virtual copy...easier to work with hard copy at the reloading bench.

Asherdan
October 4, 2012, 12:49 PM
I contacted them in 2009 via email and asked them for the last refresh of their load data. At the time it was 2004 for 45/70 and 44 Rem Mag. I'd say ask 'em again before you buy. If it's still 2004 data I'd get the Lyman 49th instead, it's a refresh of the 2004 data from the Lyman 48th.

rfwobbly
October 4, 2012, 01:53 PM
• It's only load data. No cartridge measurements or reloading insights.
• It's mostly free data you could print out yourself from the powder maker's web page
• You'll be MUCH better off buying the Lyman #49 reloading manual in paperback for ~$21

If you enjoyed reading about "Paperback Reloading books...??????" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!