Lead bullets, which to use


PDA






Jhamblen86
September 27, 2012, 06:25 PM
I have just gotten into reloading 44 magnum. Once I realized I should be using lead bullets instead of jacketed, even though I don't have too. I'm not sure who to go with. I did order some Oregon trail 240gr swc. Any thoughts and feed back on this company or others would be a big help

If you enjoyed reading about "Lead bullets, which to use" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
SlowFuse
September 27, 2012, 07:26 PM
For larger calibers I have been using beartooth bullets with success (on paper). For everything smaller than 40 I have been using Missouri Bullet Co.

No reason for the seperate companies. My logic is that beartooth makes a quality bullet, and in the larger calibers I'm willing to pay a little extra. No qualms however with Missouri. Great product also.

Another that has been suggested to me from a friend is Rim Rock. I haven't tried them, but have heard good things.

Any reason for wanting to load lead? Is cost the main factor?

blarby
September 27, 2012, 08:28 PM
Every bullet casting company has their share of fanatics, and detractors.

When I was buying them, I used Mo bullet. They ship fast, the product is good, and they offered ( not sure if they still do, or not) a THR discount.

I also trade them (cast bullets) , see below...

Hardest thing, for me, about buying from a big casting outfit is you might end up with 500 ish bullets you dont like- for whatever reason. For that reason alone, if I were you, i'd do my research ( just like you are doing now- thats some quality stuff you got betwixt those ears ! ) before buying ! FWIW- if you end up with Mo bullets you don't like- most of the folks here will trade them away from ya pretty fast... there is a hard-core following of MO BULLET fans here- and I was among them when I bought cast bullets.

If you are going to be shooting for any length of time- you might want to make the very modest investment to start casting... it pays for itself pretty quickly.

Jhamblen86
September 27, 2012, 09:40 PM
The main purpose I want to reload lead is $$$. The more cash I save the more I get to shoot. Actually I'm shooting twice as much and spending the same. But the wife sees it as half cost because of the price per shot. Also, I heard lead bullets put less wear on your barrel.

I have done some research on Mo bullets but all I found was the common semi-auto calibers. Nothing for a wheel gun. Unless I'm mistaken and over looked them.

blarby
September 27, 2012, 09:42 PM
http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=5&secondary=12

FROGO207
September 27, 2012, 09:44 PM
Yep for good lead bullets and great prices Missouri Bullet delivers all around IMHO. I have used Beartooth, Hunters Supply, Laser Cast, and Zcast. All work well and all are reasonably priced IMHO. I go to MO bullet for the fast service for the most part but you may have to get them through another distributor if they are busy.

gspn
September 27, 2012, 10:09 PM
I buy all my lead from Missouri Bullet Co. I shoot lead mainly in .41 and .44 mag and I've been through a few thousand of their bullets with no problems. Great company, great service.

ljnowell
September 27, 2012, 10:15 PM
Another vote for Missouri Bullet. I wont buy lead anywhere else.

Jhamblen86
September 27, 2012, 10:58 PM
Ok, I think y'all have convinced me lol. With that said, at how many fps do you start to see them leading the barrel?

ljnowell
September 27, 2012, 11:02 PM
Ok, I think y'all have convinced me lol. With that said, at how many fps do you start to see them leading the barrel?

Too many variables. Depends on the exact gun being used, powder type, bullet fit, etc.

I see you are just down the road from me. I live in Litchfield, I know a few people there in GC.

Jhamblen86
September 27, 2012, 11:17 PM
Too many variables. Depends on the exact gun being used, powder type, bullet fit, etc.

I see you are just down the road from me. I live in Litchfield, I know a few people there in GC.
You wouldn't happen to know any of the Hamblens from jerseyville?

Hootus
September 27, 2012, 11:25 PM
I've had great success and service from Penn Bullets and they make great lead bullets in most calibers. I've loaded 500 of their .44 mag bullets and they work just fine.

ljnowell
September 27, 2012, 11:47 PM
You wouldn't happen to know any of the Hamblens from jerseyville?

I sure dont. The only people I know from that area are the mathenia's in Carollton.

KansasSasquatch
September 28, 2012, 12:00 AM
I've only used Missouri Bullets in .45 and .38 when it comes to lead but I have had nothing but good using them. I don't think you can find anything cheaper unless you cast your own. MO Bullets are made pretty much right there where the lead is mined out of the ground, no shipping that heavy stuff around to be processed.

Jhamblen86
September 28, 2012, 12:28 AM
Would it be wise to test a couple different suppliers or pick a brand and stick with them?

blarby
September 28, 2012, 12:44 AM
Ok, I think y'all have convinced me lol. With that said, at how many fps do you start to see them leading the barrel?

It can start at about as low as 300, and go from there.

Leading in bores has a multitude of nefarious origins :

Incorrect slug size.

Too hot of a powder charge.

Incorrect hardness for application.

Forcing cone irregularities.

Improper bullet seating techniques.

Pre-existing bore obstructions.

Pre-existing bore irregularities.

Improper bullet lubrication amount.

Improper bullet lubrication type.

Nearly limitless Combinations of all of the above.

In the application it would appear you intend to use them( targets), a bullet of anywhere between 16 and 18 BHN , driven under 1400 fps, given proper bullet fitment to both bore and forcing cone, should produce minimal to no leading.

In my .44 magnum, a 240g tumble lube bullet of 16-18 BHN on top of 10 grs of unique is excitingly accurate, and produces little to no leading.

That same bullet on top of 23 grs of h-110 produces noticeable leading for the first 1 inch or so of the bore. With that said, I can shoot 4-5 cylinders of this load in succession, at ranges of 15-30 feet, before any appreciable loss in accuracy occurs. At that point, its probably my hand- not the leading.

In any event, 2 or 3 jacketed or gas-checked rounds after each lead firing session removes the lead from my bore, and that of many others that I have tried, completely.

Why I am awake at this time to answer this question however, is another matter entirely.

noylj
September 28, 2012, 01:13 AM
lead bullet:
What is the diameter of the throats in your cylinder? The bullets should be a Tight slip fit. Some guns don't mind bullets slightly larger than the throat diameter and larger is better than smaller. Last thing you want is a gap where hot gasses will go shooting past the bullet and erode it.
Then, most guns want a lead bullet that is at least 0.001" over the barrel groove diameter (you need to slug your barrel and determine what the groove diameter is).
Many people buy lead bullets that are too hard for the pressure and velocities they are using and don't understand why they get leading.
In my .44s, I have cast my bullets from what is close to Lyman #2 (90% lead and 5% each tin and antimony). I aim for a BHN of 12-15.
As far as ordering bullets, many companies will send you evaluation packs.
I like mastercastbullets.com and Missouri Bullets, but I get "personal" service from master cast.
Find out the important dimensions of your gun, discuss it with the company, describe what you are loading for (target, general fun, hunting) as each type of activity will limit the bullet choices. If you are just having fun, you don't need to spend the money on heavy, large flat meplat, bullets like Leadhead Bullets. If you want to shoot targets and like to shoot a lot, you will be best served with a lighter (200-240gn) bullet, probably of SWC style and possibly a softer bullet for lighter target loads. A good choice here is to look for "Cowboy" bullets as they are made for light loads and quick shooting.
If you want to load max, you may have to buy bullets with gas checks (I never had, but I never tried to "push the envelope" either).
Mastercastbullets.com offers a 20BHN 0.430" 240gn L-SWC for $92.57/1000.
Missouri Bullets offers an 18BHN .430" 240gn L-SWC for $93/1000.
Penn Bullets offers a 0.431" 240gn L-SWC for $105/1000 and will size them to 0.429, 0.430, or 0.432" if requested.
There is nothing wrong with jacketed bullets, other than the cost.
Montana Gold offers a 240gn JSP of $333/1950 or $171/1000--a stiff increase in price, but the bullet is GREAT and is a "no-brainer"--no leading and pleasure to load and shoot, but it costs...

Jhamblen86
September 28, 2012, 02:26 AM
lead bullet:
What is the diameter of the throats in your cylinder? The bullets should be a Tight slip fit. Some guns don't mind bullets slightly larger than the throat diameter and larger is better than smaller. Last thing you want is a gap where hot gasses will go shooting past the bullet and erode it.
Then, most guns want a lead bullet that is at least 0.001" over the barrel groove diameter (you need to slug your barrel and determine what the groove diameter is).
Many people buy lead bullets that are too hard for the pressure and velocities they are using and don't understand why they get leading.
In my .44s, I have cast my bullets from what is close to Lyman #2 (90% lead and 5% each tin and antimony). I aim for a BHN of 12-15.
As far as ordering bullets, many companies will send you evaluation packs.
I like mastercastbullets.com and Missouri Bullets, but I get "personal" service from master cast.
Find out the important dimensions of your gun, discuss it with the company, describe what you are loading for (target, general fun, hunting) as each type of activity will limit the bullet choices. If you are just having fun, you don't need to spend the money on heavy, large flat meplat, bullets like Leadhead Bullets. If you want to shoot targets and like to shoot a lot, you will be best served with a lighter (200-240gn) bullet, probably of SWC style and possibly a softer bullet for lighter target loads. A good choice here is to look for "Cowboy" bullets as they are made for light loads and quick shooting.
If you want to load max, you may have to buy bullets with gas checks (I never had, but I never tried to "push the envelope" either).
Mastercastbullets.com offers a 20BHN 0.430" 240gn L-SWC for $92.57/1000.
Missouri Bullets offers an 18BHN .430" 240gn L-SWC for $93/1000.
Penn Bullets offers a 0.431" 240gn L-SWC for $105/1000 and will size them to 0.429, 0.430, or 0.432" if requested.
There is nothing wrong with jacketed bullets, other than the cost.
Montana Gold offers a 240gn JSP of $333/1950 or $171/1000--a stiff increase in price, but the bullet is GREAT and is a "no-brainer"--no leading and pleasure to load and shoot, but it costs...
Thank you, I will check my bore diameter. Never thought to do that.

Jhamblen86
September 28, 2012, 09:22 AM
Is it true lead bullets wear on your bore less than jacketed bullets? I had heard this and it's one of the reasons I'm going to lead bullets.

Kyle M.
September 28, 2012, 09:32 AM
I use cb bullets 240 lswc they are $101.50 per 1000 shipped.

www.cbbullets.com

homatok
September 28, 2012, 02:09 PM
Quote from above "In the application it would appear you intend to use them( targets), a bullet of anywhere between 16 and 18 BHN , driven under 1400 fps, given proper bullet fitment to both bore and forcing cone, should produce minimal to no leading."----

If the bullet to firearm "fit" is correct! With cast, "fit is king". You need to slug your barrel (auto) or slug your barrel (both ends) and slug the throats (revolver). If the throats on a revolver are smaller than the maximum bore diameter, you WILL get leading! The reason for slugging both ends of a revolver barrel is due to the possibility of a constriction where the barrel screws into the frame.

jerryd
September 28, 2012, 02:12 PM
Check out Magnus bullets, i use them in my 45, 10mm, and just tried their 255gr semi wad cutter in 44cal.

ljnowell
September 28, 2012, 04:44 PM
Would it be wise to test a couple different suppliers or pick a brand and stick with them?

My advice would be to try the Missouri Bullets and see what result you get. I played around with a lot of different ones and settled on those. Plus, being a fellow Illinoisan you have a benefit, shipping is lightening fast from Missouri Bullet to us. Missouri Bullet ships fast to everyone, no doubt, but here in Illinois its like next day service most of the time. I actually ordered on a monday morning and got them tuesday afternoon once. Amazing.

gspn
September 28, 2012, 06:17 PM
Here is an article on lead hardness from the MO bullet website...it does a good job explaining it. I push my 41's and 44's from light loads to full magnum velocities and I've never had a problem with leading.

http://www.missouribullet.com/technical.php

Hondo 60
September 28, 2012, 06:55 PM
Nudder vote for Missouri Bullet Co.
Great folks, very fast shipping, large assortment of bullets & personal attention.
And they still have a discount for thr members - just search this site for the coupon code.

I've asked for & rec'd a small sample (when I placed another order).
So you might try to get just a few to see if they like your gun.

Here's a link to their 44 Special/Magnum page.
Just be sure to select a bullet with a BHN of 18 for magnum velocities.

http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=5&secondary=12

Jhamblen86
September 28, 2012, 09:49 PM
Thanks guys I really appreciate the advice.

codefour
September 29, 2012, 11:07 AM
Is it true lead bullets wear on your bore less than jacketed bullets? I had heard this and it's one of the reasons I'm going to lead bullets.

This is the exact reason I shoot mainly lead in my revolvers. The bores do last longer shooting cast lead. The lands and grooves will last much longer. Isn't the BHN of copper 35? Shooting a boolit that is half the hardness will save barrel life.

CraigC
September 29, 2012, 02:21 PM
I've used at least a dozen different brands of commercial cast bullets and for such generic choices as a 240gr SWC, I have seen no practical difference between them. Oregon Trail makes a good bullet. Not as cheap as they used to be but then, nothing is. Shoot them with impunity. Don't worry about things like throat/bore dimensions unless you have a reason to. I have seven .44Mag's and half a dozen other .44's and have never had an issue with dimensions. Some folks like to unnecessarily complicate everything and worry about problems they don't even know they have. :rolleyes:

blarby
September 29, 2012, 11:02 PM
Some folks like to unnecessarily complicate everything and worry about problems they don't even know they have.

A-MEN

kelbro
September 29, 2012, 11:17 PM
I have never purchased lead bullets (I cast my own) but based on the feedback here, I would try Missouri. I have considered purchasing lead for a couple of calibers (25-20, 380 ACP) that I don't shoot enough to justify buying molds, sizers, gas checks, etc... for but I usually just buy a couple of boxes of Hornadys and call it good.

Jhamblen86
September 29, 2012, 11:31 PM
Well I just loaded 100 Oregon trail bullets that I was able to find at cabelas. If I like the results I get then I might stick with them. If I don't like my results then I will definutly go with another brand. I'm not shooting silhouette or looking for extreme accuracy. If I can shoot an empty soda can at 25 yards I will be happy.

ljnowell
September 30, 2012, 02:49 AM
Well I just loaded 100 Oregon trail bullets that I was able to find at cabelas. If I like the results I get then I might stick with them. If I don't like my results then I will definutly go with another brand. I'm not shooting silhouette or looking for extreme accuracy. If I can shoot an empty soda can at 25 yards I will be happy

How much were they?

Jhamblen86
September 30, 2012, 09:18 AM
$70 for 500

KansasSasquatch
September 30, 2012, 10:45 AM
For $70 you can almost get Rainier plated bullets at Cabelas. If you are buying cast bullets you should be paying $20-30 less, generally speaking. For $75-80 I can walk into Cabelas and walk out with 500 Rainier or Berry's plated bullets and not have to worry about leading and be able to use them at indoor ranges.

jjjitters
September 30, 2012, 11:14 AM
If you cast them yourself ,it would only cost about $20, depending how much you have to pay for lead.;) With my sources I'd be in the $10-$12 neighborhood. It pays for the molds pretty quick.
To buy them, Powder Valley would be my 1st choice.

ljnowell
September 30, 2012, 01:55 PM
$70 for 500

Still gotta recommend missouri bullet.

Shimitup
September 30, 2012, 05:17 PM
I'm just starting to load lead for my Redhawk after thirty years of flinging jacketed stuff down range. I'm very happy with Missouri Bullets, I've been shooting their Bullseye #1 out of my 1911 and very happy with the result. I figured it was time to save money in one of my other favorite calibers so I'm trying the .44 240 Keith SWC this coming week.

336A
September 30, 2012, 06:33 PM
I really like the bullets from Montana Bullet works http://www.montanabulletworks.com/home.html

Yes they are more expensive than your run of the mill commercial cast bullets. However these bullets exude quality and are cast by hand from a ladle. You will not find any of the bullets missing lube and they can be had in different BHN. Mr. Jennings offers a lot of different cast bullet designs and weights. I was hesitant to buy some at first due to the price but I'm glad I did now.

kelbro
September 30, 2012, 07:51 PM
Yes, lead isn't as cheap now as it once was and will probably not do anything but go up. The enviro-whackos will see to that under the guise of 'it's for our own good'.

Jhamblen86
September 30, 2012, 08:14 PM
How safe is it to cast your own?

kelbro
September 30, 2012, 08:25 PM
Been casting for 37 yrs without incident. Lead levels checked every two years. Never an issue. Use a little common sense and you'll be fine. Spend an afternoon browsing castboolits.com. Great resource that I wish I would have had when I was starting out. Lots of good folks over there (and here) that will help you out.

When I started and up until a couple of years ago, I could get all the wheelweights a person would want and didn't bother hoarding them. Now (if you can find them) you have to pay for them.

blarby
October 1, 2012, 12:43 AM
Those montana bullets look pretty.

They are however, more expensive than just about every jacketed bullet i've ever used- except some very select rifle bullets, and some very select SD handgun HP's.

Very pretty though. He also has a lot of sizes that most people dont see commonly from a commercial caster.

I suppose if you had a handgun, or rifle, that ate lead better than jacketed- he would be who I would go see if you needed the best.

That is certainly not plinkin fare.

CraigC
October 2, 2012, 10:10 AM
That is certainly not plinkin fare.
Exactly! Premium cast bullets from companies like Montana Bullet Works, Cast Performance and Beartooth are great for hunting but way too expensive for plinking and practice.

Although Leadhead's has a really nice 250gr Keith bullet for about what generic 240gr bevel-based SWC's cost.

https://secure25.securewebsession.com/proshootpro.com/order.htm

Jim Watson
October 2, 2012, 10:15 AM
Although I have cast bullets in the past, I am now loading .40-65 and occasionally .38-55 BPCRs with Montana Bullet Works custom cast and sized bullets. They are expensive but currently I'd rather pay than set back up for casting.

My pistols get either cast or plated for economy. I like moly coated lead but they are not available in all the shapes and weights I want.

ApplePie
October 2, 2012, 08:44 PM
I bought and loaded 1000 Oregon Trail 44 Cal. 240g SWC many years ago and they looked and shot great out of my S&W 629.

Jhamblen86
October 2, 2012, 10:42 PM
I bought and loaded 1000 Oregon Trail 44 Cal. 240g SWC many years ago and they looked and shot great out of my S&W 629.
Is there a reason you stopped loading them?

ApplePie
October 5, 2012, 11:26 PM
The reason I stopped loading them is because I stopped shooting the 44 mag because I got divorced and had to sell my house and land, which had my own shooting range on it. Then... I decided I wanted another wife and spent a bunch of time finding one...

Aren't you glad you asked? :)

Has nothing to do with the bullets. I still think they are great. I'm about to get back into it now that I moved somewhere with a range close by.

41 Mag
October 6, 2012, 08:07 AM
In my revolvers the Oregon Trial bullets have all shot well. I picked up a bunch of them years ago for a very decent price. That said I found loads that shot good, and for the most part let them sit. I have shot more of them through my 45 ACP than anything which for the most part was why I got them in the first place.

In my 357, 41,44's I have loaded them to top end velocity with no leading noted in any of them. However I have found they were a bit hard for my hunting needs or wants. Yes they penetrated like no bodies business, but I wanted a bit of expansion as well. There were a couple I recovered which showed nothing much more than the rifling marks along the sides.

Early last year I jumped into casting my own to feed the appetite of my 454. I really wasn't going to get into it full bore, but the bug bit and now I cast something for about all of my handguns and have molds for a couple of rifles.

I have found that my own cast produce even better accuracy, more probably due to the softer alloys being used, or possibly a combination of other factors. That said, you could get into casting pretty cheaply if your only pouring up one type bullet for one caliber. Like has been mentioned the lead will be the hardest thing to source a good supply of. However there are plenty of folks selling it here and there for around $1 a pound delivered to your door. If your buying it then be on the look out for zinc, as some out there simply melt up a bunch of WW and do not separate it out. Look for feedback or plenty of good replies on the quality, and your usually good to go.

As for the other tools, a Lee 4/20 will pour plenty of fine bullets with one full pot, and they aren't overly expensive. An old steel pot or cast iron kettle that can be had at a lot of yard sales or second hand stores would work to smelt down and flux your raw lead into usable ingots. A lead dipper can be many of the cheaper SS ladels which are sold at dollar stores or for a bit more you can purchase a name brand. A good thermometer would run you around $35 and alloy you to keep your temps below 700 while smelting and keep your pouring pot closer to a desired temp to keep your alloy more consistent.

Even if you didn't want to go with some of the higher priced items like the Lee pot, simply poruing from the dipper would produce plenty of quality bullets. Then as for sizing, the simply Lee push through sizers work very well, as does the Alox in either the straight form or one of the blended forms which recipes can be found around on the net.

For starting out you can't beat the Lee molds, however they do have a few issues. Nothing that a bit of attention and care during use won't get you through. For production it's hard to beat their 6 cavity molds, but for just starting out they can be a bit intimidating and frustrating as well. Most of which is due to the mold temp not being up to where it needs to be.

If you know what bullet you want to shoot, you can either go with one of the other name brand mold makes, or choose one of the customs. With the customs you usually get between 2 and 4 cavities, but the quality of the molds will usually offset the price pretty quickly. These can be in iron, aluminum, or brass, and if they allow, you can tell them what alloy your using and they will set up the mold to deliver the proper weight and diameter with that alloy. Some do some don't, and most simply use Lyman #2 as a standard with WW alloy second. If your using something different your diameters and weights might be a bit off the design dimensions but the sizers will straighten up the diameter part quick and easy, and you simply adjust your load for the weight.

I personally don't do a lot of plinking. I hunt hogs with my revolvers on a regular year round basis, as such I work up my hunting loads and practice with them. They are for the most part nowhere in the same park as what most refer to as a plinking load. I do this so I don't have to worry about resetting the sights once they are zeroed at 50yds for my hunting loads. I simply pick up which ever revolver I want to use that particular weekend and head to the woods. I throw in a box of rounds and if I am not seeing any hogs then I will shoot some at a few preset targets just to keep in practice. On the hogs I will not hesitate to shoot them at ranges out to and exceeding 100yds. I have several with my 41 past 100yds and a couple with my 454 out to 87yds all one shot drops. I also have plenty of misses which I can easily attribute to my part of the equation as I get pretty excited once they break cover and don't always take the time to settle my sights. Usually it is from yanking the trigger and pulling the shot high verses being calm and gently squeezing it. Call it hog fever if you will, thats my story and I'm sticking to it. :D

One little tidbit, don't let anyone tell you that revolver loads leaving the muzzle at velocities above 1300fps won't hit hard and shoot pretty darned flat. I have shot over more things holding high than I care to admit to even when perfectly calm and rested on a good rest. I have rolled 200# hogs with both jacketed and cast bullets out past 100yds when I put the bullet where it needed to be and gotten complete pass throughs with both. A good bullet with sectional density will do things you just don't think it would do further than you think it should, the key however is the practice it takes to be able to use that extra range. I have been shooting this far for years and am still learning from it.

JLDickmon
October 6, 2012, 08:51 AM
I've used at least a dozen different brands of commercial cast bullets and for such generic choices as a 240gr SWC, I have seen no practical difference between them. Oregon Trail makes a good bullet. Not as cheap as they used to be but then, nothing is. Shoot them with impunity. Don't worry about things like throat/bore dimensions unless you have a reason to. I have seven .44Mag's and half a dozen other .44's and have never had an issue with dimensions. Some folks like to unnecessarily complicate everything and worry about problems they don't even know they have. :rolleyes:

bought a bag of shot lately?

edfardos
October 6, 2012, 11:10 AM
tried missouri bullets, too soft or too narrow for a super redhawk at max loads.. Leading.

for max loads oregontrail lasercast, harder, wider (can barely push them thru the cyl). No leading.

tried xtreme plated too, they also lead because they leave their jackets in the forcing cone.

but that's just me, I only shoot max loads in 44mag.

tly999
October 6, 2012, 11:32 AM
Ok, I think y'all have convinced me lol. With that said, at how many fps do you start to see them leading the barrel?
I am not an expert in any way, but the following link is to a downloadable PDF book that I have used to answer some of my "why is my pistol leading" questions. Great reference material and it is free.

Terry

http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_Contents.htm

Certaindeaf
October 6, 2012, 11:58 AM
$70 for a box of 500 240's? That seems about fair. How much is a box of 50 .44 ammo down at the walmarts?
There ain't even a Cabella's around these parts. never even been in one

Jhamblen86
October 7, 2012, 12:25 AM
$70 for a box of 500 240's? That seems about fair. How much is a box of 50 .44 ammo down at the walmarts?
There ain't even a Cabella's around these parts. never even been in one
Your standard box of rounds at Walmart (if you can find them) is about 35-40, I think. It's been a long time since I found and purchased any at Walmart.

Certaindeaf
October 7, 2012, 12:36 AM
I figured about as much.. haven't bought any for a long time.

If you enjoyed reading about "Lead bullets, which to use" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!