1st set of Lee dies


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thomis
September 28, 2012, 08:14 AM
I own all the other brands of dies. I just ordered my first set of Lee dies for the .40 S&W. The price was just too good to pass up. A new, full set of dies including a carbide sizer, shell holder, powder dipper, etc. for $34 shipped. I thought it was a good deal.
Anything I should know about these Lee dies? I wouldn't think so, but I know some folks say they are not as good as the others.

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cfullgraf
September 28, 2012, 08:20 AM
The dies themselves are good.

I dislike the lock rings as they do not have a locking feature to maintain your setting. Regardless of the propaganda from Lee, the o-ring is just not positive enough to hold the setting when installing or removing the die from the press.

Some folks like that feature or not a problem if you mount the die a a bushing (Lee's breech lock or Hornady L-N-L) or some kind of tool head.

Enjoy your new dies.

KansasSasquatch
September 28, 2012, 08:25 AM
Definitely do yourself a favor and get some Hornady lock rings to with the dies. RCBS lock rings work but they can damage the threads if you over tighten them.

thomis
September 28, 2012, 08:47 AM
This is exactly the kind of info I was after.
Thanks!

p.s. i just got the Hornady lock rings on ebay for $7 incl. s&h, not bad

Friar Whently
September 28, 2012, 08:48 AM
I agree with the Hornady lock rings. I have one for each of my 8 Lee dies.

stubbicatt
September 28, 2012, 09:45 AM
Yep. +1 on Hornady lock rings. They are the best. If only I could develop a tool like a long socket to extend down over the dies and engage the Hornady lock rings to snug them down into the press.

jcwit
September 28, 2012, 10:19 AM
Yep. +1 on Hornady lock rings. They are the best. If only I could develop a tool like a long socket to extend down over the dies and engage the Hornady lock rings to snug them down into the press.


Once the lock ring is locked in place there's no reason to tighten the die/lock ring down that much. Finger tight is more than good enough.

JohnM
September 28, 2012, 10:33 AM
A number of people seem to have trouble with Lee's O-ring locking system.
I've got several sets of Lee dies and never had a problem with settings changing.
Takes a little different method of screwing them into the press than those locked up with steel rings, no big deal.

cfullgraf
September 28, 2012, 11:29 AM
Once the lock ring is locked in place there's no reason to tighten the die/lock ring down that much. Finger tight is more than good enough.

I basically agree and for sure, a deep socket, and the associated lever arm (aka wrench handle), is not necessary. Sometimes, when my hands hurt a bit from arthritis a little help tightening the die is gratefully accepted.

Hornady and Sinclair International make wrenches that fit the Hornady lock rings. Both are aluminum so you do not want to "hog" down on them but they provided the little extra torque to keep the die from loosening in use.

The Hornady wrench is also useful with items on the L-N-L progressive.

chhodge69
September 28, 2012, 11:36 AM
Give them a thorough inspection when they arrive. My most recent purchase was saturated with machine oil and had not been properly cleaned after milling. I had to remove metal filings from inside the dies. I cleaned them up and they work fine. Oh - I also had to polish the flare die insert to stop it from being so "grabby" on the down-stroke but that's my personal preference - some say it's supposed to work that way.

The o-ring lock nuts work just fine once you flip the nut over so the o-ring points up.

joecil
September 28, 2012, 12:51 PM
I agree as I have 4 dies for 4 different setups of Lee dies and use the Hornady lock rings and they work great.

JohnM
September 28, 2012, 12:57 PM
The o-ring lock nuts work just fine once you flip the nut over so the o-ring points up.

Doing that totally defeats the reason for the O-ring.
Oh well, whatever.

thump_rrr
September 28, 2012, 01:02 PM
Yep. +1 on Hornady lock rings. They are the best. If only I could develop a tool like a long socket to extend down over the dies and engage the Hornady lock rings to snug them down into the press.
You mean like this one?
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/191984/hornady-lock-n-load-deluxe-die-locking-ring-wrench
http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/LargeImage.aspx?sku=8-HORN-396495

cfullgraf
September 28, 2012, 01:34 PM
Lee dies and never had a problem with settings changing.


I have a pile of Lee lock rings removed from Lee dies. I do find uses for them.

The best use I have is on powder measures, I have 6 powder measures. I use the Lee ring and o-ring to hold the measure in place on the powder measure stand. With the Lee lock ring, i can get the ring tight enough by hand to hold the powder measure tight when I swap out measures. Also, I use them on my powder measure storage stand where the powder measures live when not in active use.

I have one one my powder cop die on the Hornady Progressive. I adjust the die frequently at cartridge changes and the Lee rings let me do that quickly. But, I recently removed the o-ring because it slowed the adjustment process down. Without the o-ring, I can get the die locked enough to stay put.

i have been know to use two Lee lock rings on a die, jammed together locked in the position that I adjusted the die for. Not as sexy as a clamping lock ring and more difficult to set, but it worked when I could not get clamping lock rings.

tglazie
September 28, 2012, 02:17 PM
Give them a thorough inspection when they arrive. My most recent purchase was saturated with machine oil and had not been properly cleaned after milling. I had to remove metal filings from inside the dies. I cleaned them up and they work fine. Oh - I also had to polish the flare die insert to stop it from being so "grabby" on the down-stroke but that's my personal preference - some say it's supposed to work that way.

The o-ring lock nuts work just fine once you flip the nut over so the o-ring points up.

Agreed about the inspection and clean. Disagree with removing the powder drop "jiggle" functionality that Lee designed. That "grab" shakes free any clinging powder for more consistent drops.

The o-rings work fine for me.

ranger335v
September 28, 2012, 07:35 PM
[I]"Anything I should know about these Lee dies?

ranger335v
September 28, 2012, 07:36 PM
"Anything I should know about these Lee dies? I wouldn't think so, but I know some folks say they are not as good as the others."

Yeah, and then they stop; no meaningful data to support the statement. Lee has been selling dies for a very long time, if they weren't as good as any of their type that wouldn't be true. Fact is, our guns will never know what brand of dies our ammo was made with! Most dies have small user trivial differences that some people like or dislike but, functionally, a die is a die so a competent reloader can use any of them quite easily.

Those who don't understand why Lee's handgun expanders are made the way they are often 'fix' 'em to defeat the function they are made to preform but, if you're not using them on a progressive press, that won't matter. Ditto Lee's soft seat lock rings. Those who mistakenly think dies should be locked in with wrenches or pliers tend to hate 'em but there's no reason to install dies more than hand tight and for that the O ring design, properly used, works great. I have a lot of dies from a lot of makers and haven't felt a need to change a lock ring on any of them.

I can't imagine using new dies of any brand without cleaning them first. (Ditto before shooting a 'new' firearm, etc.)

Lost Sheep
September 28, 2012, 09:30 PM
Yep. +1 on Hornady lock rings. They are the best. If only I could develop a tool like a long socket to extend down over the dies and engage the Hornady lock rings to snug them down into the press.
Something like this?

http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Plumbing-Tools-Specialty-Tools-Wrenches/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqlu/R-100015414/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051

Good luck.

Lost Sheep

ljnowell
September 28, 2012, 09:46 PM
I have almost exclusively all Lee dies except for a single RCBS and a single Redding. I prefer the Lee over both of those. That being said, I think the Lee shell holders suck. Too sloppy. I find myself having to align cases to go into dies and then when going fast I have pinched a finger a few times.

FROGO207
September 28, 2012, 09:53 PM
I like Ruger, Savage, and Lee---there those that would say I have poor taste.:banghead:

cfullgraf
September 28, 2012, 10:06 PM
...but there's no reason to install dies more than hand tight and for that the O ring design, properly used, works great.

Right, the O-ring design does a good job of holding the die in the press with only hand tight torque. I would not mind if the feature was included with the other manufacturer's dies.

The trouble with Lee's lock ring is it is not locked to the die. You may not lose your setting today when you remove the die, but you will at some point lose your setting.

Or, you will spend time checking and adjusting your die setting each time you reinstall it in the press.

Sorry, the Lee lock nut is just not a positive enough stop for me. An eighth of turn of the nut is almost 0.009" change in position of the die.

gspn
September 28, 2012, 10:20 PM
I have Lee dies in 10mm, 45 acp, .357 mag, .41 mag, .44 mag, 7mm mag, .243, and a few others...I use them just the way they come out of the box. I've loaded thousands of rounds of ammo and I've not yet had a hiccup out of any of them. They work well.

tglazie
September 28, 2012, 10:54 PM
I like Ruger, Savage, and Lee---there those that would say I have poor taste.:banghead:

Hahaha well said!

fol4321
September 29, 2012, 12:09 AM
i havent had any problems, i also dont like the lock rings and switched them out for ones with a set screw

GLOOB
September 29, 2012, 01:34 AM
Sorry, the Lee lock nut is just not a positive enough stop for me. An eighth of turn of the nut is almost 0.009" change in position of the die.

I tend to tighten down my non-critical dies to the nearest point where a point of the hexagon points straight forward. There's a little knob on my press at this location. That way I get repeated settings, albeit having to choose the nearest 1/6th of a turn.

For the seating dies, good call on the Hornady lock rings, or whatnot.

mljdeckard
September 29, 2012, 02:18 AM
I'm still a bit of a rookie myself, but I have been very pleased with the quality of lee products in general. Mine seem to stay where I need them, but I will look at some of the Hornady lock rings.

GLOOB
September 29, 2012, 05:51 AM
One thing of note. The charge-thru-expander is a bit rough on most all my Lee pistol dies. You might wanna unscrew it and examine the expander. It could probably use a bit of polishing. A rough expander can start galling, sticking, and scratching the inside of your case mouths.

cleanview
September 29, 2012, 08:45 AM
lee gets bashed a lot. Thats all I have used and have never had any problems. Everthing from casting to loading. just sayin.

James2
September 29, 2012, 09:46 AM
Lee dies work fine for me. As others have said, I don't like their lock rings. Yes, the O-ring holds the die fine after you get it adjusted. However I load single stage and every time I take the die out then put it back in, it has to be adjusted again. Never has their been an exception to this. With real lock rings, you set the screw and you can take them out and when returned, they are still in adjustment. Ya, the Hornady lock rings is the way I went too. However, if you add the cost of the lock rings to the dies, then the price of the Lee dies doesn't look so appealing any more. I have never felt the need to tighten the dies into the press with any more than finger pressure. That holds them securely for me.

Kp321
September 29, 2012, 10:55 AM
Lee dies have worked well for me but I agree with the lock ring statements. I have also found the dies too short to mount properly in some presses, only a thread or two showing above the press top when adjusted. Replacement lock rings are a necessity in this case. I have removed the o-ring from the Lee lock rings and drilled and tapped for set screws. The lock rings can then be installed upside down as mentioned and still lock. A little work but cheaper than new locks.

jaguarxk120
September 29, 2012, 11:11 AM
If it's the lock rings, why didn't you just buy the Hornady die set?

lee dies 38.50 plus 17.50 for hornady lock rings.

Hornady die set 43.00

jcwit
September 29, 2012, 11:25 AM
lee dies 38.50

Thats MSRP. From FS Reloading they're alot less expensive.

$22.48 for Lee Pacesetter and $24.98 for Pistol 3 die sets.

Check it out https://fsreloading.com/

HOWARD J
September 29, 2012, 11:51 AM
I don't worry about locking rings anymore--I use a Lee 4 hole turret press.
The dies are tight on the turret--the only thing I might have to change is the bullet seating depth--no more moving dies. I have a 4 hole turret for each caliber. I did have a turret for each caliber on my Dillon's but I am not in a hurry anymore.------------------------:)

zxcvbob
September 29, 2012, 12:14 PM
Buy a small package of Forster lock rings. Use them on your seating/crimping dies. The Lee rings are fine for sizing and flaring because those dies are so easy to adjust.

Some people like the o-ring in the Lee dies because it holds the die less rigidly and it can find its center on the case.

cfullgraf
September 29, 2012, 12:33 PM
If it's the lock rings, why didn't you just buy the Hornady die set?



The reason I stopped buying Lee dies is I wanted different lock rings and a different storage box.

While buying Lee dies, different lock rings, and a new storage box is still a bit less than the other manufacturer dies, I frequently would find one of the component out of stock at my vendor of choice. By the time I spent time looking for an alternate source and paid the additional shipping, or worse buy some more stuff that I really did not need, I spent more than buying the other dies in the first place.

Or, sometimes multi packs of the die lock rings are not available. The individual cost of the rings then gets lots more expensive.

I have not purchased any Lee dies since the early nineties because of this. And, money was tighter for me then. The one stop shopping was worth the extra expense.

Also, I really do not need to add to my pile of shell holders or powder scoops.

But, for the fellow just beginning to get into reloading, the Lee dies can be a great start. With the knowledge from others, he can form his own opinion.

scythefwd
September 29, 2012, 01:23 PM
I love how people state that the lee dies cannot hold their settings.

All I use are lee dies, some have lyman lock rings on them, some hornady, and some kept the lee lock rings.

To keep your settings, tighten and loosen the dies by the lock ring, not the die of the body, just like it says in the instructions that came with my dies. I've never had a die drift.

Oh, and you can use an adjustable wrench to get a hold of the ring and be just fine. You can tighten them down as hard as your heart wants.. just stop using the die body to do it.. use the lock ring.

dickttx
September 29, 2012, 02:25 PM
As a confirmed tightwad I cannot see paying $16 for lockrings for each set of dies. That is about 50% of the cost of the dies.

Uniquedot
September 29, 2012, 03:50 PM
To keep your settings, tighten and loosen the dies by the lock ring, not the die of the body, just like it says in the instructions that came with my dies. I've never had a die drift.

Yep, they hold the setting just fine...they never move unless you turn the die body. I have Lee lock rings on many of my Lyman, RCBS, and Hornady dies as well. Internet rumors spread fast and before you know it forums all over the www will have the "Lee lock rings don't hold zero for me" myth postings all over again.

KansasSasquatch
September 29, 2012, 05:38 PM
If you like the Lee rings, sure you can get by with them. For most people the Hornady, or similar, lock rings are going to work better. The price of buying a set for each caliber might seem like a good bit of money but over the lifetime of the dies it's not that big of an investment. It comes down to personal preference. I prefer to use Hornady rings on the 2 sets of Lee dies that I own.

Hondo 60
September 29, 2012, 06:13 PM
Yeah, and then they stop; no meaningful data to support the statement. Fact is, your guns will never know what brand of dies your ammo was made with! Most dies have some small user trivial differences that some people like or dislike but, functionally, a die is a die so a competent reloader can use any of them quite easily.

Basically I agree with ranger335v.

I have 10 sets of dies.
7 of them are Lee.
The only difference I see is that the opening on the sizing die is less flared on Lee dies than any other set I own.
So once in a great while it'll crush the edge of the case.
Mostly just when I get careless.

mljdeckard
September 29, 2012, 06:45 PM
Whoa guys, check the price again. It's $17.49 (From Midway,) for a pack of SIX. That's $9 for a set of dies if you put them on ALL THREE. If I used them at all, I would probably just put one on the seater die. This means it's an additional $3 per die set. Where the heck are YOU GUYS buying the things?

jcwit
September 29, 2012, 07:00 PM
mljdeckard, many, many folks never shop for price, they see, they buy, they pay.

I look at it differently after a career in purchasing for one of the largest RV manufacturers and owning my own business till retirement.

doubleh
September 29, 2012, 08:15 PM
I have a few sets of Lee dies and like them except for the lock rings. Owning a drill press and a tap and die set I just drilled and tapped each ring for a #8x32 set screw. Quick, easy, effective, and very CHEAP.

teddy52food
September 29, 2012, 08:55 PM
I use Lee dies too & after getting them set I use a marker pen on the die and press and lock ring. They all should line up the next time too.

cfullgraf
September 29, 2012, 11:02 PM
As a confirmed tightwad I cannot see paying $16 for lockrings for each set of dies. That is about 50% of the cost of the dies.

Right, everyone needs to decide what is more valuable to them--time or out of pocket cash.

jcwit
September 29, 2012, 11:11 PM
Being as I own a lathe I make my own lock rings for next to nothing except my time, being as I'm now retired, there times its nice to have something to do at 2:00AM when I can not sleep.

dickttx
September 29, 2012, 11:27 PM
"Right, everyone needs to decide what is more valuable to them--time or out of pocket cash."

I quit reloading for about 40 years because of time. Now that I am 75 years old, I try to keep what cash I can. A lock ring here and a lock ring there and I soon have enough for another Colt.:D

cfullgraf
September 29, 2012, 11:31 PM
Being as I own a lathe I make my own lock rings for next to nothing except my time, being as I'm now retired, there times its nice to have something to do at 2:00AM when I can not sleep.

Same here but my shop is directly below the master bedroom. The wife frowns on midnight projects that disrupts her sleep. She still works.:)

Ehtereon11B
September 30, 2012, 12:09 AM
I vastly prefer the Lee Pacesetter dies when I can get them. I do not use the lock rings or bushings on my Lee dies but instead I add another step which works for me. I keep 3 or 4 rounds from a batch of loads I do that I really like. I put that cartridge in the press and set the die off that for seating depth. Works just fine for my consistency and accuracy. RCBS dies seem more crudely made compared to the Lee dies I have, and unfortunately Lee doesn't make a die for everything *cough* .35Remington

thomis
September 30, 2012, 09:15 AM
I found the Hornady lock ring (http://www.ebay.com/itm/200821733597?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649) for cheap on ebay. But if I had thought about it, I could just remove the lock ring on some older Lyman sets I have. Like the 30/30. I just don't load for the 30/30 anymore so those dies are just sitting in the box.

Arkansas Paul
September 30, 2012, 10:31 AM
Love Lee dies. Love Lee lockrings. You don't want your die to get out of adjustment, don't turn the die itself. Turn only the lock ring. I would buy Lee dies even if they were the same price as the rest. I love the seating depth adjustment on the Lees. You can adjust the depth with your fingers.
My .243 dies are RCBS because they were on sale. They now have Lee lock rings on them.

zxcvbob
September 30, 2012, 01:55 PM
If you have a Forster Co-Ax press, it's not obvious but the Lee lockrings work just fine in it too.

I like other rings better than Lee's, but not *that* much better. I use both.

If you have a progressive press with multiple heads (or use Hornady or Lee quick-change bushings), check out the Dillon rings that are just a skinny jam nut.

Condor1970
September 30, 2012, 02:02 PM
So here's a dumb noob question.

With the Lee classic cast Breech Lock press, do the dies maintain proper spacing when readily removed and replaced during a loading session?

Or, is it best to get one of those adjustable dies (like Redding) for the bullet seat?

JohnM
September 30, 2012, 02:28 PM
So here's a dumb noob question.

With the Lee classic cast Breech Lock press, do the dies maintain proper spacing when readily removed and replaced during a loading session?

Or, is it best to get one of those adjustable dies (like Redding) for the bullet seat?


? All dies are adjustable. Lee's will remain where set until the die body is moved in relation to the lock nut.
Some people seem to have a problem with that. I never have.

ranger335v
September 30, 2012, 04:21 PM
"Sorry, the Lee lock nut is just not a positive enough stop for me. An eighth of turn of the nut is almost 0.009" change in position of the die. "

No need to be sorry, I don't mind! :)

But, as mentioned several times above, if we hold the lock ring to install and remove the dies (as the instructions tell us to do) there's no reason for Lee's rings to ever move. And, if they do move, I don't find it very difficult nor time consuming to reset a die, not since I got over being a noob anyway! ???

I strongly dislike set screws in lock rings but I don't make an issue of them; I prefer any split rings but I can live with anything, I'm sure not going to buy extra cost rings - nor turn any on my lathe!

cfullgraf
September 30, 2012, 10:14 PM
But, as mentioned several times above, if we hold the lock ring to install and remove the dies (as the instructions tell us to do) there's no reason for Lee's rings to ever move.

Removing the dies by turning the nut did not work in my experience, the dies still moved relative to the nut on occasions when installing and removing the dies. I will admit that I stopped buying Lee loading dies in the mid 90s so maybe Lee "fixed" them since then. I am not willing or interested to spend the money to find out.

I prefer split lock ring dies so I do not bother installing set screws in the Lee rings. Set screws are a reasonable alternative though.

So, if Lee lock rings float your boat, that is great. It is another Ford/Chevy debate that will never end.

cfullgraf
September 30, 2012, 10:29 PM
I find it interesting that Lee makes a Breech Lock bushing with a spit lock ring built into it.

Lost Sheep
October 1, 2012, 01:35 AM
I find it interesting that Lee makes a Breech Lock bushing with a spit lock ring built into it.
Is it possible that Lee recognizes that people have different needs and different preferences?

Lost Sheep

scythefwd
October 1, 2012, 06:51 AM
Removing the dies by turning the nut did not work in my experience, the dies still moved relative to the nut on occasions when installing and removing the dies. I will admit that I stopped buying Lee loading dies in the mid 90s so maybe Lee "fixed" them since then. I am not willing or interested to spend the money to find out.


How did the dies move if they weren't being touched, and therefore were being moved by the nut? Where would the drag have been coming from (or were you really torquing down that die body into the press and needing to "break" the die free instead of a simple twist?)

cfullgraf
October 1, 2012, 07:17 AM
How did the dies move if they weren't being touched, and therefore were being moved by the nut?

There is enough resistance between the die and the press that the lock ring turns on the die at times.

scythefwd
October 1, 2012, 10:42 AM
your press is tighter than mine on that hole then man..

ranger335v
October 1, 2012, 12:49 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfullgraf
I find it interesting that Lee makes a Breech Lock bushing with a spit lock ring built into it.

Is it possible that Lee recognizes that people have different needs and different preferences?

That would seem reasonable. Some people like Lee's rings, some don't. I don't like lock rings with set screws and I don't like 'quick change' die bushings at all but I have sense enough to know what I do and don't like isn't much of a gage for what's good or bad for others. Nor is a different preference a reflection on the other guy's intelligence!

JohnM
October 1, 2012, 01:01 PM
I have dies from about every US maker there is and was and I think with about every combination of lock rings/nuts there is.
They all work.
I'm not even sure I could point to one as favored over another.

Kyle M.
October 1, 2012, 01:06 PM
I've used both rcbs and lee does I prefer lee pistol dies for their powder through expander die. I prefer rcbs rifle dies because they seem to hold seating depth better for me.

Baryngyl
October 6, 2012, 06:18 AM
I have removed the o-ring from the Lee lock rings and drilled and tapped for set screws.
This is what I have done for some of mine.


Michael Grace

45Frank
October 6, 2012, 07:50 AM
I have used Lees, RCBS, Lyman and a few others over the years and always go back to Lee's. Once adjusted and locked they never seem to move. I do have some with the split nut and set screw I didn't really like them. Once you get used to something you figure out the quirks. Good Luck.
I like the idea of a turret press with 6 holes so once set all the dies don't have to be removed until you are complete.

GLOOB
October 7, 2012, 05:30 AM
Lock ring preference should be largely dependent on what kind of press you use.

Once adjusted and locked they never seem to move.
I agree, the nut doesn't move, if you aren't inept. But I also agree with Cfullgraf. The nut can move while screwing the die in/out, even if you turn just the nut. You may have to turn both, together, to ensure it doesn't move.

your press is tighter than mine on that hole then man..
It's not the "tightness" of the hole or the threading. No matter how loose the threading, the threads on the die will be pushing UP against the threads of the press as you torque the ring down. This can make the die stop moving while you turn just the nut. It might happen only with certain dies, at certain points of adjustment, but it certainly can happen on any press.

Of course, this is easily overcome with a little experience and feel, if you take care and pay attention when screwing in the die and nut together. BUT... you can still end up with small variations just due to where you stop torquing your die in the press. Cuz with the Lee rings, you can always manage to turn a bit more or less, depending on how tight you squash the O ring.

I tend to aim my adjustments to where one corner of the lock ring points to a specific mark on my press, so I know where I'm supposed to stop tightening. But this takes more time and attention, on top of making sure that the lock ring doesn't move in relation to the die.

The one benefit of the Lee rings is that they're faster and easier to adjust. No question, there.

So let's look at how people use dies. Over a lifetime, a SS press user might screw a die in/out hundreds of times and adjust it only on rare occasions. So the advantage for SS press users goes to Hornady split rings, IMO. (Or the Breechlock bushings, except they're more expensive.) Yeah, the hex screw locking rings are a relative PITA to adjust, but you don't have to do it very often. OTOH, the hundreds of times you screw the dies in/out, you can zip it in with one hand, turning the die from the top, without looking or paying attention. And when it stops, it's tight. You don't have to carefully torque it down another quarter-or-so, like with the Lee ring.

But the turret/progressive user that uses tool heads/turrets might screw a die in only once. So I don't see why anyone would object to the Lee ring, in this scenario. They'll stay put if you're not messing with them, AND they're easier to adjust when you WANT them to change.

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