Special Journal to Track Your Firearms?


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chanroc
October 3, 2012, 01:27 PM
I was just wondering what you all use to track your firearm possession. Is there a specific gun log you can buy or do you track them in a plain journal or spreadsheet? Thanks...

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Teachu2
October 3, 2012, 01:28 PM
Excel spreadsheet.

Reloadron
October 3, 2012, 01:32 PM
Yeah, just create an Excel or any other spreadsheet. That or just buy a simple notebook and add some columns. Anyway, I use an Excel spreadsheet.

Ron

Ian
October 3, 2012, 01:54 PM
I use MyGunDB - it does a whole lot more than my old Excel sheet did. I did a review of it here:

http://www.forgottenweapons.com/my-gun-database-software/

floorit76
October 3, 2012, 01:59 PM
I bought a nice hardbound ledger at staples for about $4 on clearance. We devoted about 5 pages to each letter.

RobNDenver
October 3, 2012, 02:00 PM
Excel Spreadsheet. Don't forget to mail it to yourself, and back it up in the cloud so that if some lowlife gets your guns and computer you have the serial numbers needed.

Claude Clay
October 3, 2012, 02:02 PM
50 page spiral 4 x 6" index card pad. same way i keep 1 in each car.
helps to keep track of events and costs at a glance.

Inebriated
October 3, 2012, 02:24 PM
Excel Spreadsheet works for me.

Spartacus
October 3, 2012, 02:38 PM
Notebook at home and a simple list I typed up in Word on my hard drive. I also emailed the list to myself (house fire in the past)

valnar
October 3, 2012, 02:42 PM
Excel

hso
October 3, 2012, 02:45 PM
Digital Pics

mgmorden
October 3, 2012, 02:53 PM
I've done several different things in the past (including an app I wrote myself), but for right now I keep everything in a Google Docs spreadsheet. Advantage of that over Excel is that its in the cloud.

Realistically the times when I'll likely need a full list of my guns is if they're stolen or the house burns down.

House burning down takes out the computer too. Stolen means they'll probably take the computer too. Having a cloud-based app tracking it ensures that the actual data isn't on my physical computer so if can access the list from anywhere that has a network connection.

PocketRocket
October 3, 2012, 02:58 PM
This old dog (devil-dog) missed this trick: What's a "cloud"?

mgmorden
October 3, 2012, 03:07 PM
This old dog (devil-dog) missed this trick: What's a "cloud"?

Cloud computing basically just means that the data is stored on a computer out on the internet rather than on your local computer.

Gmail is a good example of a cloud-based email provider. Doesn't matter which computer you sit down to - you log into Gmail and your email is also there.

Google also does similar functionality such as Google Docs, which is a word processor and spreadsheet program that runs in your browser. The files you save are stored on Google's servers, so no matter what computer you're on you always have access to your files.

They also have similar cloud based products for music, bookmarks, photo libraries, etc.

Some businesses even take it a step further outside of the application layer with things like Amazon's EC2 Cloud Computing technology. Basically you can store an entire "virtual" computer system in the cloud. It can be booted, you can remotely login to it, and it does all the same work that a local computer would, but its actually running on Amazon's servers.

Its a great way to minimize the risk of local damage taking out a system. The big cloud providers like Google and Amazon have replication and such running so that if one of their data centers was destroyed the cloud functionality automatically fails over to another facility.

Very good stuff from an IT perspective :).

Inebriated
October 3, 2012, 03:39 PM
^Windows Live SkyDrive works great as well. I have a Windows Phone, so any document I put on there I can access from my phone.

Destructo6
October 3, 2012, 04:29 PM
ATF had a booth at a recent gunshow and were distributing rulebooks, handbooks, and a small logbook for "Personal Firearms Log."

The form number is: P 3312.8 (12-03) and can be downloaded at:

http://www.atf.gov/publications/download/p/atf-p-3312-8.pdf

Reloadron
October 3, 2012, 07:10 PM
I took the time to look at that little My Gun DB (Data Base) that Ian linked to and reviewed. Actually it looks to be a slick little data base program for storing all your gun and accessory information in one nice little package including images. Unfortunately I didn't see a way to place the data base in a cloud but none the less considering a $40 price tag it is a nice and useful little piece of software and as mentioned runs on just about any operating system.

I had given thought to creating a simple Access Data Base and shoving it out there on a cloud or just leaving it on a local machine and letting it backup to a cloud once a week or so. If the software My Gun DB had a feature that allowed it to backup to a cloud location that would be pretty nice. While the software has a focus on a gun DB it could easily be expanded to My Jewelery, My Coin Collection, My Stamp Collection and My Just About Anything collections.

You really want your DB offsite so if a natural disaster strikes your data is safe and sound. Anyway, for the buck nice little program for those who feel the need. I like the scheduled maintenance feature too! :)

Ron

22-rimfire
October 3, 2012, 07:17 PM
Various spreadsheets with differing purposes. One documents the purchase or sale of a firearm and others are updated about every other year which are essentially a list without serial numbers with approximate market value. I subtract 30% as an overall offset between actual selling price and retail market value. I know I can do better in most cases.

udonb
October 3, 2012, 07:24 PM
I use an Excel spreadsheet plus an app for iPad called GunLog SPC. It has lots of features including ammo inventory, ballistics, range sessions, and photos. Good app. I think I paid $3.99.

M2 Carbine
October 3, 2012, 08:12 PM
Excel with five copies on other computers, flash drives, etc.

sig228
October 3, 2012, 10:38 PM
Excel spreadsheet with photos and adobe PDF scans of my purchase and sale documents. All saved in Dropbox. Accessible from any computer iPad or iPhone.

dc.fireman
October 3, 2012, 11:20 PM
Bento (for Mac's) using another Bento users firearms log/template. Allows for photo's, notes, etc. and thanks to the OP for reminding me to update it!

:D

TJx
October 4, 2012, 08:21 AM
Spreadsheet- I also have columns for round counts and rounds since last recoil spring change.
I recently started a word processing document to keep notes for each gun that details other stuff like jams, what type, which magazine was in it, etc.

Kristensdaddy
October 4, 2012, 09:07 AM
A friend of mine keeps his written record on the blank back pages of his Bible. He figures no one is going to steal a Bible.

Not kidding.

beatledog7
October 4, 2012, 09:36 AM
Cloud computing seems very convenient on its face, but I'd rather not put my firearms roster and serial numbers out there for some regulatory agency to sooner or later be given access to.

Tinfoil hat off. Carry on.

ForumSurfer
October 4, 2012, 09:55 AM
Pics of serial numbers on a photobucket account set so only I can view them.. If the internet breaks down and goes away, I doubt I'll be worried about insurance claims.

I really do get the cloud storage fears, but it is what it is...convenient. I no longer store anything locally and I'm okay with that.

Ryanxia
October 4, 2012, 10:02 AM
So you guys all keep a record nice and neat for if/when the ATF needs it? How nice.

I personally don't keep a record. If I get rid of something I make sure it's a legal sale at the time (which isn't much required) and then forget about it. If I were going to take the time to keep records I'd become an FFL.

ForumSurfer
October 4, 2012, 10:17 AM
So you guys all keep a record nice and neat for if/when the ATF needs it? How nice.

I personally don't keep a record. If I get rid of something I make sure it's a legal sale at the time (which isn't much required) and then forget about it. If I were going to take the time to keep records I'd become an FFL

If the ATF is going so far as to hack my account and get my data, the guns I legally own are the least of my worries.

If you've ever lost everything in a fire, you tend to get a little overzealous in keeping track of stuff. Not to mention if something gets stolen, I want to be able to report it.

elrowe
October 4, 2012, 10:24 AM
Excel spreadsheet and digital photos. Hardcopies and flash drive stored in home safe and in safe deposit box at the bank. Don't want to have any question of conditioin come up if I ever have to file a claim.

srtolly
October 4, 2012, 10:41 AM
I keep a written copy in my shop with pics. Found an app called Gun Tracker Pro on my phone that I can log range sessions and such. For $2 the app is worth it. Track round count, failures, cleaning sessions. A pic of the gun.

Sharps-shooter
October 4, 2012, 11:08 AM
I keep a written record in a hardbound journal. Also have .pdf backup of said journal (made by taking pictures of the journal with a pdf app on my phone), and pictures of the guns. This is partly to help me keep track and partly for insurance purposes. The electronic backup is in case the house burns down taking the journal with it.

mgmorden
October 4, 2012, 07:35 PM
Cloud computing seems very convenient on its face, but I'd rather not put my firearms roster and serial numbers out there for some regulatory agency to sooner or later be given access to.

Tinfoil hat off. Carry on.

The amount of effort needed to correlate all that data in non-standard formats from various different sources would exceed the effort needed to just locate the guns themselves. Trust me I work as a database admin for the government (not anything too secret or bad though - mostly just processing taxes :)). Each data import needs to be approached individually - it would be a lot of work.

Ehtereon11B
October 4, 2012, 07:37 PM
Rite in the Rain leaderbook. I guess I am old school for using paper instead of computer. Same book contains favorite loading data for various calibers.

SlowFuse
October 4, 2012, 09:04 PM
I have excel spreadsheets that are saved on multiple computers, home and away from home. Also have picture compilations, same deal. For an actual written book, I made this. I work at a publishing company and did the spiral binding in my spare time. Has heavy clear coat covers on top of 120# cardstock. Almost as good as a hard bound book.

http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo67/SloFoFo/IMG-20121004-00430.jpg

ForumSurfer
October 4, 2012, 09:53 PM
The amount of effort needed to correlate all that data in non-standard formats from various different sources would exceed the effort needed to just locate the guns themselves. Trust me I work as a database admin for the government (not anything too secret or bad though - mostly just processing taxes :)). Each data import needs to be approached individually - it would be a lot of work.

Exactly. It'd take a focused effort on one individual that would be hands on and above/beyond standard data mining...so they'd likely be after you for something bad you did. :)


Sent from my broken iPhone using Tapatalk...pm me if you're selling a non-broken Verizon iPhone.

psyopspec
October 5, 2012, 03:41 PM
I use a file on my iPhone (dictated, so no typing required), backed up on iCloud.

sirgilligan
October 7, 2012, 12:47 PM
I use an Excel spreadsheet plus an app for iPad called GunLog SPC. It has lots of features including ammo inventory, ballistics, range sessions, and photos. Good app. I think I paid $3.99.

I hope you didn't pay $3.99, it is only $0.99.
There are three Gun Log apps.

Gun Log doesn't use iCloud, nor printing or email. This is for those that do not want the data on servers that may be used in investigations.

Gun Log SPC doesn't use iCloud but does allow to print and email the data. This is the one I use.

Gun Log +P does use iCloud. That means the data is uploaded to Apple servers and then distributed to all of your devices. Enter a firearm on one device, it shows up automatically on the others.

I did some screen shots of various Gun apps for iOS that I own:

http://gunappreviews.blogspot.com/

With the Gun Log apps, you can connect the device to a computer and via iTunes you can copy the database file to the hard drive. If you happen to know about SQL you can then write queries to populate spread sheets or do any type of analysis you want. You can also just email your data to yourself if you use GL-SPC or GL+P.

I wrote Gun Log myself. It is a range log first. I use it to track failures and group size mostly.

I have truly improved my accuracy since tracking my shooting. I can look and see quickly how I did last time, the stance and grip I used on my best group, etc.

Here is an example:
http://shottingbuddy.blogspot.com/2012/09/cz-85b-125-group-7-yards.html

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Zgm0N8fcmLw/UFCRxjU9pCI/AAAAAAAACtY/027IS9KzI_0/s640/czt.png

If you are an iOS user, I think Gun Log SPC does a good job. A note pad does pretty good for a range log, but analysis is more difficult. A camera and a text file can log details for insurance purposes.

Here is a description:

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/gun-log/id443611628?mt=8
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/gun-log-+p/id498559261?mt=8
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/gun-log-spc/id551016396?mt=8

with_teeth
October 8, 2012, 04:39 PM
ATF had a booth at a recent gunshow and were distributing rulebooks, handbooks, and a small logbook for "Personal Firearms Log."

The form number is: P 3312.8 (12-03) and can be downloaded at:

http://www.atf.gov/publications/down...f-p-3312-8.pdf




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45lcshooter
October 9, 2012, 07:27 PM
Excel spreadsheet. And little note book hidden from sight.

gojuice101
October 9, 2012, 09:49 PM
As a C&R holder, I got in the habit of maintaining records for my C&R guns. I decided it was probably a good idea to maintain a record of all my guns, so I use a separate book for those.

I looked into programs like MyGunDB, but being a computer geek I actually wrote my own inventory program to keep electronic logs. I feel pretty secure because I have my electronic logs, and also backup paper logs kept in a safe.

Trent
October 10, 2012, 12:35 PM
Another +1 for Excel spreadsheet.

I keep a copy on my work computer as well, in case the house is a total loss, along with digital photos of them. That way I'll still have a current copy and proof of ownership off-site for the insurance folks.

berettaprofessor
October 10, 2012, 12:51 PM
I set it up as a Quicken account....not only can you record descriptions, costs, serial numbers, etc, you can tag photos of the guns and scans of the receipts to each entry.

siglite
October 10, 2012, 12:53 PM
Another vote for mygundb. It tracks all kinds of useful stuff, and is very lightweight.

Sulaco
October 10, 2012, 01:47 PM
I use DropBox and keep a record of item descriptions/serial numbers of all of my valuable items in a document. I just do it for general record keeping purposes (like in case of a fire or theft, etc.).

I like DropBox because it real-time (instantly) synchronizes any changes I make across all of my devices. I have it on my work PC, my Mac at home, my Android phone, and it's available via the dropbox.com website. It also keeps multiple copies of recently edited documents in case I accidentally delete one, it becomes corrupt and I need to recover to an earlier one, etc. Very handy.

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