Why own more 1 of the same model?


PDA






monotonous_iterancy
October 4, 2012, 10:50 PM
It seems like there's a good number of people out there who own more than one firearm of the same model. People with multiple Mosins, SKSs, ARs, and so on.

My question is, why would you do that? If you already have one, and it shoots the same round, then what's the point?

I get that maybe there's a gun they shoot, and a much nicer one they keep for looks, or perhaps there's wide variations in quality between manufacturers, but for those of you who have several of the same guns, why?

If you enjoyed reading about "Why own more 1 of the same model?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
TurtlePhish
October 4, 2012, 10:53 PM
Mosins- they're pieces of history. Each one is different from the next, sometimes in big ways, sometimes subtle. There's just something about them that makes them fun to collect, shoot, and look at.

easy
October 4, 2012, 10:56 PM
One for me, one for her.

-v-
October 4, 2012, 10:56 PM
Different setups on each, or just the joy of collecting. That and as someone said Two is one and one is none. Things break.

crazy-mp
October 4, 2012, 10:57 PM
Several reasons, one caliber is easier to buy for than 67, if one breaks you have parts to keep the other one going, some people find a gun they really enjoy shooting and want to be able to have their friends, kids or grand kids shoot the same gun with them. Some guns like the 10/22 or AR have literally millions of variations so one can be made to look like a Tommy gun and another one can be built like a heavy barreled target rifle.

As far as collecting goes, some guns have more variations than you can imagine, for example the Russian 91/30's they were made for over 40 years, several different makings are on those guns and they made over 17 million, several million have been imported into the U.S. and they are still a affordable gun for people to collect. So they can get a nice collection of military surplus guns and not spend two weeks pay to get each one.

TAKtical
October 4, 2012, 10:57 PM
Glock 17's I have one in every color.

19-3Ben
October 4, 2012, 10:57 PM
Several reasons:
1) Investment purposes- sometimes when a gun is no longer made, and is collectible, it pays to buy multiples so that in the future you can sell off several at a profit and keep one for yourself. (wish I had done this with Yugo SKSs when i could find them for $125.)

2) SHTF purposes- if you can get a few inexpensive guns like a Mosin Nagants, or single shot 12ga shotguns, and hand them to your friends and family who show up in an emergency, that may have tremendous strategic value. Additionally, having a full spare gun means you have every spare part needed to repair your primary gun. You just have to cannibalize off the back-up.

3) Platform similarity- If you are accustomed to a certain platform, like a Glock 19. It may pay to have one set up for carry, one on the nightstand with a light attached, one banging around in the truck, etc... and just keep the muscle memory you have developed for the platform.

4) Just 'cuz- my favorite of all the reasons. It's why I have several Mosin Nagants. They were cheap, and allowed me to turn $70 into a new (to me) rifle!

blarby
October 4, 2012, 10:59 PM
Parts, parts, parts- thats the first thing that comes to mind.

Second- Ammo. Already been said.

Third- if you are good with something, having two is never problematic.

Walkalong
October 4, 2012, 11:02 PM
Well, if you are talking say....357 revolvers, there are so many cool ones to pick from, ya just can't buy only one. I have a Ruger, a Colt, a Dan Wesson, and a Smith. As it should be.

Exactly the same gun? Well, I have a blue 6" Trooper Mk III, and a nickle 6" Trooper Mk III, just because I like them. :)

musicman10_1
October 4, 2012, 11:06 PM
I'm fighting against this in my collection as well. I have some duplicates but the reasons are simple:
1) the deal was too good to pass up (2nd Turk Mauser)
2) one is for shooting (M1 Garand Service Grade) and one is for the future (M1 Garand Correct Grade)

I have a couple of ARs but one is 20" more traditional and one is 16" and more tactical (rails, foregrip, eotech, collapsable stock, etc., and so not exactly a duplicate to me.

I had 2 SKS rifles but decided that the Russian was what I wanted to keep and so the Yugo was sold to fund something else.

And so it goes - I am really trying not to have much duplication in my collection as there are so many different firearms that I want to own.

Kiln
October 4, 2012, 11:06 PM
I have very few duplicates in my collection. The ones I do have either have different finishes or calibers.

monotonous_iterancy
October 4, 2012, 11:07 PM
But couldn't you say that it ties up money that could be used to diversify your collection?

gspn
October 4, 2012, 11:11 PM
I have multiple AR's. A few will go with my kids when they get their own homes. Others are a hedge against future laws that might prohibit buying them later. Others still can be sold at a profit if those future laws take hold.

Ive got the money...and id rather buy a gun than a CD that offers no return.;)

Sharps-shooter
October 4, 2012, 11:21 PM
People buy guns for different reasons, and sometimes people buy multiples o the same gun for different reasons.

shinerjohn
October 4, 2012, 11:23 PM
I have 2 Uberti Cattleman .45 Colt because in cowboy action shooting, 2 single action revolvers are required. I have 3 Hi-Powers, but they are actually different: FEG, FM M90, and MK III.
The only guns I have true multiples of are C&R: 4 Polish P64's, 3 CZ82's, and 2 East German Makarovs. I simply like the 9x18 caliber and these will never decline in value.

I normally wouldn't buy a duplicate of the exact same model... but I did!

Tinpig
October 4, 2012, 11:32 PM
I have two '03s, two M1 Garands, two M1 Carbines, and two sons.
They already enjoy them as much as I do.
Now if I can get my daughters shooting I can buy two more of everything.
:D

Tinpig

Warp
October 4, 2012, 11:33 PM
It seems like there's a good number of people out there who own more than one firearm of the same model. People with multiple Mosins, SKSs, ARs, and so on.

My question is, why would you do that? If you already have one, and it shoots the same round, then what's the point?

I get that maybe there's a gun they shoot, and a much nicer one they keep for looks, or perhaps there's wide variations in quality between manufacturers, but for those of you who have several of the same guns, why?

For some of those...especially the rifles, and especially the ARs, you can have two of the same model that are set up very differently. Or 3 or 4 or more all set up differently.

There is also the "two is one, one is none". When you find what you like, and what works for you, the best backup is an additional one.

M2
October 4, 2012, 11:35 PM
Are all cars the same? No? Well, the same applies to firearms.

oneounceload
October 4, 2012, 11:37 PM
Having two exactly the same? Comes in handy with a CCW gun - if one is out of order for one reason or another, you have one and already know how to operate it

ConstitutionCowboy
October 4, 2012, 11:38 PM
It's for the same reason everyone in a squad will have the same gun. They all use the same ammo, and the ammo will fit every one of them - but I repeat myself.

The secret is to have several guns in different classes all using the same ammo, such as carbines and hand guns using the same cartridge. Examples are revolvers/pistols and carbines in 357 MAG, or 45ACP, or 44-40, or 22LR, or .223, etc. It's for versatility. Lord knows what will be available and when. Cover your bases.

Also, things break. It'd be terrible to have tons of ammo and the only gun that shoots it is broken.

Woody

deadin
October 4, 2012, 11:39 PM
Here's 5 nearly identical... Three Hartford M1925's, one HS Model B and a Hartford Single Shot

http://deadin.info/webpics/HarHR.jpg

tarosean
October 4, 2012, 11:46 PM
[Are all cars the same? No? Well, the same applies to firearms.

Your analogy is flawed. You can buy the same vehicles with the exact same options and guess what? They are the same... just as two colt 1911 LW Commander 80's or two Glock 17 3rd gens.. Mass production ensures that.

I wouldn't buy two exact same cars/trucks just as I wouldnt buy two identical,makes models of firearm. Not that there is anything wrong with that, just not for me.

Hunter125
October 4, 2012, 11:54 PM
People buy guns for different reasons, and sometimes people buy multiples o the same gun for different reasons.

Oh so helpful...

I plan on filling all my needs first, then duplicating things like ARs, 10/22s, etc for the multiple setup same platform idea. And possibly for things like a dedicated truck gun, though I'm not sold on that idea yet.

Onward Allusion
October 5, 2012, 12:02 AM
monotonous_iterancy
Why own more 1 of the same model?

That's easy! Remember the old saying - "Beware the man with one gun." ?

Having multiples of the same make/model is exactly that. Just as one example on make/model - me personally, I shoot 5906, 59, 915, 5903, 5946, along with their TSW brethren at the range for pleasure, practice, draw...etc for SD and my 5906TSW is my nightstand gun. I have 'em stashed in various places, just in case. I also have tons of spare parts if it really gets rainy. Finally, my boys won't have to fight over which one they'll get when I'm dead and gone. With regard to the 59XX, I'm pretty darn comfortable with one... ;)

I also do this with several other make/models, long-gun or handgun. Actually, I usually have at least two of each. :eek:

Onward Allusion
October 5, 2012, 12:07 AM
M2
Are all cars the same? No? Well, the same applies to firearms.

Now that you mentioned it, I did have 2 Dodge Ram 1500's, 2 Dodge Spirits, & 2 Dodge Shadows at the same time. :D

Totally serious here. I guess I subscribe to the Two is One school of thought. :D

wrench
October 5, 2012, 12:12 AM
Besides, Mosin's are like snowflakes-no two are really alike:neener:

Seriously, my goal is not to diversify my collection, I'm trying for depth rather than breadth.

weblance
October 5, 2012, 12:34 AM
Having two exactly the same? Comes in handy with a CCW gun - if one is out of order for one reason or another, you have one and already know how to operate it

This was my reasoning for having 2 LCPs and 2 LC9s. I also have 2 P95s, one upstairs and one downstairs.

waterhouse
October 5, 2012, 01:28 AM
If my off duty carry gun goes down, I have several spares that are identical. . . Same holsters, same manual of arms, etc.

Same holds true for my duty pistol and my work rifle and home defense shotgun. At this very moment my shotgun is at the smith after I broke the sight off in training. Nice to have a spare.

I don't have too many duplicates of hunting or target or other "fun" guns, but the ones that I defend myself with have backups, sometimes several.

ColtPythonElite
October 5, 2012, 01:31 AM
Because I can....

gspn
October 5, 2012, 01:34 AM
Because I can....
That is the most awesome combination of username and answer that I've ever seen.

"coltpythonelite" says "because I can".

Much of our free market society is summed up right there...it's perfect. I wish I could have summed it up so succinctly.

ColtPythonElite
October 5, 2012, 01:51 AM
Heck, less than 12 hrs ago I bought another duplicate....another Python.:D

49north
October 5, 2012, 01:55 AM
Because I can.

Justin
October 5, 2012, 02:16 AM
My question is, why would you do that? If you already have one, and it shoots the same round, then what's the point?

Why wouldn't you have redundancy built into your collection? There are a number of distinct advantages to primarily settling on one particular platform.

-Much easier to learn the manual of arms. No need to fumble for the safety or stop to try to remember where the magazine release is. Once you've trained on one gun, you're competent with all of them.

-Multiple copies of a particular firearms will help you to realize cost savings in accessories like holsters, slings, optics, magazines, and mag carriers.

-Multiple guns that share the same caliber are easier to deal with because it allows you to keep track of fewer calibers and makes it easier to take advantage of bulk purchases of ammunition. If you reload, it makes life easier because then you only have to worry about two or three primary calibers.

-If you have multiple guns that fill the same role, you automatically have redundant backups built in to your collection, so if one gun stops functioning, you can substitute another without having to worry about the difference in manual of arms, how the gun recoils, etc. In the case of a gun used for personal defense, if you use said gun to defend yourself, it will likely be confiscated, so you'll have to substitute something else. In other cases, for instance, competition, it really sucks to have a gun go down on you in the middle of a match when the lack of a backup will leave you sitting on the sidelines for the rest of the day.

armsmaster270
October 5, 2012, 02:21 AM
2 S&W 586's 4" & 6"
Revolvers
http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/PICT0101.jpg
Pistols
http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/Autos.jpg

Certaindeaf
October 5, 2012, 02:38 AM
Because America!

Certaindeaf
October 5, 2012, 02:39 AM
Heck, less than 12 hrs ago I bought another duplicate....another Python.:D
I hate you. lolz

ColtPythonElite
October 5, 2012, 02:45 AM
I couldn't pass up a bargain.:D

Twiki357
October 5, 2012, 03:18 AM
Not necessarily all the same model, but all S&W "J" frames. All basically the same, but still each is different.
Model 36 (No dash) 2" round butt
Model 36 (No dash) 2" square butt
Model 36 (No dash) 3" round butt
Model 60 (No dash) 2" round butt - Stainless
Model 637-2 2" round butt - Airweight
And I have my eye on a 37-2 - Airweight:), but it's about 80% condition and the guy has it priced as LNIB.:banghead:

mnrivrat
October 5, 2012, 05:41 AM
Because I'm Morman ;)

I couldn't pass up a bargain.

That's where mine have come from. I have one but when another comes along at a great price I may end up with two of the same. Generaly a temperary situation .

bannockburn
October 5, 2012, 07:23 AM
Mainly because I happen to like one certain platform (in this case, the M1911), more than most any other.

12131
October 5, 2012, 07:35 AM
It seems like there's a good number of people out there who own more than one firearm of the same model. People with multiple Mosins, SKSs, ARs, and so on.

My question is, why would you do that? If you already have one, and it shoots the same round, then what's the point?

I get that maybe there's a gun they shoot, and a much nicer one they keep for looks, or perhaps there's wide variations in quality between manufacturers, but for those of you who have several of the same guns, why?
Why not? Different strokes for different folks. Seriously. I like them. So I buy more of what I like. Very simple.

12131
October 5, 2012, 07:39 AM
But couldn't you say that it ties up money that could be used to diversify your collection?
People have different philosophies in collecting. I don't see why they have to fit your mold.

skeptical_in_Ohio
October 5, 2012, 08:16 AM
Even with same make/model/action, configuration can be different as noted elsewhere. I have three Marlin Semi-Autos - one in open sights (Williams Fire Sights to be precise) and one with a scope that the local smith made look pretty for my son to shoot. The third was a "Coast to Coast" Model 40 (store brand based on the Marlin 99C, a predecessor to the 60). It was $50, and the front sight (one of those big tube around the barrel small tube around the mag things) was destroyed.

I figured it'd be fun to see if I could repair it, so I got a couple of parts for it, and did something dumb leading to a dent on the mag tube (but was able to fix it by simply drilling out the dent). I think I didn't quite get the tube retainer pin in right as the tube slides in a little stiff (and that extra hole in the tube looks funny). All said, it shoots reliably and accurately and is worth within $10 of what I have in it.

Other .22's (different makes & models) - a couple of pump actions (one with and one without a scope), a bolt action with mag & scope, a single shot bolt (with scope), and a lever action (no scope).

22's are fun :).

Sav .250
October 5, 2012, 08:39 AM
Different strokes for different folks.................

mavracer
October 5, 2012, 09:03 AM
There are many different reasons one of mine is the fact that I have two hands.

Neo-Luddite
October 5, 2012, 09:23 AM
Because when you have twin sidearms you can refer to it as a 'Brace' of pistols and that's just wicked bad.

Also, twins are a complete set of spare parts in case of (sigh) TEOTWAWKI; nothing would (for example) suck worse that having 1 AK, 10K rounds of 7.62 x 39 Soviet, and a broken extractor.

ANd two is better than 1; I have two kids and I don't want them to fight over the gun collection when I depart.

brnmuenchow
October 5, 2012, 09:24 AM
There are many different types and variances in the models you mentioned ex. AK's, Mosin's many can have different setups, or model year-by-year variances M91/30's, M44's, M38's, etc... as said before some are more subtle and others not. The first two Mosins I purchased are a rounded 1945 model vs. older Hex 1935 model receiver. The color of both my '35 vs. '45 are also different one is more reddish in color than the other.:)

rbernie
October 5, 2012, 09:35 AM
But couldn't you say that it ties up money that could be used to diversify your collection? What value do you associate with diversification?

I value finding that which works best for me and my needs, and ensuring that I have those things available to me whenever and wherever I may be. That often means having duplicates; duplicate CCW pistols, duplicate hunting rifles, duplicate field shotguns, and so forth. Consider it a logical extension of the 'man with one gun' meme.

Makes sense to me.

speedway
October 5, 2012, 09:35 AM
The guns that I am passionate about are not made anymore. They can be harder to find, and the prices keep going up up up.

For instance, the HK P7 series.

Buy them now while they are still relatively affordable.

speedway
October 5, 2012, 09:36 AM
Not necessarily all the same model, but all S&W "J" frames. All basically the same, but still each is different.
Model 36 (No dash) 2" round butt
Model 36 (No dash) 2" square butt
Model 36 (No dash) 3" round butt
Model 60 (No dash) 2" round butt - Stainless
Model 637-2 2" round butt - Airweight
And I have my eye on a 37-2 - Airweight:), but it's about 80% condition and the guy has it priced as LNIB.:banghead:
I have a model 37 no dash in the classifieds, hint hint.


I also have a pre model 36. Great gun.

45_auto
October 5, 2012, 10:23 AM
I figure I need one of everything for myself, one for my wife, one for each of my three kids, and one for each of my grandkids. That means I need a minimum of 9 of each model out there right now. When I have great-grandkids they'll all need one too. I'll hopefully live another 20 or 30 years based on family history, so I figure by that time I should be in the neighborhood of needing somewhere around 2 dozen of everything out there. Might as well get them now, the stuff I want is just going to get harder to find and not going to get any cheaper.

waterhouse
October 5, 2012, 10:34 AM
But couldn't you say that it ties up money that could be used to diversify your collection?

I used to have a lot of guns in a very diverse collection. In pistols, I had Sigs, H&Ks, Glocks, Rugers, and a few others. I had revolvers made by Colt, Ruger, and Smith. All had slightly different manual of arms, and some had vastly different triggers. I got rid of most of them and settled on H&K P7s and 1911s. Now I'm down to 2 types of magazines, two holsters, etc. Cleared up a ton of clutter in my safe and closets, and I shoot better. I now see little need for "diversity". I found what works best for me and stocked up on it.

Queen_of_Thunder
October 5, 2012, 10:37 AM
Same boat as the above poster. Post #51.

Two sons and 4 grandchildren and a belief that in the future guns will be hard to get and prohibitively. expensive to shoot.

threoh8
October 5, 2012, 11:02 AM
Many years ago, a friend of my father had an unknown number of '94 Winchesters, all in .30-30, positioned around his ranch and vehicles in South Texas. His motto was "Thirty-thirty, for man or beast". Wherever he was, he had easy access to a rifle he knew well.

I'm thinking about getting an AR or three. Specifically, I'd like one full-size DCM-legal AR for service rifle matches, a full-on space gun as a match rifle and (scoped) as a varmint rifle, and a short/light carbine just for having.

I have few duplicates now, mainly because I'm cheap.

jmorris
October 5, 2012, 11:05 AM
Why not?

mdauben
October 5, 2012, 11:10 AM
Parts, parts, parts- thats the first thing that comes to mind.
Multiple guns is really a horribly inefficent way of stocking spare parts. The average gun probably has 2-3 parts that account for 99% of the replacement needs in that gun. I'd rather spend the $20-30 to stock that handful of parts, and spend the rest of the money on a different gun. ;)

TIMC
October 5, 2012, 01:05 PM
All AR's are not the same, I have 7 AR's in 4 different calibers and 7 different configurations.

I have 4 S&W handguns that are in 3 different calibers and 4 different configurations so they are not the same either.

Please do not lump guns together by name because that is like saying why would you own 2 Fords or two Chevys. One may be a truck and the other a car which are totally different.

Certaindeaf
October 5, 2012, 01:10 PM
Because you need five 1911's to get through one magazine.

Har, that was a joke.

JohnM
October 5, 2012, 01:14 PM
I don't go out to buy a duplicate gun usually, but if I spotted one I liked for what I thought was a good price whether I already had one or not wouldn't be a deciding factor.

leadcounsel
October 5, 2012, 01:28 PM
If you know you like it, why not? Doesn't lose money, future anti-gun laws, spare parts or spare gun(s), etc. Enough for your family/community in a disaster, etc.

I have many duplicates of excellent platforms. I appreciate the history, mechanical designs, etc. Some people collect garbage, I like useful guns.

Ryanxia
October 5, 2012, 01:40 PM
Different setups on each, or just the joy of collecting. That and as someone said Two is one and one is none. Things break.

Pretty well sums it up.

HankR
October 5, 2012, 02:04 PM
I have two children and would like one of each to pass on to them. That justifies the first two of any model ("Honey, it's for the chiiildren"). Somebody else might want 4 M1 Garands, one of each flavor. Duplicates of a carry gun for reasons mentioned, but then the preferred carry gun changes and about the time you make the switch you figure you ought to get a second copy of the new gun. The old carry wasn't bad, it's just not your favorite right now so you may figure to hold onto them (for now). Guns aren't getting any cheaper, after all.

I don't do the shotgun sports, and can't really hit much in the air with a shotgun, but I'm getting ready to buy a second pump 12g shotgun so that my son can graduate from Mom's 20g. I'm left handed, and prefer Mossberg over the 870. Despite the fact that my son is right handed and despite the glut of used 870s for reasonable prices, I'm thinking of getting a second Mossberg 500 so that the controls are all in the same places in case I want to use "his". His deer rifle is a Savage, so the tang mounted safety would be better for him (I'm not sure how I feel about the compensated barrels on the newer Mossbergs I would have already bough it).

Errh,

Why not?

Tob
October 5, 2012, 03:41 PM
If I ever need to use a weapon to protect myself or my family, I am counting on that weapon being "incarcerated" for an unlimited amount of time.

I want to have others of the same type which will take the missing gun's place until it returns.

doc2rn
October 5, 2012, 06:29 PM
I bought a used and well worn Winchester 30-30 from a pawn shop when I was eighteen, I use it for everything so I bought a new one for when this one wont run anymore because I cant see being without my do all rifle.

KevininPa
October 5, 2012, 07:46 PM
What he said. And sometimes if I'm flush and feel generous, my stepson will get a like model. That way, we all sort of match firearm/family wise. It made my daughter-in-law cry when I gave him a Speed Six. Her family is very dysfunctional and she's not used to "normal" family stuff.


*Was responding to #3. Forgot to hit quote button.

Lee Roder
October 5, 2012, 07:48 PM
Why multiples? Even if historical interest is lacking, when things go wrong, having multiples makes for easier troubleshooting.

:evil:

Tim the student
October 5, 2012, 08:05 PM
Some because I really like them, others because I like them and want to get them now before the price increases dramatically (as I'm certain it will for Garands when the CMP runs out).

TNboy
October 5, 2012, 08:26 PM
I have two Mosins, have you ever tried to row a boat with one oar?

Geckgo
October 6, 2012, 12:27 AM
Someone mentioned cars... I HAVE actually thought about getting a second 350Z since I race mine and I would like to have something nice to drive while the racecar is in the shop or if I have a breakdown at the track.

Everyone in my household loves the little HP22a and that's the one they grab for when we go to the range. Wouldn't mind getting 2 or 3 more of those, maybe two blues and another satin, plus they are cheap and I know how to repair them already when they start acting up.

monotonous_iterancy
October 6, 2012, 12:29 AM
Those are all good reasons. Although to be fair, I don't know of anyone who has two of the same exact model car. Same manufacturer maybe, but not the same model. Although guns aren't cars.

Warp
October 6, 2012, 12:58 AM
Those are all good reasons. Although to be fair, I don't know of anyone who has two of the same exact model car. Same manufacturer maybe, but not the same model. Although guns aren't cars.

If I could afford to buy it, and had a place to put it, and if a car was as maintenance free (when not in use) as a firearm...you bet your butt I'd have two of the same car. Probably different colors, though.

orionengnr
October 6, 2012, 01:09 AM
Awful lot of nice 1911s out there...and lots of variants in cartridge fired, frame size, frame material, etc..

Ditto for S&W revolvers.

And that only covers two of the many possible arguments...

jcwit
October 6, 2012, 02:55 AM
Why should I explain to anyone why I spend my money on anything?

Does it really bother some that much that I may own 2, or 3, or 4 or even 10 of a like model of whatever?

Oh well, I guess some will never be satisified.

berettaprofessor
October 6, 2012, 10:45 AM
I've only duplicated a couple of guns. Two Beretta 85's; one nickle-plated, beautiful, and kept for an almost safe queen, the other regularly used.

Of course, there are the 1911's...does it count if it's the same gun by different manufacturers?:neener:

Elkins45
October 6, 2012, 11:02 AM
I have three AR's, but they are wildly different as to stock, caliber and barrel length/contour. I have several 10/22's (some were gifts + inherited) and I don't think any two of them are exactly the same. One has a heavy barrel, one has a peep sight, one has a folding stock, etc.

The only guns I have that are exactly the same are two Kahr P9's and two Winchester model 37 shotguns. The P9 is a duplicate practice gun for my carry gun and the 37 is a duplicate of the old gun I inherited from my Dad that I don't want to risk damaging.

Jspy
October 6, 2012, 11:17 AM
Addiction ?

Warp
October 6, 2012, 06:05 PM
Why should I explain to anyone why I spend my money on anything?

Does it really bother some that much that I may own 2, or 3, or 4 or even 10 of a like model of whatever?

Oh well, I guess some will never be satisified.

People ask curious questions. I don't think it's worth getting worked up and defensive over, especially since nobody directly asked you to explain anything to them. ;)

Reloadron
October 6, 2012, 06:13 PM
I figure it this way. If one of something is really good then logically two of that same something has to be much better. That holds especially true of guns. It doesn't get any simpler. :)

Ron

Warp
October 6, 2012, 06:17 PM
I can see a guy wanting to know. The basic answer is:no practical reasons, really, but many personal, mostly non-rational reasons. Perfectly understandable when dealing with humans, especially as something as potentially emotional as guns.

There absolutely are practical reasons. I suggest reading through this thread. ;)

C0untZer0
October 6, 2012, 06:28 PM
The Rohrbaugh R9 is the perfect pocket pistol, it also makes a great backup gun. If you decide to carry a Rohrbaugh R9 for your primary, what could be better than to also carry one for a backup?

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=172996&stc=1&d=1349558876
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=172997&stc=1&d=1349558876

kimbernut
October 6, 2012, 06:30 PM
I'm with reloadron in dealing with anything good. Two is twice as good.

If two nails are sufficient four is stronger. If 24" OC meets code 16" OC is better.

Build to last, and backups are a good thing.

threefeathers
October 6, 2012, 07:35 PM
I put so many rounds through my carry guns in training I have two of each, HK P2K Glock 26, Smith J Frame

Mick_W
October 6, 2012, 07:39 PM
When all is said and done I will probably have about 8 12ga shotguns, 4 of which I know will be 870's, plus I will have 2 semi auto 12ga, a single shot, and a double barrel.

Plus I own several .45's with plans for 2 more and plans for a couple more .357's and a couple different .44mags.

rodregier
October 6, 2012, 07:55 PM
Spares. 2 is one, one is none...

TrueTexan
October 6, 2012, 09:02 PM
Have 686 3 inch and 6 inch averages out to a 686 with a 4.5 inch barrel. :)

PT92
October 6, 2012, 11:57 PM
Two reasons for me:

1) one to shoot "the crap out of K's, K's and more K's--the other is my CCW which I fire only enough to qualify with annually and ensure reliable ammo cycling

2) If one of my trap guns break, I have another for use or spare parts until the replacement part arrives

For me those are the facts Jack ;) (love that Bill Murray Line).

PT92
October 7, 2012, 12:04 AM
I can see a guy wanting to know. The basic answer is:no practical reasons, really, but many personal, mostly non-rational reasons. Perfectly understandable when dealing with humans, especially as something as potentially emotional as guns.
I respectfully disagree--What if one breaks, you could then either swap parts until replaced or just use it in the other's absence until the broken one gets fixed.

I just thought of theft as well (but I'm secure to the point of paranoia so I don't think that will happen though Murphy's Law is always at least potentially a possibility...

I do agree, however, in that there are people that just want four 500's or three P11's etc... just because (though in this economy the old "just because" seems to have applied more to our parents then us anymore :cuss:...

jcwit
October 7, 2012, 12:05 AM
People ask curious questions. I don't think it's worth getting worked up and defensive over, especially since nobody directly asked you to explain anything to them.


Anyone who thinks I'm "worked up" or "defensive" sure missed the mark.

The_Armed_Therapist
October 7, 2012, 10:39 AM
If you have multiple people, then it makes a lot of tactical sense to share equipment... mags, clips, ammo, parts, etc... There's a reason so many police and military forces require uniformity.

mavracer
October 7, 2012, 01:38 PM
To be perfectly honest I don't think I have any two that are exactly the same. I mean I have two 4 5/8" flattop 357 mag Blackhawks but one is a 1958 3 screw and the other is a 2005 50th anniversary model.

Ironman
October 7, 2012, 07:58 PM
Why not? Why do the super wealthy own more than one Ferarri? I know a guy that owns 3 and two are the same car just in different colors.

Hell I'm planning on buying a M9 and building it to match my suppressed 9FS Inox.

mf-dif
October 7, 2012, 08:03 PM
To Akibono duh.

CZ223
October 7, 2012, 10:53 PM
I have two LCP's
Two Glock 23's
Two Ruger Single six Vaqueros in 32 H&R mag
two Savage model 12 BVSS's in 223
two Savage model 12 BVSS's in 204 Ruger
Two Kimber Eclipse Pro's
Two Kimber ultras (one bluied one stainless)
Two Taurus PT1911's Duotones
Four other 1911's all similar
Four Ar-15's
Two Ak-s

I'm getting better. At one time I had 6 Glocks, 9 Savage model 12's and 10 pairs (20) Ruger Vaqueros as weel as a bunch of derringers and identical lever rifles, Model 97 shotguns etc.

Warp
October 7, 2012, 11:02 PM
I have two LCP's
Two Glock 23's
Two Ruger Single six Vaqueros in 32 H&R mag
two Savage model 12 BVSS's in 223
two Savage model 12 BVSS's in 204 Ruger
Two Kimber Eclipse Pro's
Two Kimber ultras (one bluied one stainless)
Two Taurus PT1911's Duotones
Four other 1911's all similar
Four Ar-15's
Two Ak-s

I'm getting better. At one time I had 6 Glocks, 9 Savage model 12's and 10 pairs (20) Ruger Vaqueros as weel as a bunch of derringers and identical lever rifles, Model 97 shotguns etc.

Well, yeah, okay...but there are 6 different calibers of Glocks sold in the US, two each for each bullet diameter they offer, as it happens. (9x19, .357 sig, .40, 10mm, .45 acp, .45 gap). And three main frame sizes + the long slide and tactical/practical offerings in some calibers.

In other words...6 Glocks could easily be 6 rather different guns.

What models were they?

Carl N. Brown
October 7, 2012, 11:28 PM
I have two 1960s Savage bolt action .22s same action different calibers-- a Model 73 .22 lr, conventional stock, that was my son's first gun, and a Model 63KM .22 mag, safety key lock, Mannlicher stock, that I bought because my sister gave me a cleaning kit, pistol case and a box of .22 magnum ammo for Christmas when I did not have a gun in .22 mag caliber and I did not say anything to her but thanked her. I then told my wife that now I was obligated to buy a .22 mag rifle. :) If you check with Numrich Arms Gun Parts, all replacement parts are the same on the Savage/Stevens 63/73 series except for the barrels and the stocks. (BTW on this model the factory orginal extractors all seem to break, but the replacement part extractors all seem to be properly heat treated.)

I have two Mosin Nagants -- a "sporterized" Type 53 carbine and an as-refurbished and issued 91/30 with octagon receiver. One intended for bad weather hunting, and one for vintage military matches, both as examples of their type--civilianized army rifle hunter, and military issue WWII battle rifle.

I have a CVA Bobcat .50 cal muzzleloader that I replaced the sights and used in black powder matches. That's the model WalMart sold for 69.95, and when they had one at the after-season 2006 sale for 29.95 I bought it for spare parts. The first is still in running condition twelve years later and the second was testfired, cleaned, and put back in the box Just In Case.

Why own more than one of the same? Sentimental reasons, one for keepsake one for practical use, historical reasons, spare parts or spare gun w/o cross training, slight differences for curio interest. Why not own more than one of the same?

luzyfuerza
October 8, 2012, 01:44 AM
Think about the value of what are you exchanging for these duplicate guns. Does anyone think that the dollar will buy more in 12 months than it does now? Steel and walnut is a better store of value than paper and ink.

Fast Frank
October 8, 2012, 02:15 AM
There's another reason for multiples, and so far nobody has mentioned it.

Variants.

I'm a pretty die-hard fan of the Marlin 39 lever action .22 rifle.

Currently, my financial situation allows me to own two of them. I have an iron sighted rifle made in 1950, and a scoped rifle made in 2002.

If I could afford it, I would certainly buy some more of the many variants that are out there.

See, the model 39 has been in production for a long, long time. (Annie Oakley used them in her gun shows, if that's a clue about just how long)

During that time, they have made them with long barrels, short barrels, octagon barrels, fat forestocks, slim forestocks, with checkering, without checkering, with safeties and rebounding hammers, with long magazine tubes, with short magazine tubes, with pistol grip stocks, with straight grip stocks, with medallions to commemorate things, and they have even put them in floating cases.

Are they all the same rifle? Yes. Are they different? Absolutely.

It's the sort of thing that a person who is "In To It" would instantly understand.

Wanting to collect something like that doesn't make a man weird, it makes him an enthusiast.

hang fire
October 8, 2012, 02:35 AM
Wife has a thing for the all steel 13 round mag Bersa Model 85, she presently has three, plus a Bersa model 23 .22 rf.

I asked her why she was buying up the M-85, she said they don't make them anymore, prices were right and value will only go up.

I hate it when she throws my words back in my face.

LtShortcut
October 8, 2012, 02:48 AM
Akimbo!

Doc3402
October 8, 2012, 06:52 AM
I have 3 S&W model 19's and a 66. They all get fired, they all get carried, and they all get regular cleaning and maintenance. None of them can be purchased new, and all of them are becoming more rare. Instead of asking me why, let me ask you why not?

12131
October 8, 2012, 04:55 PM
. Instead of asking me why, let me ask you why not?
Answer: Diversity!:evil:

silicosys4
October 8, 2012, 05:52 PM
Lol, no two guns are identical. They are at least 1 digit on the serial number off, and that makes each one unique and special to me !

Honestly though, I don't consider myself to be collecting "multiples" of the same gun, but I do have an interarms SS ppk, an interarms SS ppk/s, and an original walther wwII ppk. I also have three different 1911's, but they are pretty different from each other also.

Dr.Rob
October 8, 2012, 05:57 PM
Back up gun of same make and model for competition.

Guns break. You rarely know which part might go south. Same set up leaves you in the same division/class without having to DNF a match.

LeonCarr
October 8, 2012, 06:17 PM
I use the Noah's Ark Method of Firearms Purchasing.

I have two of every gun I might have to take to a fight. I have two ARs, two Remington 870s, and two Glocks set up exactly alike. If one goes down, is at the gunsmith for repair or customizing, or is disassembled for cleaning when the defecation hits the oscillation, I am prepared.

I have no problems with folks having multiples of the same model. I am in the process of having two identical hunting rifles and two identical backup guns too :).

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

morcey2
October 8, 2012, 06:27 PM
3 x M44s + 1 x M38 + 2 x M91/30....

Because 5 guys going through 1000 rounds of 7.62x54R with one gun takes _way_ too long.:D

Matt

If you enjoyed reading about "Why own more 1 of the same model?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!