Remington Core-Lokt Bullets


PDA






rayatphonix
October 7, 2012, 05:43 AM
I'm loading some 165 grain Core-Lokt for my 308. If I seat to the cannelure on the bullets I'm about 80/1000 under the COL recommendation in the manuals / sites I look at. The load I'm working on uses Varget and it's a very full case.

I ran a set of trial loads from the low end of the loading up near, but not at, the maximum loads and used the COL and ignored the cannelure and had no signs of overpressure. Groups were about 1" which isn't very good by this guns standard. Load didn't seem to matter.

If I seat the bullets to the cannelure would I see an increase in accuracy? An increase in pressure? This is the first time I've tried these bullets and the cannelure is higher on the bullets than I would expect. Should I just ignore the cannelure? I loaded for my bolt action, but also have a semi-auto in 308 where I would typically do a light crimp. Does that change the equation?

If you enjoyed reading about "Remington Core-Lokt Bullets" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
FROGO207
October 7, 2012, 07:56 AM
It could be the bullet quality as much as anything. Generally the more a bullet costs the more care in the manufacturing the more accurate it flies. That said I will use Core Lokt bullets where I can and like them. Some like the bullet just touching the lands and have to single load the bullets because they are too long for the MAG. Others want a long jump to the lands. Me I try several locations and use the best one for that particular rifle. I do not pay attention to the cannalure or bother to crimp unless it is a tube fed firearm or a revolver that needs to keep the bullet from moving. Some crimp everything but I have enough neck tension on my bullets that I can't see a difference and will skip a (in my mind) non necessary step when possible. YMMV

Walkalong
October 7, 2012, 09:13 PM
The COL where ever you are looking is wrong if it doesn't put the cannelure at the case mouth. Seat the Core-Lokt with a moderate roll crimp into the cannelure (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=126790&stc=1&d=1283098860) and see how it shoots.

They are not match bullets, but usually shoot pretty well. If it doesn't shoot well enough to suit you when loaded to the cannelure, try another bullet.

Groups were about 1" Which is just fine for game.

NCsmitty
October 8, 2012, 12:07 AM
Most magazine's designed to handle 308, 7mm-08 and others based on that length case, require a Maximum COAL to be 2.80 to fit. Your issue may be using two different style actions which may need different loadings for best accuracy in each rifle. As mentioned, the semi-auto may benefit from a crimp in the cannelure, so try the loads and see if a compromise can be reached, and if not, then you'll need separate loads worked up.


NCsmitty

GP100man
October 8, 2012, 12:30 AM
I use em almost with every rifle & feel there the most under rated rifle bullet that`s made !

I almost always get better groupin with a slight to moderste crimp.

rayatphonix
October 8, 2012, 09:30 AM
Thanks for the advice. I'll seat the bullet a little deeper. I bought these bullets to hunt with and agree that 1" groups are fine for hunting, but I also think they can do better. I haven't tried any loads through my semi-auto yet. I've found it's easier for me to find the best load for my bolt gun and use that as a starting point for my semi-auto. I neck size only for my bolt guns so I keep the ammo for the two separate and don't mind having different loads.

SSN Vet
October 9, 2012, 03:22 PM
I recently had the exact same issue with the 150 gr. Core Lokt bullet I'm using for my .30-30 loads.

Turns out the Remington bullet desing has the canalure farther forward on the bullet than either the 150 gr. Win or Sierra bullets I have.

Since the load I wanted to try was close to Lee's published max, I loaded a few with the canalure seated beyond the mouth and the COAL matching the min. COAL published in my manual. Then I inspected the brass for signs of over pressure to see how close to the limit I actually was. Then, since the load hadn't cratered or totally flattened any primers, I loaded the next test batch to the canalure. These performed just fine and again there was no sign of overpresure.

Fair warning, visual indications of over preasure is not an exact science, so be carefull.

rayatphonix
October 9, 2012, 06:39 PM
SSN, Did you see an increase in accuracy when you seated down to the cannelure?

ranger335v
October 9, 2012, 07:56 PM
No one can tell anyone what a change in seating depth, powder charge, primer, bullet type, etc, will do to accuracy.

Seating to a canalure only matters if you're going to crimp the bullets.

Manual OAL is what was used to develop the data in their rifle, your's is different so their OAL means little to you.

TwoEyedJack
October 9, 2012, 10:00 PM
I load 130 gr. Corelokts in my .270 and ignore the cannelure. My magazine and throat allow me to load really long. I get sub-MOA accuracy in a Rem 700, almost as good as ballistic tips. Great performance on deer too. The last one I shot with this bullet was only about 40 yards away, which is where you are most likely to see a bullet blow up and fail if it is prone to that, and the shot went all the way through the rib cage and exited. The deer was DRT.

GooseGestapo
October 10, 2012, 07:39 AM
I concur with what some of the others have said.
The Remington CorLokts are outstanding game bullets, but are not the first choice for accuracy.
The problem with Corlokts and accuracy is that the quality is highly variable.
I've currently got some .308" 180gr PtSpt's that are superlative accurate from a Colt Lt.Rifle in .30/06 and most accurate bullet I've tried through a Savage M110 in .300RUM. However, I've had some that were obviously "rejects" for factory ammo use and were "dumped" as reloading components.... Some .30/30 150gr RN with a "hollow point" from where the ejector pin on the forming die punched them out.... but, they shot well and killed deer just as dead as "perfect" bullets.... Just looked peculiar....

For accuracy, they aren't my first or second, or third choice for. That would be Sierra, period. Nosler's are "good", but too expensive for "shooting". Hunting, OK, but for high volumn, give me a Varmint Extream, or Nightmare "cheap", bulk bullet.. I've had the same "variablility" in the Hornady 55gr Spt w/cannulure "bulk" bullets. One batch shot sub 1/2moa from two .223's I had. The next two lot's were 1.5moa, and 2.0moa respectively.... I don't shoot cannulured .22cf bullets any more.... And Sierra don't make any, either...

Corlokts used to be the least expensive bullet available. However, since the "Freedom" group took over Remington (and others) circa 2008, the Corlokts are now more expensive than Sierra's, Speer's, and Hornady's.... So, I haven't bought any in over 4yrs.....
One inch at 100yds ain't bad for a Corlokt.... If you want better, substitute a Sierra "ProHunter" or "MatchKing".... either seated to touch the rifling, or 1-bore diameter (ie:.300" for .30cal) of bore-riding surface of bullet in the neck of the case....
One or the other almost always will give best accuracy with conventional cup and core bullets...

SSN Vet
October 10, 2012, 09:54 AM
SSN, Did you see an increase in accuracy when you seated down to the cannelure?

I haven't been able to test them properly yet...

So far, I've only fired enough of them to veryify that they are safe in my Marlin 336.

rayatphonix
October 10, 2012, 10:03 AM
Goose, it sounds like I'm getting most of the accuracy I can expect. I've had these bullets for some time and figured I ought to use them at the range. I bought them a while back because, as you said, they were cheap and they are a good hunting bullet.

In a big year I might go deer hunting 3 or 4 times and take about as many shots at deer so cost isn't an issue. I get much better groups with Nosler and have settled on those for hunting. I use Sierra bullets for my 25-06 as for whatever reason, they perform best in that rifle.

So it seems I ought to enjoy my time at the range with the Core-Lokt and stop worrying about the groups. Thanks to all.

Mykey
October 10, 2012, 05:21 PM
No one can tell anyone what a change in seating depth, powder charge, primer, bullet type, etc, will do to accuracy.

Seating to a canalure only matters if you're going to crimp the bullets.

Manual OAL is what was used to develop the data in their rifle, your's is different so their OAL means little to you.


100% Correct!

If you enjoyed reading about "Remington Core-Lokt Bullets" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!