Lyman Turbo Sonic 6000


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noylj
October 8, 2012, 01:00 AM
Just got a Turbo Sonic 6000. I had been playing with cleaning cases in my wife's old ultrasonic unit and decided, when the TS6000 was on sale at Natchez, to get one. Thinking about using it for cleaning slides and frames, but decided to start with some cases.
1) Holds 6.3 quarts.
2) Plastic basket goes almost all the way down the tub to the bottom, so the case capacity is quite high.
3) As with all US units, the more cases, the longer the cleaning time
4) Wife's old jewelry unit would clean a basket of cases (about 100-200, depending on case size) in about 30 minutes.
5) TS6000 cleans the same number of cases in about 10-15 minutes.
6) Getting the last bit of ash/debris out of primer pocket takes longer
7) The unit has a drain on the side, but the supplied tube isn't quite long enough. Need to find a tub/pail to hold the still-usable cleaning solution and something to place the pail on to reach the too-short tube. Imagine NOT closing the valve and pouring your cleaning solution into the tub and all over the table/floor.
8) This level of cleaning is NOT needed, but, if I have a unit any way, might as well keep things interesting
9) Wish there was a sink/wash-tub in the garage. It is a pain to haul 6 quarts of water from the house. Also, taking the cases into the be rinsed off.
10) The smaller jewelry unit would heat the water up to 160F or so in about 10 minutes. This unit, due to size (and maybe not also having a larger heating unit) will take about 1.5 hours to heat up. Based on this, it is best to just start with HOT water, 'cause in the home, I'm not waiting that long. It does, however, get up to 130-140F fairly quickly.
11) Lyman and RCBS cleaning solutions come "concentrated" with a 1:20 mix ratio for most uses. For this unit, with 6 quarts of water, you need to add 150ml of cleaning solution. 946ml (32 oz) bottles are $20. Thus, you can get 6 "light duty" mixed cleaning solutions from the bottle. Not bad, but a 1:40 should be easily achievable by using less water in the "concentrates" the companies are offering.
12) A teaspoon of liquid Dawn and 1-2 tablespoons of Lemi-Shine is almost as good.
13) I have often, in the past, simply removed cases from the US unit and let them drip-dry. Came out looking just fine (not looking for shine, just don't want discolor/corrosion). Also, I have rinsed case and let them drip-dry and they came out looking just the same as the non-rinsed cases. After several months, they all still look just fine.
14) It still takes more time and effort than simply 30-minutes in 20/40 corn, and I doubt there is any benefit (other than "fun"). I would certainly not have bought the unit ONLY for case cleaning.
15) Am wondering what sort of glass container I can find that will hold barrel, slide, and frame so I can clean in Hoppe's #9 rather than aqueous steel cleaning solution. I have been using a glass pickle jar to put semi-auto handgun barrels in with the old jewelry unit. 10-30 minutes REALLY gets the crude out of the barrel.

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john16443
October 9, 2012, 10:32 AM
I took that same plunge earlier this year, bought the Hornady Magnum cleaner. Slightly smaller (3 liter) capacity than the Lyman, but works real well. I have many of the same observations and comments as you do, and can add a little more information to hopefully assist you.

If you're going to clean gun parts, be sure to get the parts cleaning solutions. They are different than the case cleaning solutions.

Only add enough solution to cover the cases you're cleaning. This will allow better cleaning action than trying to vibrate all 6 quarts of fluid. I really notice this difference in cleaning effectiveness.

Getting the primer pockets clean can be accomplished by stirring the cases around in the basket during the 30 minutes of cleaning time. I take a wooden dowel and stir them around during my cleaning cycles. Also lifting the basket in and out of the solution a few times seems to help. Using less solution as noted above also really helps.

Save the trip to the sink with the 6 quarts of water, What I do is lift the basket out of the cleaner, allow as much of the solution to drain back to the cleaner, and dump the brass into a tray. I take the tray inside and use it to rinse the brass in the laundry room sink. Using your corn cob separating tray would do the same thing.

The Hornady also is a little slower to heat up if running just the heater. If you want it hotter sooner, turn on the heater and transducers about 5-10 minutes before adding the brass, then run your 30 minute cycle. I don't recommend heating the solution in the microwave, don't mix reloading stuff with food prep stuff.

I think there is a clear benefit to ultrasonic cleaning compared to corn cob/walnut that is generally overlooked or not considered. Namely, you now no longer have all of that primer dust hanging around in the air. Other than what you may expose yourself to during the depriming process you now have all those lead compounds from the primers contained in the water solution, not in the air. I deprime on my Hornady LNL AP with a universal decapping die. The Hornady has what I call a closed depriming system, no dust exposure. When I deprimed on my Lee press, I was always left with a small pile of spent primer compound around the base of the ram. That lead containing pile of material could get anywhere.

Why don't you use your existing jars for cleaning your gun parts in the Lyman? Fill them with the steel cleaning solution, and fill the rest of the cleaner with plain water to a level just below the mouth of the jar. The solution inside the jar is what will do the cleaning. The water on the outside of the jar will still transmit the sound energy to the parts. If necessary, clean for 15-20 minutes, and then turn the part over in the jar to clean for another 15-20 minutes.

You are correct about the Dawn/Lemishine effectiveness. Go ahead and put the LemiShine in with the Lyman cleaner as well, you'll be amazed!

noylj
October 10, 2012, 02:21 AM
Thank you.

If you're going to clean gun parts, be sure to get the parts cleaning solutions. They are different than the case cleaning solutions.
Got that, plus I would still rather clean in Hoppes #9 than water.

Only add enough solution to cover the cases you're cleaning. This will allow better cleaning action than trying to vibrate all 6 quarts of fluid. I really notice this difference in cleaning effectiveness.
Thanks. Didn't mention that. As I said, the basket in this unit goes much closer to the bottom of the tank than I have seen in any other US unit I have used.

Getting the primer pockets clean can be accomplished by stirring the cases around in the basket during the 30 minutes of cleaning time. I take a wooden dowel and stir them around during my cleaning cycles. Also lifting the basket in and out of the solution a few times seems to help. Using less solution as noted above also really helps.
I am not going to do more than "put cases in -- take cases out." As I said, I'm just playing and got it for gun cleaning.

Save the trip to the sink with the 6 quarts of water, What I do is lift the basket out of the cleaner, allow as much of the solution to drain back to the cleaner, and dump the brass into a tray. I take the tray inside and use it to rinse the brass in the laundry room sink. Using your corn cob separating tray would do the same thing.
I would never even think of taking the 6 quarts of water to the sink. Just wish I had a sink in the garage so I wouldn't be carrying wet cases around to the kitchen with a sink big enough to actually rinse off all the cases at once. Bathroom sinks seem to be made for looks and usability.
The cleaner has a too-short drain hose, but I got it because it does have a drain. Now I need to get a plastic jug to drain the cleaning solution into.

The Hornady also is a little slower to heat up if running just the heater. If you want it hotter sooner, turn on the heater and transducers about 5-10 minutes before adding the brass, then run your 30 minute cycle. I don't recommend heating the solution in the microwave, don't mix reloading stuff with food prep stuff.
Sorry, takes 1.5 hours to heat up. Best I can do is bring hot water to it and let it maintain temp.

Why don't you use your existing jars for cleaning your gun parts in the Lyman? Fill them with the steel cleaning solution, and fill the rest of the cleaner with plain water to a level just below the mouth of the jar. The solution inside the jar is what will do the cleaning. The water on the outside of the jar will still transmit the sound energy to the parts. If necessary, clean for 15-20 minutes, and then turn the part over in the jar to clean for another 15-20 minutes.
This is what I have always done with gun barrels. Glass seems best. All you need is "enough" contact with the tank. I usually have about 1" of the 6-8" tall glass jar in the ultrasonic tank. Now, though, I want something so I can lay frames and slides out flat in a wide but thin container with a lid containing Hoppes #9. If I put the parts in the steel cleaning solution, it is simpler just to put the parts in the plastic tray directly in the tank with the steel cleaning solution. Just hate metal in water.
They say to just let the steel parts drip dry and then they mention that the solution, and I can't remember the exact term used, was of limited use for rust prevention. I don't want my parts to drip dry if crevices can dry slow and possibly rust. Much prefer that the cleaning solution was a natural rust-preventative where only oil is left behind. Now, if I had commercial IPA or Acetone dip tanks to "rinse" them off...

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