Military asault packs


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Renegade Ziggy
October 13, 2012, 01:34 AM
In the market for a military assault pack for hunting or BOB. Found a Condor Molle 3 day assault pack but haven't found any reviews online, any vets out there that used this pack while across the pond?

I'm not looking for any old backpack that school kids use, I'm looking for a military style pack that can stand up to a lot of abuse and weight.

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Shadow 7D
October 13, 2012, 01:47 AM
it's a back pack
find the one that works best for you

mljdeckard
October 13, 2012, 02:03 AM
Yeah, honestly, I find that the more I complicate and specialize, the less it helps me when I think it will. Keep it simple. They truth is, I intend on keeping and paying for my assault pack that came with the infantryman's kit. I think they retail for about $90. I do find myself drooling over the big Camelbak packs, but that's really more for a cool carry-on that holds the laptop than for mission use.

Renegade Ziggy
October 13, 2012, 02:27 AM
it's a back pack
find the one that works best for you

I'm not carrying school books to 10th grade English class. I'm looking for a pack that I can carry essential survival equipment in, a backpack that won't rip apart after 2 weeks of use. The point of asking people on here is so I won't have to waste money and time in trying out a hundred different packs, I value people on THR input. Which leads me to my next question, why reply to my thread when you don't have any to contribute?

ZDriver96
October 13, 2012, 08:36 AM
I'm no expert on packs but i purchased the riflemans pack and am very happy with it. Here is a link to where they sell packs at a very low cost: http://tonystactical.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=4

If your looking for a bug out bag I think these are great and very inexpensive. The riflemans pack is an external frame pack. It has 4 different generations of external frames. Gen 1 & 2 are junk. Gen 3 is ok. Gen 4 is completely redesigned and very durable. The ones in the link are Gen 4. The frame contours your back well and makes it comfortable to carry. I find that it holds a lot and has plenty of molle attachments to customize it. Its definitely a high quality pack and would make a good BOB. For the price I don't think it can be beat.

But the seller in the link I provided sells other packs as well. The others may work better for you?

rbernie
October 13, 2012, 10:01 AM
Which leads me to my next question, why reply to my thread when you don't have any to contribute?They did contribute - they gave you their opinion on the subject. You just didn't like their inputs.

What is your price range? There have been several 'tactical pack' threads here in the last year or so, and they might be worth searching thru. I know that the moderator 'taliv' has posted some extensive reviews.

dprice3844444
October 13, 2012, 12:12 PM
i use a west german special forces alpine ruck that was built by an outfit in germany called deuter.they have been building mail carrier bags since the late 1800's,so they know how to build ruck straps,you will see a metal hang tag with (original tauren sack)on it.my buddy,vietnam era 10th sfg group discoverd these while training with the germans at bad tolz.he grabs them when he finds them because folks don't know what they are.they have a large leather flap that goes over the top.metal buckles

DesertFox
October 13, 2012, 12:48 PM
CamelBak H.A.W.G. Max Gear in desert camo has treated me very well in many situations. Features like antenna ports and modular mouthpiece are real winners.

For larger, hunting applications, the CamelBak Commander has suited me well.

rbernie
October 13, 2012, 01:01 PM
From earlier this year:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=643684
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=667177
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=654789
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=659611
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=654002
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=612910

walking arsenal
October 13, 2012, 01:33 PM
Maxpedition condor or anything else made by them.

leadcounsel
October 13, 2012, 02:22 PM
I don't care for the assault packs. Carried one regularly on many deployments and training. Only 2 pockets (main, and small). Not designed well. Topheavy on fabric if you will. And they just aren't that comfortable.

It could be so much better with daisy loops, side pockets, water bottle pouch, etc. It is a subpar 3 day pack.

There are many many better choices out there.

blarby
October 13, 2012, 02:55 PM
Well, I get a lot of use out of my packs.

Not combat use- but considerably more than 10th grade english books.

A mid-size camelbak is a fantastic choice. Most of the designs that hold a 3L water pouch ( I have several) combine enough accessory room for , in my experience :



3l of water.
a jetboil stove.
3 days worth of food for myself and my wife.
A combination Gerber camp saw.
2 LED flashlights.
My 3 piece skinning knife set.
An eating utensils set.
Space for a small handgun of your choice
Space for 100 rounds of pistol ammunition.
Space for 50 rounds of rifle ammunition.


In addition, they have load adjustment straps, additional durable exterior pockets, and are incredibly lightweight.

We each carry one of these packs, and the ammunition loadouts change per trip- but their utility and durability is such that I keep buying new ones when I need new packs- and I have 5 of them now.

I'm the hardest person on gear that I know of. If you want a durability test on something, give it to me for 6 months- I'll give you back your pieces, or tell you its good to go. Thats not something i'm overly proud of, it just happens to be a fact. These bags.... I have yet to "break" one. I have lost one.

Onward Allusion
October 13, 2012, 03:38 PM
Check this out -

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0051E7E36

It's comparable to the Mapedition version that cost twice as much.

Renegade Ziggy
October 13, 2012, 03:39 PM
They did contribute - they gave you their opinion on the subject. You just didn't like their inputs.

If I recall the rules say be informative, not opinionated. Not trying to fight, just saying. Thanks for all the great info everyone. I'm leaning more towards Camelbak now. I'll definitely have to check them out.

Charles S
October 13, 2012, 03:41 PM
Quote:
Which leads me to my next question, why reply to my thread when you don't have any to contribute?
They did contribute - they gave you their opinion on the subject. You just didn't like their inputs.

In my humble opinion if your opinion does not contribute in a meaningful way to the conversation, then keep it to yourself. The contribution did nothing to further the discussion... as is the case all to often lately on TheHighroad. We are on the high road and should strive to be better than the general public.... Oh well

I really like Badlands packs..

http://badlandspacks.com/packs.php?sort=capacity

Although the Kelty Military packs are great and I carry Kelty more than any other pack.

http://www.kelty.com/c-backpacks.aspx#intended-use=hunting

Unfortunately the Kelty I like the very best is no longer made. Mine is well made with multiple pockets and options a sternal strap, binoculars holders on the straps, an integral blaze orange rain cover.... very expandable. The best pack I have ever used. Good luck..

I do think hunting packs are thought out better than assault packs and are generally more adaptable to other uses.

blarby
October 13, 2012, 03:44 PM
I have two of these :

http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-Lobo-Hydration-Pack-Black/dp/B00437TWVE/ref=sr_1_5?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1350157354&sr=1-5&keywords=camelbak+3l

and one of these :

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dsporting&field-keywords=camelbak+rim+runner

My other 2 are the expo models- 1l, more for a short bike ride.

The rim runner is my personal fav- its got room for all of the above, and then some.

If I were in the market for a pack, and had none, I would get a rim-runner camelbak.

Its got 5 zippered sections other than the water pouch for storing gear, two huge external pouches ( the gerber saw is in the one shown) Load straps, an air deflector so your back doesn't get wet, and its padded which is fantastic when its full of gear, and you have to schlep it up a 19 degree incline on a hot day. The water pouch can also double as a ration holder, as long as you dont put anything back there that can pierce the bladder- which is removable, easy to clean, and baffled- so your water does not slosh back and forth. 3l of sloshing water can make you more tipsy than you would think !

1-1 Banger
October 13, 2012, 06:52 PM
I've taken to using a plain Jane pack from S.O.C lately, 2 fairly large pockets for important stuff that I actually need, a very small pocket that I keep extra gloves and eye pro in, and a kind of medium pocket that honestly is usually just filled with Monsters and Rip-Its, haha.:o Good 3 day pack though.
My buddy is our team's RTO(scout platoons have each 6 man team carrying a radio) and he's been using a $30 Mil-Tec(kind of a Maxpedition knock off) as his radio bag for a good minute now. The back is seperated lengthwise into two tall, skinny pockets. The one against the back of the pack is used only for his ASIP radio, extra antennas and batteries. The other for his personal stuff. The two pockets on the front are filled with extra batteries for non radio stuff, a DAGR GPS, an SKL, gloves, MREs, Rip-Its, etc.

TAKtical
October 13, 2012, 07:20 PM
I use this one- http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/MOLLE-981
Its a really nice pack. Very comfortable. Stitching is really good. Ive walked 25 miles a week since march with this pack carrying 40lbs.

taliv
October 13, 2012, 08:07 PM
"tactical / military" packs to me mean covered in molle and heavy canvas so it doesn't fall apart when carrying radios batteries and ammo.

You can go to just about any camping store and get a high quality durable and much lighter weight pack. It just won't carry as heavy a load

hso
October 13, 2012, 09:41 PM
military assault pack for hunting or BOB

They're not well suited to either use, they just look kewl.

Modern backpacks built for your purpose will be lighter, more comfortable and serve better than some overweight "operator" gear.

Walkalong
October 13, 2012, 10:59 PM
The array of packs out there is mind boggling. I would love for folks to say why they prefer this or that pack, not just say it's great.

Renegade Ziggy
October 13, 2012, 11:20 PM
Thanks for all the great info everyone, I noticed that a lot of you would rather lean more towards a basic pack, after a lot of thought It would be more practical if I did the same. Camelbak seems to be a good choice, a little pricey but I suppose it'll be worth it in the long run. Thanks again!

really like Badlands packs..

http://badlandspacks.com/packs.php?sort=capacity

Thanks for the introduction to Badlands, their gear is sick man.

Onward Allusion
October 13, 2012, 11:21 PM
Yes, non-assault style packs are definitely lighter and more flexible in design with possibly more internal pockets. However, one thing to keep in mind about commercial "non-assault" style backpacks is that they usually have reflective material on them. For this reason alone, my get-home bags in my car are the heavier duty non-reflective types. Nothing says "here I am" faster than reflective material meant for safety.

walking arsenal
October 14, 2012, 12:26 AM
I suggested Maxpedition gear because it is extremely durable, water resistant, and most of their gear comes in neutral non-camo colors. Their bags are often Molle compatible but mostly just look like your everyday pack. They are comfortable as well, with all the right load bearing straps.

My wife uses a condor an a thermite waist pack. I have a Pygmy falcon II that I use daily for hauling my text books at college, a fatboy versipack, and two of their ratpack wallets.
I can't recommend them enough.

MrCleanOK
October 14, 2012, 11:51 AM
I think you have the right idea to look into getting a "normal" pack. There is a difference between a $30 book bag and a day pack. There have been a couple threads in the past few days from guys looking for military packs. The problem with military packs is that they are way, way behind the curve when compared to what is commercially available. You can usually count on them being well made (strong stitching), but they are very poorly designed. Though sturdy, military packs are heavy, uncomfortable, and poorly featured.

MrCleanOK
October 14, 2012, 11:57 AM
one thing to keep in mind about commercial "non-assault" style backpacks is that they usually have reflective material on them

It is common to find reflective material on smaller packs that are marketed to mountain bikers, cyclists, etc. Not many packs marketed exclusively for hikers have reflective materials. For every hiker out there that wants a high visibility safety colored pack, there are probably twice as many that want a more subdued pack. Many packs will have different color options available to please both crowds, with neither pack featuring reflective material because it is not compatible with both designs.

taliv
October 14, 2012, 07:11 PM
Though sturdy, military packs are heavy, uncomfortable, and poorly featured.

maybe from 30 years ago. (or the cheap crappy ones you find in gun stores and gun shows)

you can get good ones that are comfortable and well thought out, though they are still heavy.

believe me. we've had guys humping around afghanistan, funded by our ridiculous military budget, for over 10 years. they're not cheap, but you CAN buy military style packs that are on par or better than the traditional camping stuff.

if you need to put a rifle in the pack, look at eberlestock. if you don't, then look at mystery ranch. both are very well regarded.

i have posted plenty of pics of my backpacks in the past. can post more if necessary

jmorris
October 14, 2012, 09:12 PM
I'm not looking for any old backpack that school kids use, I'm looking for a military style pack that can stand up to a lot of abuse and weight. I still have the one I used in college to cart books around. It has never seen as much weight as it did before I recieved my diploma.

MrCleanOK
October 14, 2012, 11:46 PM
Taliv, as someone who has to hump one of those packs, I would disagree. While the current Molle packs are miles ahead of the old Alice packs, they are still lacking when compared against commercially available packs. I think the Marines' ILBE packs look promising, but I don't have any hands on experience with them. Maybe I am not cool enough to get issued the really nice stuff, but I will stand behind all of my comments regarding the issued-to-everyone-in-the-army packs.

Specific problems I see with the Molle large ruck:
- Narrow range of size adjustment. It's too short for taller soldiers to wear properly.
- The hip belt is thinly padded, and the pad is too short to cover the hip bones adequately.
- Huge voluminous bag, handles loads poorly if they are too big for the assault bag, but too small to fill the ruck.

And with the assault bag:
- It's way heavy for a day pack.
- The plastic frame sheets in them rarely fit, and the foam pad sheets break down over time.
- The bag is too small, and if you try to extend the capacity by attaching the butt pack, it just flops around off the back.
- The pockets aren't designed to organize all of the small things that routinely get put in a day pack.

There is a new medium ruck that splits the difference between the large ruck and assault bag, but I haven't had a chance to wring mine out yet.

FWIW, I have been using a Camelbak Motherlode in place of the assault bag for the past couple years.

FrankCastleThePunisher
October 15, 2012, 12:43 AM
I bought the Condor molle backpack and is a very good bag for the money, and holds plenty of stuff. Straps are comfortable. Zippers are good and plenty of pockets. For the money it is hard to beat. I think I gave around $99.00 for mind. The Maxpedition bags will be more expensive, but they are good bags also.

redbone
October 15, 2012, 07:32 AM
I have used a 5.11 Rush 72 for several years now. The first year I drug it around the desert, lots of rough handling, and its a champ. Heavy, yes. Pricey, oh yeah. I find it comfortable to hike with, and itp carries a heavy load well. Designed for a water bladder if you want to use one. I like the two outside pockets on the sides, which will hold one liter nalgenes. The internal frame is based around two sturdy aluminum staves and a sheet of fairly rigid plastic. The suspension is great if you are carrying heavy stuff like water, ammo, a radio, etc.

Shadow 7D
October 15, 2012, 07:47 AM
So, as you can see there are many options
find what works for you, I find that a simple book bag is more than enough for a light day trip and I tend to prefer LIGHT backpacking packs, the tend to be well set up for your stuff.

taliv
October 15, 2012, 08:26 AM
Mrclean. I am definitely not talking about military issue packs.

Have you carried a mystery ranch pack?

I haven't seen a hip belt on any hiking pack that is larger or more padded than the hip belts on my two eberlestocks

MrCleanOK
October 15, 2012, 10:25 AM
Unfortunately, I haven't had the pleasure. I do have a Dana Designs pack from about the time Mr. Gleason started Mystery Ranch. It's a bombproof pack, but after looking at what is available from MR today, his current stuff is a little more sophisticated.

OpticsPlanet
October 15, 2012, 02:04 PM
Another vote for the 5.11 Rush Series. I have a Rush 24 that is holding up very well.

http://images1.opticsplanet.com/120-120-ffffff/opplanet-511-backpack-rush12-56892-328.png
http://www.opticsplanet.com/s/5%252E11+rush/

5.11 also makes a line of packs called "Covrt" (yes, spelled like that):

http://images1.opticsplanet.com/120-120-ffffff/opplanet-511-backpack-56961-726.png
http://www.opticsplanet.com/5-11-tactical-covrt-18-backpack.html

The Covrt line is made just as beefy as the Rush series, but looks less out of place in an urban environment. It won't match your cammies, but if you want to look like just another college kid or tourist, it works very well. Hide in plain sight and all that.

Mark H.

OpticsPlanet
October 15, 2012, 02:09 PM
+1 on the COVRT 18!

Here is a review I did on mine a few months ago. The pack is still holding strong!

http://blog.tacticalstore.com/2012/08/covrt-18-backpack.html

Chase B.

fireflyfather
October 16, 2012, 10:30 PM
http://www.maxpedition.com/store/pc/FALCON-II-BACKPACK-12p110.htm

Cheaper here:
http://www.amazon.com/Maxpedition-0513K-Falcon-Ii-Backpack-Khaki/dp/B001DRJGKY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350440712&sr=8-1&keywords=falcon+II+backpack

I've been using this for over a year for everything from schoolbooks to 11 mile hikes in the mountains/desert in June (2-3 gallons of water + other gear).

Holds a 3 liter camelback, plus 3 field stripped MREs and minor gear without even using the main compartment. Molle everywhere. I added 2 of these (1 on each side) for carrying 2 extra litres of water in Nalgene bottles, plus a few basic first aid items (QuickClot in one, mini-survival kit in other).

http://www.combatsportsupply.com/condoroutdoormolleh20waterbottlepouch.aspx

Holds up well to high weight and reinforced bottom with gromets for drainage. VERY comfortable, wicks away sweat, good belt strap, quality zippers, etc...

Worth every penny.

walking arsenal
October 16, 2012, 10:42 PM
Second! ^

I've got it's sibling, the pygmy falcon II.

TimboKhan
October 16, 2012, 11:57 PM
I have used a 5.11 Rush 24 for probably two years now, and it remains about all I could want in a pack.

Excellent build quality, ample room. I am a big dude and it carries comfortably as well. What really puts it over the top for me is the organization. Excellent and thus far durable zippable webbing inside the main pack, sufficient molls attachment points, enough outer pockets to be handy but not in the way. Also, it's water bladder ready.

I have used it as a travel bag, a hunting ruck, a GP bag and as a "tactical" bag, and it has yet to annoy me. I like it so much I want another, in fact! The 24 is really too big for a daily bag, but I have used it for that too.

The only other bag that gets consistent use from me is a new army mole in woodland that a buddy sold me dirt cheap. I don't hate it, but it doesn't hold enough gear to my way of thinking. Because it holds less than my rush 24, it is basically my daily bag and in that regard it works just fine,

RatDrall
October 19, 2012, 08:49 AM
Found a Condor Molle 3 day assault pack but haven't found any reviews online, any vets out there that used this pack while across the pond?


I doubt any vet' would have used a Condor bag, it's not as strong as a pack should be and most wouldn't rely on such a bag where it counts.

Buy the equivelant model from Maxpedition - it's better built, reinforced, double stitched, etc. and has a great warranty. If you can afford better, step up to Camelbak's military line for a nice US made backpack for under $200.

They're not well suited to either use, they just look kewl.

Modern backpacks built for your purpose will be lighter, more comfortable and serve better than some overweight "operator" gear.

Respectfully, I disagree.

"Operator Gear" is over built so that it won't rip open and fail when needed, spilling all of your other important gear on the ground. I have a Maxpedition Pygmy Falcon that's been heavily used (every hike) for the last 4 years and hardly has a loose stitch.

Light dayhiker gear is just that, light gear made to last at least a day.

There are military grade packs that don't scream "army bag". My favorite is Camelbak's Linchpin. It has no molle webbing, but is made from Cordura nylon and is incredibly functional.

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