CZ question for those with a little experience


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MTMilitiaman
October 13, 2012, 11:12 AM
I am currently considering a couple different CZ models. The one objection I've heard brought against the design that seems to warrant some consideration is that the positioning of the slide inside the frame lessens the amount of exposed slide enough to make it difficult or cumbersome to slingshot the slide. I wanted to know if anyone who has put a CZ through its paces has had problems working the slide?

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beatledog7
October 13, 2012, 12:06 PM
It's a simple training matter. I have two CZ-75s and a CZ "clone" with this design, and it took about five minutes to get used to them.

My Baby Eagle was the hardest to get used to, as its slide profile is even lower lower than the CZs, providing less real estate on which to achieve purchase. But again, it's a matter of training oneself.

nebeel
October 13, 2012, 12:27 PM
I wouldn't say that it's necessarily "harder" as much as you just need to get more used to it.

With an outside slide design like the 1911, Sig, etc... you can grab the slide almost with the rear sights touching your palm. With a CZ or clone, you need to use mostly your thumb and index finger to pull the slide. I imagine that if hand strength is an issue, then a CZ slide could be more of an issue.

The Lone Haranguer
October 13, 2012, 12:33 PM
There is a grain of truth to it, but you quickly become acclimated. I don't have any trouble. I don't find the front serrations on the PCR (my personal gun) or the P-01 to be of any use.

wbwanzer
October 13, 2012, 02:51 PM
I've had two CZs and currently have two Witnesses and I've honestly never even thought about it. Non issue for me.

armoredman
October 13, 2012, 02:59 PM
No, in ten CZ pistols and at least 7 Witness pistols, never had a problem.

BCRider
October 13, 2012, 03:02 PM
I had my CZ's before I got my first 1911. I guess since I started with the CZ I learned to slingshot it fine and just carryied on with the 1911 with using a minimal slide grip style. I still have no issue either way. Although I use my CZ's for action matches. So far I have not with the 1911.

In my case my reloads tilt the gun slightly outward to allow an easier mag insertion and after the heel of my hand thumps the mag into lock my hand simply continues up to the slide and I "overhand" it with the slide pinched between my four fingers and heel of my hand. It's far faster and more sure than pivoting the gun to let me use my thumb and forefinger.

papaairbear
October 13, 2012, 03:08 PM
That is a non-issue with me as well. I use my left thumb and forefinger to slingshot the slide anyway. I read somewhere thar Europeans seldom use a slide release, so the releases are not made to easily release the slide-- never had an issue with that either.

jmr40
October 13, 2012, 04:06 PM
That is one of many reasons I no longer own a CZ. That and the tiny ejection port add up to a gun that is far more difficult to clear jams and to get into operation.

I think CZ's make fine guns for the shooting games, but I wouldn't have one for personal protection.

rayatphonix
October 13, 2012, 04:13 PM
I had a Springfield XDS and CZ at the same time and I honestly can't remember having trouble with either or finding the CZ more difficult or switching back and forth between the two. As others mentioned, I never thought about it. I now have 5 CZ's and no XDS's so you can figure out which one I liked the most. Supposedly the slide inside the frame is one of the reasons CZ's are noted for their accuracy but I will neither confirm or deny that as most modern pistols are more accurate than I am.

tekarra
October 13, 2012, 05:03 PM
I have not had a problem with gripping the slide nor have I had a problem clearing a round through the ejection port.

Ash
October 13, 2012, 05:09 PM
I've never had a problem with it, and I have owned CZ's as well as 1911's and other outside frame pistols.

needmorecowbell
October 13, 2012, 05:46 PM
Total non-issue.

Pilot
October 13, 2012, 08:36 PM
I have a 75B, and 75D PCR, and have had them since 1998, and 2000 respectively. Total non-issue for me. Fantastic pistols.

12131
October 13, 2012, 08:46 PM
No problems here, either.

mr.trooper
October 13, 2012, 10:21 PM
Short answer - No, never had a problem with the slide on my 75.

Longer answer - 'Sling shot' is IMO the worst possible way to operate the slide of a pistol, and you need to retrain the way you operate your pistols. That's blunt, but the fact is that no department, agency, or shooting school teaches that for several important reasons.

I read somewhere thar Europeans seldom use a slide release, so the releases are not made to easily release the slide-- never had an issue with that either.

Then why did the designers incorporate a large slide lock lever, and position it directly above the trigger? Seems they wouldn't go through the trouble to do so if slide lock reloads were not being considered.

Yelovitz_503
October 13, 2012, 10:26 PM
I've never had a problem with my current CZ75, or any of the other ones I've owned. My friends P-07 has never given me any trouble either. Honestly it's not that bad, plus you'll try to get better when you realize how wonderful a pistol it is.

Enjoy your new CZ, they're great!

1SOW
October 13, 2012, 10:38 PM
mr. trooper:Longer answer - 'Sling shot' is IMO the worst possible way to operate the slide of a pistol, and you need to retrain the way you operate your pistols. That's blunt, but the fact is that no department, agency, or shooting school teaches that for several important reasons.

Sir, Maybe we're considering different circumstances. To clear a single jam or double jam malfunction in a 75B or any other semi-auto that I can think of, slingshotting the slide is the only 'effective' and "safe" way.

While I'm just a C-class old guy; it was demonstrated to me using my 75B by a past National Champion shooter (Ted Bonnet) demonstrating how to clear both malfunction conditions-safely. It also uses the full compression of the recoil spring that the pistol always uses when fired.

The 75B has a little less surface area to grasp, but is not a problem that a little practice won't fix.

dusty14u
October 13, 2012, 11:00 PM
It hasn't been an issue with my CZ85 Combat.

JohnKSa
October 13, 2012, 11:04 PM
Never had trouble manipulating the slide, but I don't like the fact that any lubrication on the slide rails is exposed to your hands when you rack the slide, unlike the more common frame inside slide configuration.

NG VI
October 14, 2012, 01:33 AM
Never had trouble manipulating the slide, but I don't like the fact that any lubrication on the slide rails is exposed to your hands when you rack the slide, unlike the more common frame inside slide configuration.

Do you have really fluffy hands?

hAkron
October 14, 2012, 02:20 AM
CZ's have tighter chambers than Glocks. When I first started reloading 9mm I used my Glock chamber as a length guage for seating 9mm bullets. As a result, some bullet profiles that were fine in the Glock were a bit too much for my CZ PCR and would jam. Since the slide is inside of the frame, there isn't as much to grab onto to clear that type of jam as a gun with a larger slide and I found it more difficult in that one type of scenario to clear that type of jam. Manipulating the slide in an other normal operation has never caused an issue for me. Other than my too long reloads, I've never had a jam (that I can think of), and I buy a LOT of used, questionably maintained CZ's.

Blackstone
October 14, 2012, 09:13 AM
mr. trooper:Longer answer -

Sir, Maybe we're considering different circumstances. To clear a single jam or double jam malfunction in a 75B or any other semi-auto that I can think of, slingshotting the slide is the only 'effective' and "safe" way.

While I'm just a C-class old guy; it was demonstrated to me using my 75B by a past National Champion shooter (Ted Bonnet) demonstrating how to clear both malfunction conditions-safely. It also uses the full compression of the recoil spring that the pistol always uses when fired.

The 75B has a little less surface area to grasp, but is not a problem that a little practice won't fix.
Why is the hands-over-slide "power stroke" method not an effective or safe way to clear a malfunction?

TJx
October 14, 2012, 10:48 AM
Slide grip is actually one of my pet peeves with today's guns. For me the finish has a lot to do with it
Manufacturers seem obsessed with making slides as slippery as possible I'm guessing because they think it somehow enhances concealed carry.
I even notice a big difference between the current crappy finish on todays Hi Powers versus parkerized.
The Walther PPQ was the worst I ever experienced- slippery finish, goofy slide shape, shallow cocking serrations, and heavy recoil spring.
Best gun I ever handled is my Gen 2 Glock 19.
All this being said I have no problems with my CZ 75's. I was very pleasantly surprised by the grippyness of the polycoat, even my matte SS is not an issue.
Another thing that helps is you're only dealing with a 14lb recoil spring and 20 lb hammer spring on the CZ75.

papaairbear
October 14, 2012, 01:09 PM
Then why did the designers incorporate a large slide lock lever, and position it directly above the trigger? Seems they wouldn't go through the trouble to do so if slide lock reloads were not being considered.

Good question. Here's an article in "Shooting Illustrated" that helps to explain my thoughts: http://www.shootingillustrated.com/index.php/18012/handgun-slide-manipulation/ And a caption under a pic of someone slingshoting a slide reads: "Operating the slide from behind is a popular technique employed by competitive shooters because it is fast. From a tactical standpoint, however, it minimizes your ability to defend against a gun grab."

Roadking Rider
October 14, 2012, 04:06 PM
Those who don't like Cz's will try to make an issue about it, but those who own Cz's know it's really not an issue. I have no problems racking the slide on a 75B, PO1 or 82, even though I'm 66 with with old construction worker hands. A younger person who says it's a problem racking a CZ. Well what can I say?? It's lower bore axis because of the design more than makes up for any inconvenience a smaller slide grip area might cause weather it be real or imagined. Oil on the slide? Your kidding right ? If you have to much oil on the slide and it hinders your ability operate of the slide properly that's your fault not the guns.

jim243
October 14, 2012, 05:08 PM
the frame lessens the amount of exposed slide enough to make it difficult or cumbersome to slingshot the slide.

Really??

The over the top handgun slide manipulation technique is the one taught at Gunsite. It offers a lot of grasping strength and can be used to work the slide, regardless of the reason for doing so.

Either way, no problem for me.

Jim

Pilot
October 14, 2012, 07:29 PM
Those who don't like Cz's will try to make an issue about it, but those who own Cz's know it's really not an issue.


^^^^^And that says it all right there.

JohnKSa
October 14, 2012, 09:36 PM
Quote:
Never had trouble manipulating the slide, but I don't like the fact that any lubrication on the slide rails is exposed to your hands when you rack the slide, unlike the more common frame inside slide configuration.
Do you have really fluffy hands?I'm not sure exactly what that means.

I typically use a very light grease containing fine molybdenum disulfide powder to lubricate the slide rails on autopistols. It's a black color and can be messy if it gets where it doesn't belong. That's not an issue for guns with the frame inside the rail as the lubrication is inside the slide and isn't ever exposed. You don't get it on yourself or on your hands when racking the slide or when the slide is locked back because the lubrication is on an inside surface of the slide.

With the CZ, the slide rails are on the outside of the slide since the slide rides inside the frame. Lubricant on the slide rails is exposed when the slide is retracted and can get on your hands or on anything else the slide rails come in contact with. Racking the slide is one example, another is if you're working on a cold range where holstered pistols have to have the slides locked back.

I don't see it as a major issue, but it is something that I find irritating at times.

CZguy
October 14, 2012, 11:34 PM
I typically use a very light grease containing fine molybdenum disulfide powder to lubricate the slide rails on autopistols. It's a black color and can be messy if it gets where it doesn't belong. That's not an issue for guns with the frame inside the rail as the lubrication is inside the slide and isn't ever exposed. You don't get it on yourself or on your hands when racking the slide or when the slide is locked back because the lubrication is on an inside surface of the slide.

I've used Brownell's action lube on semi-auto's for a long time and have never had that problem.

I apply a thin layer on the slide rails, and then work the action several times manually. When I'm done I wipe off any excess, and have never had a problem.

How heavy do you apply it John?


http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1147/Product/ACTION-LUBE-PLUS-reg-

JohnKSa
October 15, 2012, 12:05 AM
I need to switch to another lube for my 75B--even if there is very little there, you still know it has rubbed off on something when it leaves a black mark on anything it touches.

I typically apply it with a micro-tip flat bit screwdriver. You barely need any there, but if it's going to do anything at all, there needs to be some on the slide rails when you're done.

If the lube you're using is black and you're wiping off so much lube that there's none at all left to leave a black mark on anything it touches then you're wiping off more than the "excess". ;)

At any rate, I can guarantee you that what you're using is nothing at all like what I'm using. No one in their right mind would ever recommend that someone take the moly grease I'm talking about and apply it to "the outside of your guns" to "keep fingerprints neutralized and protect expensive bluing from rust and moisture damage that can occur during storage." I guess it would prevent fingerprint damage because the first time you touched a gun that had this stuff rubbed all over the outside of it, you'd never make that mistake again! :D

chris in va
October 15, 2012, 03:43 PM
I actually cut my palm pretty well during a match when doing a fast reload. I guess the rear sight caused it.

The p01 actually has a concave serration on the back, making it easier to rack with your 'pinch' method.

John...I have used synthetic motor oil for years on my CZ's. Doesn't take much, just a q-tip.

As for the smaller grasping area, I have to say 'yes' that it does add a bit of effort compared to the aircraft carrier Glock 21 I had.

ClickClickD'oh
October 15, 2012, 04:10 PM
That is one of many reasons I no longer own a CZ. That and the tiny ejection port add up to a gun that is far more difficult to clear jams and to get into operation.

More bullarky from the usual suspect. I do double feed failure drills with my CZ all the time and have no problem with them. It do the drill in just under six seconds from double feed to two rounds on target. That's: Failure, tap, rack Failure. Slide lock, strip mag, rack rack rack, insert mag, rack, fire, fire.

Glocks or 1911s don't do it any faster.

777TRUTH
October 15, 2012, 06:58 PM
I am also in the non issue corner.

daybreak
October 15, 2012, 08:03 PM
I am a diehard CZ shooter. I sold all my other pistols and only have CZs and a 1911. At a glance it may seem like it can be annoying, but It's a non issue once you actually run the gun. A friend who I recently turned onto CZs had the same concern. He was very hesitant on buying one because he was convinced the smaller slide would be an issue.

Well, he bought 2 in the same month.

History.Doc
October 15, 2012, 08:34 PM
It is such a non-issue that reading this thread is the most I have ever thought about it.

The Lone Haranguer
October 15, 2012, 11:23 PM
I think we need to define some terms here. What is "slingshotting" the slide? It seems that some people may be interchanging the "slingshot" and the overhand grip. Here is the overhand grip:

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/run-your-gun-cover.jpg

I like this as it gives maximum purchase/grip on the slide for me, it works with all guns, and it is better positioned for stoppage clearing.

Here is what I would consider to be "slingshotting":

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/run-your-gun-slingshot.jpg

This is how you would hold the projectile cup of a slingshot.

I don't like this method. To hold the gun upright while racking the slide, you - or at least I - need to cock your wrist, as in the picture. It works better if you hold the gun on its left side, but if you're clearing a stoppage you need to also roll it to the right side. And if you use it on a CZ, your thumb and finger could very well slip off.

Jonzer77
October 15, 2012, 11:59 PM
I had a CZ SP-01 and while it was different then my 1911's that I am used to, I never had an issue with it. I have read that the slide in the frame helps with accuracy and the CZ I had was pretty darn accurate........I could be wrong though and it wouldn't be the first time :)

rayatphonix
October 16, 2012, 04:03 AM
I had to think if I've ever tried the overhand grip in the photo and I'm not sure I ever have, CZ or Springfield. I'll give it a whirl at the range next time I visit.

Kiln
October 16, 2012, 10:10 AM
With my CZ75B I just use the overhand grip when chambering a round. Haven't had to clear a malfunction yet but if I do I doubt it'll be as big a deal as some make it out to be.

Walt Sherrill
October 16, 2012, 10:16 AM
I don't like this method. To hold the gun upright while racking the slide, you - or at least I - need to cock your wrist, as in the picture. It works better if you hold the gun on its left side, but if you're clearing a stoppage you need to also roll it to the right side. And if you use it on a CZ, your thumb and finger could very well slip off.

An acquaintance, who has worked with Special Ops and Special Forces troops at Fort Bragg for years, as an instructor, told me a couple of years ago, that they are no longer teaching the "sling shot" method as a standard part of handgun drill. (You still need to know how to TAP/RACK/BANG as a clearance drill, of course.)

The reason: too many troops in Afghanistan and Iraq were having problems with the slide NOT going fully into battery after a mag change, using the sling shop method when the slide was locked back. They now teach using the slide release, using either the strong hand thumb, or the offhand as the last step in the mag insertion drill. They rack the slide using the overhand method when they can.

Whether people acknowledge it or not, either method requires "fine motor skills" when it comes to releasing the slide, and it may be that the sling shot method is more prone to problems under combat conditions, especially with the troops are wearing gloves, etc.

When I was shooting competitively (IDPA) I found that I was just as fast, and more sure of myself, using the offhand to release the slide. And the overhand method when I needed to rack the slide. When releasing the slide I didn't use just one finger of the off-hand to depress the release, but several fingers together, like a claw. A "plus" of this technique: you can do it all without moving the gun away from the target area and you don't have to use your strong hand thumb to release the slide -- some folks can't reach it. The sling-shot requires a dramatic move of the barrel away from the target area.

When I've watched the top shooters in the "combat" games, few use the sling shot method, UNLESS they need to clear a jam. It's not life or death in that context, but it is important to them -- and the results mean dollars. So they do what works best for them.

Do what you want and what works best for you. Confidence is important, too.


.

sirgilligan
October 16, 2012, 10:55 AM
No problem with my CZ 85B. I have more problem racking the slide on my Browning Hi-Power. The BHP is so hard, I sometimes cock the hammer first.

I had always pinched the slide from the rear (I am right handed) tilting the gun to about 9:30 position and pulling with my left hand. The BHP was killing me. A friend at the gun store noticed how I was doing it and said clamp the slide with your left hand over the top of the slide and hold with the left hand and push forward with the right hand. Wow, what a difference that made.

JohnKSa
October 17, 2012, 12:20 AM
The reason: too many troops in Afghanistan and Iraq were having problems with the slide NOT going fully into battery after a mag change, using the sling shop method when the slide was locked back. They now teach using the slide release, using either the strong hand thumb, or the offhand as the last step in the mag insertion drill. They rack the slide using the overhand method when they can.Very interesting. A slingshot, if properly executed, is actually MORE likely to result in a proper feeding cycle than using the slide release.

I have tested this with one of my guns. After around 900-1000 rounds without cleaning, it will begin to occasionally have malfunctions when the slide release is used to chamber the first round from a full magazine. However, it continues to work perfectly if that first round is chambered using a proper slingshot technique.

The reason is that a properly slingshotted slide actually has a little more energy since the recoil spring is compressed a little more than it would be if it were simply dropped from the locked open position.

mdThanatos
October 17, 2012, 12:41 AM
I have always used the overhand method on every autoloader I have shot, including my CZ.

Blackstone
October 17, 2012, 05:43 AM
I have to use my offhand thumb to activate the slide release on my CZ 75 SP-01 because it's too far away from my shooting hand thumb. Not a problem once you get used to it.

ClickClickD'oh
October 17, 2012, 10:07 AM
The reason: too many troops in Afghanistan and Iraq were having problems with the slide NOT going fully into battery after a mag change, using the sling shop method when the slide was locked back.

You shouldn't be using the slingshot on the M9 anyways... Unless you like accidentally putting your weapon on safe in the middle of a firefight.

atblis
October 17, 2012, 10:29 AM
I'll be the lone dissenter here. I own several CZs, and do like them very much. However, I have noted the lack of purchase on the slide. I've never had an issue with it, but I could see how others might not like it.

As a side note, the Steyr GB has a slide mounted decocker, and I swear it was designed to aid grip when operating the slide slingshot style.

Ky Larry
October 17, 2012, 10:00 PM
I currently own 7 CZ pistols and a Kimber. Sligshotting the slide has never been a problem for my wife or me. I didn't even know it was considered a problem for anyone. This is the first I've heard of it.

Cactus Jack Arizona
October 17, 2012, 10:40 PM
I have a CZ 75 and a BHP. Honestly, I've never paid it much attention. The only real difference I have between the two is that the slide on the CZ is easier to cycle. Actually, I really like the recessed slide. Makes more sense, and lowers the sights closer in line to the bore.

bikerdoc
October 17, 2012, 10:48 PM
Non issue for me also.

armoredman
October 18, 2012, 01:53 AM
I get yelled at every dept range session for using the slide release - trained that way for more years than some of my "instructors" have walked the planet, and it works well for me. I've honestly not had a failure to chamber from the slide lock that I can remember, with any sidearm. Not saying it didn't happen, but I don't remember it happening.

daybreak
October 18, 2012, 08:17 AM
I always use the power stroke method (hand over top), but ESPECIALLY in my CZs because they are also known for having not so long lasting slide stops.

MTMilitiaman
October 18, 2012, 11:03 AM
Wow guys. Didn't expect this one to go for 3 pages. Thanks for all the input.

As a southpaw shooter, I find the slide release on many pistols can be difficult to reach. This and the fact that I've done most of my pistol shooting with a pair of Glocks, which have small and nearly useless slide releases, means I've gotten used to using the overhand grip. I think the theory about it requiring less fine motor skill makes sense, it works universally among auto pistols, so you don't have to worry about slight changes in location and operation of slide releases among different makes and models, and it works for me.

CZs feel so comfortable in my hand every time I handle one. It gets harder and harder to give it back to the guy across the counter. One of my local FFLs had a P-01 last time I was there. Man that was a nice little pistol. I have an email from a CZ rep saying the P-02 is slated for the US market in 2013. The P-02 is just like the P-01 except instead of DA/SA with only a decocker, which I abhor, it has their Omega trigger system in it, which allows the user to change the pistol to DA/SA with an ambi-safety that allows for cocked and locked carry. Sign me up. I've also been looking at the SP-01. I've been struck by the CZ itch and it sounds like the only way for me to get rid of it and answer my few remaining questions about the design is to scratch the itch.

Thanks again guys.

Kiln
October 18, 2012, 05:17 PM
I don't normally use slide releases except for on my XDM's because they're so easy to reach and use.

With all others I pull the slide back, I've gotten into that habit partially because I own so many small surplus pistols without an external slide release.

As far as the CZ75B goes, I find that it is quicker for me to use the hand over top of slide method than to reposition my hand in order to hit the slide stop lever.

Walt Sherrill
October 18, 2012, 06:38 PM
I don't understand why CZ hasn't made an extended slide release for their guns.

I once had a Compact, shown below, and picked up an extended slide release from an acquaintance. (It was, I think, made for a Tanfoglio model.)

It looked good and make releasing the slide easier. (This gun was traded away a long time ago. The grips are Flame Ambione, made by one grip maker, and checkered by another. (Somebody always asks...)

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y87/WalterRSherrill/CZs/CZ-75BCompact-HiRezLeft.jpg

1SOW
October 19, 2012, 03:55 AM
hAkron:
Why is the hands-over-slide "power stroke" method not an effective or safe way to clear a malfunction?

With a jam, puting your hand anywhere over the ejection port 'can' result in two bad things.
1. The jam won't clear the pistol.
2. The jammed rd will be pulled back hard into the ejector and CAN fire with your hand over the ejection port.

Ash
October 19, 2012, 07:23 AM
Walt, a fair number of Tanfoglio's coming out of Israel, particularly the Mossad models, have extended safeties and magazine releases (certainly not a majority of them, but there are a decent number). You can't do much with the safety but I've done as you and used a Tanfoglio extended release.

hAkron
October 19, 2012, 08:23 PM
hAkron:


With a jam, puting your hand anywhere over the ejection port 'can' result in two bad things.
1. The jam won't clear the pistol.
2. The jammed rd will be pulled back hard into the ejector and CAN fire with your hand over the ejection port.

It was actually Blackstone who asked this. But, it is good info all the same.

1SOW
October 20, 2012, 12:18 AM
OOPs sorry, and thanks.

coalman
October 20, 2012, 03:30 AM
There is the idea of an issue and then the reality of it. IMO, it's the former here. CZs are one of the platforms I'm most competent with. I'll take consistent proficiency over theoretical malfunction drill advantages.

Walt Sherrill
October 20, 2012, 10:10 AM
You can't do much with the safety but I've done as you and used a Tanfoglio extended release.

On the models that have ambidextrous safeties, I supect the SA safeties can be used. Much more to "push on", that way. For those with only a single safety, I don't know of any alternatives, short of custom-made parts.

1SOW
October 20, 2012, 09:21 PM
coalman , I fully understand where you're coming from.
If the habits aren't yet developed, the 'theoretically' safer method can easily become the one that feels most natural and is just as fast and effective.

I buy into the method especially with some CZs like the modern CZ75 variations.

Shooter's choice. When just learning, it's likely "instructor's" choice.

viking499
October 20, 2012, 09:27 PM
Can the SA safety be swapped with the single safety on a 75B, sort of like on a 1911?

Walt Sherrill
October 20, 2012, 09:51 PM
Re: SA safeties in a single-safety gun...

I was told "no" some years back, by CZ-USAs head gunsmith.

Things may have changed. Ask someone at the CZ Custom Shop.

Byrd666
October 20, 2012, 10:18 PM
With a bit over 2000 rounds through my CZ 83, I haven't had a bit of slide trouble, or any trouble whatsoever. It is the absolute, most reliable pistol I carry right now. I know it's about due for a spring change, by what other folks that know more of these things than I do have told me. Sorry I couldn't be more help

tekarra
October 21, 2012, 09:41 PM
I like the extended slide release, will have to get a Tanfoglio one and fit it.

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