CMP Service Rifle - Where to Start in Central TX?


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perdurabo93
October 23, 2012, 06:20 PM
I live a little south of Austin TX and I would like to begin competing in CMP service rifle matches, but I really don't know where or how to start. I have searched on the CMP and TSRA website and have found very few clubs in the area that do service rifle/high power matches of any kind with any regularity. I have tried to contact Austin Rifle Club's high power representative Paul Laberge, but we will not return my repeated emails. On the ODCMP website, I don't see very many service rifle matches in TX, much less in central TX. How is one supposed to learn how to compete without attending any matches? is it expected that you will have to travel quite a bit to compete, even as a beginner? Who else competes in my area that I can talk to and get more information about how wand where to start?

I have my own private 200yd range to practice on and I have gotten pretty good with shooting my M1A from various field positions with it over the years. I have scored "Rifleman" at two separate Appleseed events in the area, but I want to try and take it further by competing in CMP matches... I just don't see very many local matches in my area to compete in.

I've been intimated a little by how much the CMP/NRA matches seem to be very "gear-centric" with all kinds of "non mil spec" gear that goes into CMP competition like stainless match barrels, custom match ammo, shooting jackets, gloves, blinders, diopter glasses, spotting scope stands etc. All that fancy stuff sounds both expensive and not really with the spirit of military rifle target shooting. You'd think a military rifle match would require you to shoot a bone stock (well, at least within the NFA laws) rack grade rifle with standard NATO mil spec surplus ammo, wearing no special clothing or equipment apart from BDUs or street clothes. I know all that extra gear isn't what makes you a competitive shooter, but it seems a little silly to have to have all that stuff to compete in a military service rifle competition when those things aren't really used in shooting the rifle in its original context. Are there ways to get around having to buy all that specialized non-military equipment and still be competitive?

Thanks in advance for any info you can provide.

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Rottweiler
October 23, 2012, 10:53 PM
That's strange that Paul isn't answering your emails. He's usually pretty quick about that.

Another place to look is here http://southtexasshooting.org/ I've shot their matches many times. They shoot their matches just outside of New Braunfels. The guy to talk to there is Jon Ussery. They are affiliated with the CMP so their matches will count toward you buying a CMP Garand.

DJW
October 23, 2012, 11:07 PM
Try showing up at Austin Rifle Club on the first Sunday of any month about 7:30 or 8:00 am with your service rifle, 88 rnds. of ammo, a sling, eye and ear protection, perhaps a shooting mat and spotting scope. Probably a good idea to bring 8 or 10 dollars as well. Best of luck.

BullfrogKen
October 23, 2012, 11:48 PM
I hang out here -

http://www.usrifleteams.com/forums/index.php

You will need to register to view the forum. It's free to register. And the forum is completely dedicated to High Power shooting, both the NRA and CMP disciplines of the sport.


Looking at the new threads there they just completed the Texas State Service Rifle Championship this past weekend at Camp Swift. Looks like an hour from Austin according to Google maps.


How is one supposed to learn how to compete without attending any matches? is it expected that you will have to travel quite a bit to compete, even as a beginner? Who else competes in my area that I can talk to and get more information about how wand where to start?



Hop over to that website and introduce yourself.
Make some friends, and ask for some help learning the sport.
Show up at a match. The only way to learn this is hands-on. Don't worry about not doing well. No one cares if you don't score well. And no one is watching to see how you do. Just be safe. That's all we really care about. And that you had a good time as a new shooter.


I routinely travel to shoot matches. I've shot matches in four different states this year - Ohio, Delaware, Virginia and my home state.

Get hooked into the community of shooters, make friends, and you'll find out where the guys near you go for matches. You might even get invited to carpool.


As far as the gear is concerned, those questions are dealt with over on the forum I linked to. But apart from your rifle all you really need to begin is a pair of binoculars, a winter glove or oven mitt, and a good attitude. You'll find people willing to loan you the stuff you need if you like the sport. Don't go out and buy anything yet.


The sport does use specialized gear and equipment. Just because we have service rifle categories that dictate certain restrictions don't mean this is a combat-type shooting discipline. Nor is there any attempt to "shoot the rifle in its original context" as you put it.

This is a competitive sport, with the key word being sport. The CMP matches just dictate certain types of rifles, limited to certain modifications, are allowed by the competitors playing that sport. And those rifles happen to be restricted to military rifles.


It's a fun sport, but it sure ain't cheap. Don't go buy anything until you know you like playing it. Come play a few games first.

Jeff H
October 24, 2012, 05:42 PM
perdurabo93, I'm in the same boat as you wanting to get into the sport.

I have done a lot of reading on USrifleteams website and even started my 1st thread over there in the equipment forum asking about different things I needed to buy. You might want to check that thread out. It had a couple of pieces of good advice.

It sure isn't a cheap sport, but won't be too bad once the initial investments are paid off. What, a couple thousand rounds a year if you get out and practice or attend a match every 2-3 weeks (I doubt I will be able to get out more than that). So $600 in ammo/year isn't very expensive for a sport.


I do consider myself lucky because my club has a high power league that gets out and shoots high power once a week on Wednesdays so if I can clear my schedule, I can get in a decent amount of practice without the pressures of shooting in a match. I would assume most larger clubs probably do as well.

Jeff H
October 24, 2012, 05:45 PM
But apart from your rifle all you really need to begin is a pair of binoculars, a winter glove or oven mitt, and a good attitude.

Are you saying that a glove is pretty mandatory? I guess that is another thing to add to the list. :D

BullfrogKen
October 24, 2012, 06:01 PM
You'll want something to put on your non-firing hand, if nothing else than to keep the sling from digging into it.

I do consider myself lucky because my club has a high power league that gets out and shoots high power once a week on Wednesdays so if I can clear my schedule, I can get in a decent amount of practice without the pressures of shooting in a match.

Just go shoot those matches. The only pressure in them is the pressure you put on yourself.

If you show up to learn, have good time and forget about how you'll perform around everyone else you'll enjoy the experience. If you let yourself get anxious over performing around others, you'll put needless pressure on yourself.


Seriously, the only thing anyone really cares about is that you compete and handle the rifle safely. You might find someone who gets upset about poor pit service, but if you tell the match director you're new you won't be put in that position. He'll squad you with or next to someone who will show you the ropes.

No one cares where you end up in the match results. I've watched national champions tank a match and get beat by novices. Stuff happens.

Just go. Consider the match a training event.

30Cal
October 24, 2012, 06:44 PM
Just to be clear, There are not many CMP matches anywhere. The only time you'll see a match shot under CMP rules is in conjunction with a regional or state championship.

The bulk of the matches (95%+ of them) are shot under NRA Highpower rules. In NRA matches you can shoot Service Rifle or Match rifle categories.

BullfrogKen
October 24, 2012, 07:10 PM
True, I've seen several CMP matches shot at the conclusion of a weekend of NRA High Power matches. And that suits me just fine.


Go shoot the NRA matches with your service rifle. That's what I do. The course of fire and format is so similar that shooting one is good practice for the other.

Pete D.
October 25, 2012, 05:49 AM
A compete list of every registered NRA HP match in the country is published each month in the free online edition of the NRA "Shooting Sports" magazine.
Pete

gmsharps
October 25, 2012, 07:18 AM
You actually have several locations within a reasonable drive of your area.
The Austin Rifle Club surprised Paul has not answered you he may be out of town.
The Temple Gun Club
There is a club in Waco also that shoots high power.
Going south of you should be New Braunfels and there used to be KD range on a I believe NG post that shot high power. It's been a while due to my mideast assignment since I have been in the area.

BullfrogKen
October 25, 2012, 01:47 PM
A compete list of every registered NRA HP match in the country is published each month in the free online edition of the NRA "Shooting Sports" magazine.

That's good to know. Thanks!

wv109323
October 26, 2012, 10:09 PM
The CMP "Leg" matches for "Leg" points can only be fired at approved Regional Matches , State Championships , and National Championships.
You can fire your CMP Rifle at local NRA matches.

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