Wirehaired Pointing Griffon


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splattergun
November 1, 2012, 07:24 PM
Who here owns one? What do you like best about them? Any breed specific health or behavior problems? Knowing what you know now, would you get another?

Intended purpose, besides being my lil buddy, would be for grouse, pheasant and waterfowl.

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H&Hhunter
November 1, 2012, 09:15 PM
I don't own one but my wife is a Veternarian. We have a large bird hunting contingent in the area and she has a few clients with WPG's. One is breeder so we see a lot of these dogs.

They can be very aggressive to people and other dogs. So watch out for any aggression issues with your chosen breeding. They are also not free from EIC (Exercise induced collapse.) While not horribly common we have a client who has an EIC positive WPG. Most breeders out there will tell you that EIC doesn't exist in the breed, simply not true it does and you need to be aware of EIC being an issue with your dog. And of course your puppies parents should be screened for hip displasia.

I've found that many breeders of these dogs and GWP and such tend to be a bit elitist so make sure and ask the hard questions and demand proof before falling in love with a puppy. If they don't have EIC negative blood tests and canine hip displasia negative certification on the parents you have no way of know what you are getting into health wise.

I was looking at a GWP puppy last month and when I asked the breeder if his dogs were tested for EIC he informed me in no uncertain terms that Vets don't know what they are talking about that there never has been a GWP with a confirmed case of EIC. I just happen to learn after doing some investigating that this puppies full blooded brother has a raging case of EIC. Whoops!!

splattergun
November 1, 2012, 10:50 PM
Thank you H&H, you've brought up information I'm looking for. I should have mentioned that I am looking at a city shelter dog. He's a young pup, no collar or chip, he was caught chasing ducks. :cool: No one has come in looking for him and he's available for adoption tomorrow. So, I have no information on his pedigree. He seems to have some good instincts.

Through my web searches I've learned that they can be "high strung and nervous" around strangers but I didn't equate that to aggression. I'm sure it is 2 sides of the same coin. Hip dysplasia is so common to so many breeds now, it's almost necessary to assume it's in the line. EIC is one reason why I let Labs slip down the candidate list. It is present in the Griffons, fortunately much less common than in the Labrador.

All in all, it seems the WP Griffon seems to be very similar to the German Shorthair Pointer in temperment. I currently own a GSP, so I know all about the need to be the Alpha in order to keep control. Also the need for daily exercise and all that.

I haven't decided yet to get this dog. I do wish I knew his line. Getting a shelter dog can be a crap shoot. One has to be willing to accept the faults that don't show up until it's too late. Did I mention he was caught chasing ducks?

tarosean
November 2, 2012, 02:17 AM
Hip dysplasia is so common to so many breeds now, it's almost necessary to assume it's in the line. EIC is one reason why I let Labs slip down the candidate list. It is present in the Griffons, fortunately much less common than in the Labrador.

As H&H mentioned. A good breeder will test their stock. I am not talking about "Vet checked" as many breeder$ like to claim. Rather documented testing by an accredited Lab or Specialist. More information on what tests each breed should have at the minimum are located here. http://www.caninehealthinfo.org/chicinfo.html.

One of my favorite quotes:

"While you will not change the world by rescuing a dog, you will change that dogs world" - unknown


Good luck in your decision.

Patocazador
November 2, 2012, 09:47 AM
There's a laboratory in Ohio that does the DNA test for EIC and it's not that expensive. I had my Boykin tested free through a pilot program with the Boykin Spaniel Society. It's a wonderful organization .. gives you $75 back if you have your dog's hips checked by OFA and does free eye (CERF) and heart (OFA) checkups every year. Maybe the WPG's parent organization does the same.

H&Hhunter
November 2, 2012, 10:50 AM
I should have mentioned that I am looking at a city shelter dog

My strong advice is that if you like him get him and put up with any medical issues that might arise. I didn't realize that you were talking about a shelter dog. I'd rather see you have him than some city bound dude who's going to keep him locked up in a back yard for his remaining life.

The above medical stuff is important but not so much on a rescue as an expensive puppy bought form a breeder. EIC is rare in the breed.

buck460XVR
November 2, 2012, 11:50 AM
I haven't decided yet to get this dog. I do wish I knew his line. Getting a shelter dog can be a crap shoot. One has to be willing to accept the faults that don't show up until it's too late. Did I mention he was caught chasing ducks?


Your are correct, shelter dogs are a crap shoot. Some shelters will release the name of the previous owner if known and contact can be made to see if there is an aggression problem. Most shelters realize those dogs that are aggressive and will make a point of informing prospective owners. Unfortunately many shelter dogs are there because of a behavior problem, some are genetic, some are learned. Many arise from lack of training and discipline. Many hunting type dogs are bought by non-hunting type folks because they look "cool" and when their desire to hunt(as may be the case in the chasing of the ducks) comes out, these folks try to discipline it out of them. This generally leads to confrontations the dog usually looses. Trying to break a bird dog to quit hunting birds is like trying to train them not to eat......it don't work so well. Sometimes the need by high strung bird dogs for exercise and discipline is more than the previous owner anticipated or can give. Many times just giving the dog the opportunity to hunt and the availability of time and room for sufficient exercise is enough. Sometimes the bad habits are too ingrained to cure. In the case of genetic problems, there is no easy answer. I say give the dog a chance. Pointing Griffons are great dogs and because of what H&H termed "elitism", most breeders are selective enough to breed only dogs with positive characteristics and without genetic issues. If the dog is a worst case scenario, at least you gave it a chance......

splattergun
November 4, 2012, 09:25 PM
We decided to adopt the Griffon. Daughter decided that she is the official owner. We named him Chester. It suits him well. He has had some basic training, but I guess it was inconsistent. Housebreaking and leash training need reinforcement. Sit, come, are also familiar, but also need reinforcement. In my opinion, he is behind in his training for a 6 month old.

I learned that his original owners recently became guests of the Federal Penal System. Their landlord was awarded the personal property in the house, including the dog, to pay for back rent. Landlord basically ignored the guy and animal control found him chasing ducks. He had feathers in his mouth. The officer said he knows the pup's dam, and she's a great pheasant hunter. He didn't know her AKC name, so I can't trace the line that way.

He loves to retrieve! Runs staight out after whatever gets thrown and brings it right in. A pan accidentally dropped in the kitchen brought him running to find out what was happening, so I think he will be readily gun trained. Barring any of the health concerns mentioned above, he shows a lot of potential and I think he will be a fine dog.

My daughter stayed with him here at my house for the weekend, thinking it would be good for my sick dog, and perhaps to have the pup stay with me, as she's a student. He reminds me so much of my German shorthair when he was young. Unfortunately, the pup proved to have too much energy for my sick Pointer to handle. She took him home with her so my dog can rest.

buck460XVR
November 5, 2012, 06:16 PM
Good for you, sounds like a win for you and the dog! If you know who the dam was you may be able to at least find the bloodlines if you know the age of the dog. Could be if it was a registered litter and the original owner never registered your pup, you maybe could. Papers don't mean squat unless you're looking to show, trial or sell pups anyway. Good luck with Chester and happy hunting. Shot my first rooster of the year behind my year old GWPs point last Friday. Nuttin' finer than walkin' up behind a good dog on point.


Can you spot 'er?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v333/buckanddot/100_3302.jpg

MagicD
November 5, 2012, 06:31 PM
Good for you....been hunting with a WPG for past 10 years...it's a short ranging pointing breed and great companion dog. A lot like a GWP but in general, with a bit less horse power in the field. Ones Ive seen had great temperament!

splattergun
November 7, 2012, 08:50 PM
I think he's a good pup and will work out just fine with some good training. Gotta train the trainier first. He picked up a covey of quail yesterday. Pointed for a moment then flushed them. Daughter didn't have a check cord on him then, but she's learning! He's eager to please and full of hunt.
I like that the breed is close working.
Can't get him to be still long enough for a focused pic, but will post one when I can.

grubbylabs
November 9, 2012, 07:01 PM
look for the DVD set from perfection kennels. One of the best training videos I have seen. They actually show you what to do with untrained dogs instead of using master hunters to show you Jr. hunter things.

splattergun
November 9, 2012, 08:33 PM
Thanks grubby, I will look at it.

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