140 gr Nosler Partition .270 Win


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squarepants33889
November 2, 2012, 02:53 AM
http://s1078.photobucket.com/albums/w489/squarepants33889/

Just finished loading 40 rounds in preparation for whitetail season.
I am gonna step up to 140 grainers this year. My load is 56.0 gr IMR 4831 under a 140 gr Nosler Partition.
I am shooting a Sako 85 with a 22 7/16 barrel.
At the range I am shooting just about 2 inches high at 100 yards with a 200 yard zero. I have already put a box of 50 through my rifle, and it groups beautifully. Probably averages right at an inch with 5 shot groups. Now it is time to see how it behaves on a whitetail.
Has anybody here used a similar combination?
If so, how was the performance?
I am just curious to see if the bullet lives up to its reputation.

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squarepants33889
November 2, 2012, 02:54 AM
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Cleftwynd
November 2, 2012, 03:12 AM
Nice Muley!

squarepants33889
November 2, 2012, 03:29 AM
Thanks man. Just got him this October with the muzzleloader. Set the bar pretty high for this hunting season.

41 Mag
November 2, 2012, 06:25 AM
Having used the Partition in several other weights and calibers, I highly doubt you will be disappointed in the performance you see.

As for the 140gr, well to be honest, several years back I started to migrate towards that weight in my 270 as well. It just seemed logical that I could almost match the velocity of the 130's but would have a little better BC and SD using the 140's. Sort of like using a 165gr in a 30-06 over the 150's.

Anyway I digress, but my experiences with the Partitions have always been on the plus side. In my .243's and my 25-06's where I easily hit above 3K FPS with a few loads, they are wonderful, and have always given me the same performance no matter if the range was 20yds or 300+. Even with the .270, 280, and a couple of .308 calibers they did the job just fine at the touch slower velocities. My only issue with them was that for the majority of game I hunted, unless I was pushing the bullets to 3000+fps I really didn't need them.

Good luck with your hunting, from the looks of it you have some fine critters roaming around to hopefully try on out on.

squarepants33889
November 2, 2012, 11:35 AM
41 Mag, your response echoes exactly what I felt.
I was interested in the 140 just because it lent a little more weight without drastically affecting what I have become accustomed to shooting.
As for the need for Partitions, I was wrestling with that last night while I seated each bullet that was worth nearly $1.00.
Last year I hunted with 130 partitions and was completely impressed. Thats why I didn't hesitate to pay $45.00 for a box of 50.
On the flip side, all I currently hunt is whitetail and mule deer. My hunting experience is limited with any other bullet.
My Sako loves 130 gr SST's. At the range I can usually pull off nearly .75" groups.
And my local gun store sells boxes of 100 for about $35.00.
I know many a whitetail has dropped dead in its track to an SST, but I had such amazing results with the Partitions I was leery of changing.
Do you think SST's hold their own when compared to a premium bullet on smaller game(primarily deer)?

ArchAngelCD
November 2, 2012, 01:16 PM
IMO Using a Partition bullet on Whitetail Deer is overkill. I wouldn't be saying that if they weren't so darn expensive but they are very expensive.

I practice with a sierra MatchKing bullet and load a GameKing bullet of the same weight for Deer. I save the Partition bullets for tougher game. If you want a premium bullet that won't break the bank and will do everything for you give the Nosler AccuBond bullet a try. (and at a lesser cost than the Partition bullet)

BUT, if the cost isn't a factor, like said above, I'm sure you won't be disappointed with the Partition bullet in the least. It's still the bullet all others are compared to.

homatok
November 2, 2012, 01:34 PM
I only hunt with Nosler partition bullets! Even at $1 apiece, humane, one shot "Dead Right There" kills are worth the extrs cost! Could I do the same with some other brand/type? Maybe, but I am sold on the partition's performance and won't be changing anytime soon! Happy hunting.

squarepants33889
November 2, 2012, 04:38 PM
I hear ya homatok. Thats why I have kept buying them. I wonder if there is anyone out there who is as adamant about the SST's as there are Partition supporters. I can only recite that which I have read myself, and some folks say that the SST does a nice job of "exploding" in the lung cavity.

41 Mag
November 2, 2012, 11:50 PM
Do you think SST's hold their own when compared to a premium bullet on smaller game(primarily deer)?

and some folks say that the SST does a nice job of "exploding" in the lung cavity.

The SST has turned in some pretty dramatic kills on a few deer and hogs we have used them on over the past few years. This said however, they are simply Hornady's answer to the Nosler BT, and they react accordingly. With the ones I have used in .257, .270, and .308, I can nearly duplicate the accuracy between the two, and thee isn't a whole lot of difference between the internal damage.

If you push them they will devastate the shoulder, almost mirroring the BT, however if kept to muzzle velocities around 2900 or less they do a fine job, like I said, mirroring the BT.

Here is the onside shoulder of a 280# feral hog a friends BIL took out at just over 275yds with a 3000fps muzzle velocity load from a .270,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/PC300173.jpg

While it looks a lot worse than it really is due to the fat being bloodshot, this is pretty normal with about any bullets we have used. What I am trying to point out is the actual hole in the shoulder. While I hogs hide isn't even in the same class as a deers, we have seen similar meat destruction on them as well when we used the SST's and hit something pretty substantial.

Using the Partitions we never had an issue even close to this. Usually simply a three quarter to one inch hole more or less from one side to the other.

squarepants33889
November 3, 2012, 12:10 AM
Wow! Thats the entrance hole? Unreal.
How deep do you figure the remainder of the bullet penetrated? Or did it completely explode?

gamestalker
November 3, 2012, 12:35 AM
I've done a bunch of big game hunting with the .270 win since the start of the 1980's, and have loaded those pills, as well as a host of others with great results.

GS

squarepants33889
November 3, 2012, 01:14 AM
Thanks for input. Just for the record, was there anything you will avoid in the future based on your experience? Bullets or weights that you won't go back to?

41 Mag
November 3, 2012, 05:04 AM
squarepants,

The remainder of the bullet how ever much there was actually made it on through. The shot was slightly quartering so it hit that shoulder and exited about 4" back of the other. The internals were jello.

I have a load for my .270 using a healthy dose of Ramshot Hunter that just barely gets me 3000fps with the SST. I use it primarily when I sit atop a flood levee on my friends property, and might have some pretty longish shots. The ONLY reason I use them for this is that they fit the drop profile on the Burris Mil Dot scope I am using. It makes it very easy to simply put the proper dot for the range on the hogs and send one their way. So far out to 450yds it has been a one shot proposition.

That said, I don't actively look to shoot a deer with one, where as my friend has, as has his BIL. When hit through the thin ribs they do a splendid job of wrecking the internals, but like mentioned if you clip a heavier shoulder, your going to do some trimming. "IF" I am out with them and something walks out that appears to have a small Cedar or Oak on it's head, I would not have much issue with the added trimming if the SST's were what I had in the magazine.

I purchased a decent quantity of some Blem bullets which for all practical purposes, weight, dimensions, and performance, duplicate the SST in all manners. Since I have had a load for the brand name SST, I have used the blems, after checking for accuracy, almost exclusively. I get no difference in performance on the critters or paper.

Another load I use has a 140gr Accubond for the time being. It is loaded to around 2850fps and to date I haven't been able to put one through anything to see how they work. I would imagine they will do a fine job when called upon based upon the many different reports I have read on them in general.

The main difference between you and I however. is that your probably not going to shoot up a hundred or more Partitions during the course of a year while out hunting. You will probably, like you mentioned, have your hunting rounds loaded up and ready to hunt with. You might shoot a dozen or so on actual game, and have the potential at some plenty heavy deer. Our deer MIGHT hit mid 150# on average with a heavy one bumping up to 200. Yours probably, usually start around there for a mature one, and go up. I might easily shoot a hundred or more rounds through a couple of rifles while out hog hunting. While it might not be all at once, it is pretty easy to get out in one weekend, depending on where I am, and drop 20-30 rounds on them if given the chance. Once the shooting starts we try for as many as we can get. Sometimes the odds are in their favor sometimes not, but we keep shooting as long as we have active targets in the open. That is another reason I steer more towards the budget type cup and core bullets as well. It don't hurt my budget nearly as much to pick up the blems or even the top grade cup and cores in bulk, verses getting 5 boxes of 50 of the Partitions for nearly double what a hundred of the others run.

If all I were doing were to load up a box of 50 rounds for hunting period, and not be using them for vermin, I wouldn't have much if any issue with the Partition, like when I was using my .243 and 25-06 exclusively. I loaded up a box of 50 and used them for everythig that came out, even skunks and nuisance squirrels chewing on my feeders, and at years end usually still had half a box or more left over for the next go round. That however was a few years back before the hogs moved in and we got REALLY serious about putting them down as best we could.

Just as a for instance, the pic above was a 130gr SST from a .270, this is a hog I shot at roughly 110yards using my 25-06 AI with the 120gr Rem CL leaving the 28" barrels muzzle at mid 3300fps,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060079.jpg
You can see the shoulder plat somewhat outlined under the hide in the above pic. This hog hit just over 275#.

This was under the onside shoulder after plowing through the 1"+ thick gristle plate and shoulder blade,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060080.jpg

I wished I had an actual pic of the shoulder it's self, but the actual hole was only about 1" in diameter and nothing was really messed up on it other than just the edges of the entry hole. The hole here was mainly due to meat and gristle being displaced as the bullet passed, and not from the bullet actually blowing apart.

Inside the rib cage.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060081.jpg

The shot was angled down and quartered away. The entry would be on the middle right and the exit was at the top left barley in the pic. The CL took out a portion of the bottom of the backbone, and also splintered up some ribs when it exited.

The offside shoulder, where the bullet came through and stopped just before exiting the hide,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060082.jpg
(it looks worse that it really was mainly due to me having already removed the shouldered quarter. Some of this damage was from splintered bone. )

The recovered bullet,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060084.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060085.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Hunting%202010/P3060083.jpg

We were in a bit of a rush to get him dressed out and in the cooler. It was simply a target of opportunity as I caught him out in the open while heading down to work up some loads for this particular rifle. I only had three rounds loaded from the previous day and I had kept them for a just in case chance like this to try out. As you can see however even with some pretty darned harsh impact, and at a somewhat higher velocity than normal, the standard Rem CL held up pretty darned well for what it went through. I would easily wager that the 120gr Partition would have fared pretty equally in the same situation, but for breaking in a new barrel and fire forming cases the CL seemed a MUCH better choice. That said, and after seeing how it preformed on this and several others 40'ish pound hogs since, I am pretty much stuck on keeping the load I have with the CL's for this particular rifle.

squarepants33889
November 3, 2012, 04:55 PM
Thanks a bunch 41 mag. This kind of real life info is invaluable. And for the most part missing from many other online sources. I have found the members of this site are usually more interested in facts than opinions.
I guess the performance of the corelokt proves why it hasnt gone the way of the dinosaur despite all the "modern" bullets on the market.
Sorry to hear about your pig problem. I have only recently become aware of exactly how big a problem an infestation is.

Kachok
November 3, 2012, 11:59 PM
Good ol core-lokts still do the trick, shoot pretty good in most rifles too, but for longer range the SSTs have MUCH better ballistics. Partitions do live up to their reputation, but that level of penetration is a bit of an overkill for deer IMHO Better suited to elk though they should put a deer down plenty quick. The biggest advantage to partitions is that they almost cannot have a total bullet failure, even if the front portion over expands and comes completely apart (unlikely) the rear portion of the bullet will keep going through the vitals, fantastic bullet.

GooseGestapo
November 4, 2012, 09:11 AM
Nosler partitions are GOOD bullets. However, they're grossly over priced, IMO.
I get just as good of performance from the Hornady "Interloks" as I do the Partitions. Similar retained weight and usually better penetration....
The Hornady's I've recovered usually weigh 10-20% more than recovered Partitions. The only Partitions I've been pleased with were some old "screw-machined" .338" 210gr that I picked up at a lgs going out of business. Still have a "life-time" supply of them....

I used a 140gr Partiton from my 7mm08 @ 2,700fps on a 85lb doe. I recovered the expanded bullet after ~18" penetration. A Sierra or Hornady would have typically exited such a small deer. A friend however, put three of these from the same box through a 6x6 bull elk 4wks earlier (broad-side at 250yds... same gun, same sight-in, in 2006). Go figure! Recoverd bullet had completely shed the front portion and foward remaining jacket material was folded back along the shank leaving essentially a "wadcutter" slug... Weighed ~90gr.

I'm not "slamming" the Partitions. Just saying there's a reason that most hunters are satisfied with the Sierra's, Speer's, Hornady's, and Remington Corlokts...... From my experience, the CorLokts will actually out-perform the Nosler's.... But I've only killed about 100 deer with various Corlokts.... .24-.35cal. Yes, I've seen some jacket seperations, but the bullet core still exits.... (typically with the Winchester "Power-Points", occasionally with a Sierra, but never with an Interlok or "Corlokt". Core seperation is not a failure of a "deer" bullet in my mind.

From my .257wby, I've been completely satisfied with the Hornady 100 and 117gr "Interloks". I've only recovered one. It was a 100gr bullet @ 3,600fps m/v. At 90yds, It lodged under the hide on the far side of the deers rib cage ranging diagonally through the chest. Recovered bullet weighs 67.5gr.... 2/3 weight retention... Totally acceptable.... Same bullet fired at 3,000fps from my .257Robt usually completely penetrates... I've only recovered one 117BtSpt "Interlok". That deer field dressed 240lbs (largest bodied I've ever taken) and was hit at ~260yds with my .257Robt. M/V of 2,700fps. Bullet transited chest after hitting last rib and was lodged under hide of far shoulder after breaking humerous. Bullet weighs 102gr....
Acceptable performance.
Use the Nosler's with confidence. But if you want good performance at 1/3 the price, use the Hornady's. Weatherby factory ammo has used them for over 50yrs....
From my .300RUM, the good ole 180gr Flat-Base Interloks are impressive, to say the least.... at least as good as the Noslers, perhaps even better.... higher retained weight....and 1/4 the cost...

re: penetration; Typically, the expanded bullets "swap ends" and penetrate base first as this is lower drag form. This, with higher weight retention is why the Interloks and Corlokts "out-penetrate" the Noslers, in my experience....

elkslayer4x5
November 4, 2012, 01:28 PM
I load Hornady's 140 gr SPBT for my .270 Win, and find it to be devestating, retains more fps @ 200 yds than I can with a 150 gr load and give me more KE than the 150 gr would, much more leathal than the standard 130 gr load.

squarepants33889
November 4, 2012, 03:38 PM
Good to hear. My hunting "mentor" has been a long time proponent of interloks and SST's as well. He typically hunts with a 6.5x55 or a 7mm-08. Does a couple hundred fps make a huge difference on the terminal ballistics when going thru a "soft" deer?
One of my biggest weakness regarding this subject is my actual field experience. I've only got a couple of hunting seasons under my belt. I spend an awful lot of time reading magazines and forums, but my limited experience is already showing me that actual field results are often a little different from what some gunwriters or magazine advertisers would like you to think.
You all have cited, from actual experience, that the most expensive bullets don't always give a superior advantage.
Here is another question for you guys. Do you think different bullet weights make a dramatic difference on a medium-large size deer?
I know I have often read of loading 150 grainers in a .270 when after moose or elk. Part of the reason I switched to 140's from 130's was to add a little punch to my Sako. Not that it seemed to need it, but in the pursuit of performance and such.
Now, considering what y'all have written considering bullet performance, I am wondering if 10 extra grains translates to much real world difference.

squarepants33889
November 4, 2012, 05:11 PM
http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w489/squarepants33889/IMG_2636.jpg

Just testing to see if firefox posts these pics a little better

foxtail207
November 4, 2012, 06:36 PM
I load .270 with IMR4831 at 56 grains also, but I use the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tips (yellow point). They are amazing on white tail deer. If you hit the sweet spot it will jellify just about everything inside... major internal damage, without a lot of meat damage. Deer don't run! Plus I have found these to be very accurate bullets at that load in my BAR.

kelbro
November 4, 2012, 07:15 PM
I've had good luck with them but truth be told, I don't think that there is a bad 270 bullet weight or type for whitetail at 300yds or less. Bad shots account for more lost deer than bad bullets.

Find one that your gun likes and practice with it. Know the POI at 50-100-150-200-250 and 300 and you'll be eating backstraps.

elkslayer4x5
November 5, 2012, 12:32 PM
Good to hear. My hunting "mentor" has been a long time proponent of interloks and SST's as well. He typically hunts with a 6.5x55 or a 7mm-08. Does a couple hundred fps make a huge difference on the terminal ballistics when going thru a "soft" deer?
One of my biggest weakness regarding this subject is my actual field experience. I've only got a couple of hunting seasons under my belt. I spend an awful lot of time reading magazines and forums, but my limited experience is already showing me that actual field results are often a little different from what some gunwriters or magazine advertisers would like you to think.
You all have cited, from actual experience, that the most expensive bullets don't always give a superior advantage.
Here is another question for you guys. Do you think different bullet weights make a dramatic difference on a medium-large size deer?
I know I have often read of loading 150 grainers in a .270 when after moose or elk. Part of the reason I switched to 140's from 130's was to add a little punch to my Sako. Not that it seemed to need it, but in the pursuit of performance and such.
Now, considering what y'all have written considering bullet performance, I am wondering if 10 extra grains translates to much real world difference.
Yes, personally I think every litle bit helps. Below is a section of the Chuck Hawks ballistics chart, pertaining to 270 Win. and the difference between 130 gr, 140 gr, and 150 gr bullets;
muzzle 100yds 200 yds 300 yds
270 Win. (130 PP+) 3150/2865 2881/2396 2628/1993 2388/1646
270 Win.(140 BT) 2950/2705 2751/2352 2560/2038 2378/1757
270 Win. (150 PP+) 2950/2900 2679/2391 2425/1959 2184/1589
I think that the velocity/energy at 200 yds makes the point, best balance between all three, just over 2500fps with a ton of KE. And just in case you don't have the link to the Chuck Hawks site, here's that for you.

http://www.chuckhawks.com/rifle_ballistics_table2.htm

squarepants33889
November 6, 2012, 01:14 AM
Numbers don't lie.

Considering that my rifle hasn't ever done a great job with 150's, I don't feel bad about launching a zippy 140.

I would have thought I would have heard a few more people bringing up Barnes bullets. I haven't tried them myself, but they occupy a lot of print space and tv time.

ArchAngelCD
November 6, 2012, 01:56 AM
Numbers don't lie.

Considering that my rifle hasn't ever done a great job with 150's, I don't feel bad about launching a zippy 140.

I would have thought I would have heard a few more people bringing up Barnes bullets. I haven't tried them myself, but they occupy a lot of print space and tv time.
I really haven't shot Barns bullets and I'm not sure why. I do shoot a lot of Nosler and Sierra bullets. Both company's bullets have worked well for me and at a fair price too.

(never tried Speer rifle bullets either)

elkslayer4x5
November 6, 2012, 11:23 AM
Neither have I. Most likely, because I'm pretty satisfied with the performance of Hornadys 140gr BTSP Interlock, don't know if it could get any better, and that they cost less than the Barnes Bullets, you know...a penny saved, and so on. LOL :)

GooseGestapo
November 6, 2012, 04:27 PM
A heavier bullet won't always perform better on light game such as the whitetail deer.
Whitetails actually don't require as much killing as you'd think. However, unless you disrupt enough of their innards to get massive rapid exanguation (bleed-out) or interupt the nervous system (brain or spine hit), they can run a long ways in a short time making recovery difficult or impossible.
The 130gr is about perfect in the .270 as you get rapid expansion from the velocity, flat trajectory making a good hit easier to longer distances, and sufficient retained velocity to make the bullet perform as intended to longer distances. This is where the .270 has excelled for all these years. It did this without the kick of the magnum .30's and bigger.

When you go to heavier bullets you lower the muzzle velocity. The retained velocity of the heavier bullets dosen't entirely compensate for this. Below ~1800fps, you loose much of the bullet performance as this or more is needed to initiate expansion. Also, heavier bullets usually feature thicker jackets and stiffer alloys in the core to further enhance the penetration needed for larger game. This results in less expansion, hence less transfered energy on a small animal like the whitetail deer.

The end result is that you don't get the desired performance on lighter game such as the Pronghorn Antelope or Whitetail/mule deer.

The 140's are something of a "compromise" bullet. Better retained energy and sectional density for good penetration, but enough initital velocity for quick expansion.

Food for thought..... When I was a teenager in the late 60's, the Speer, Sierra's, and Hornady's were the "premium" bullets. Top accuracy and on-game performance but priced to match it. The Nosler Partitons were the "super premium" bullets for "rich folks" that could afford them. Now, it's the Bitter-roots, Barnes, Swift, and Woodleigh's that are the super-premium bullets at $2 each or more....
The Interloks, Hot-Cores, and ProHunter/GameKing bullets are sufficient for deer/mule deer/antelope and such. No need to "gild the lilly". (ie:gold plate a beautiful flower).
Funny how that now, the Winchester Silver-tips, Power-points, and Remington Corlokts are more expensive than the Sierra's, Hornady's, and Speer's.....
Go figure!

41 Mag
November 7, 2012, 07:35 PM
GooseGestapo nailed it in the above post. Not much difference in performance when comparing the 150gr and 165gr .308 bullets as well, but with the little added weight you get more for your return, just like your looking at.

As for the Barnes, well I have shot plenty of them but they were all of the original design. Not much added cost as I got them on clearance, as they phased them out to make way for their newer creations. To be honest they killed a deer and they killed a hog, but other than that, they weren't really needed.

To be quite honest, I personally feel that the discontinued Nosler Solid Base was about the best thing ever. Folks can tout they BT's are simply the SB with a better BC, but there is simply no comparison in performance between the two other than the manufacturer. I have shot them both side by side on game and while I DO admit that the BT might edge out a tiny bit more accuracy, I would gladly trade that in a heart beat for the all around penetration, and constant expansion I got, and still do get with the SB's.

Like I mentioned somewhere up above, I have shot plenty of the "premium" bullets over the years, and I always end up going back to the basics. Why? Because they work over and over again, and are usually pretty forgiving when working up loads as well.

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