4 inch ruger redhawk .44 tolerances question?


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jimbombo
November 3, 2012, 04:04 PM
Hello.
Just picked up a lnib Redhawk with 4" barrel in .44 mag. Small seam between the trigger guard and frame. Gun seems to function OK The Plunger that locks the trigger group to the frame does not seat all the way, any opinions if this could be a possible problem with transfer bar, pawl, or cylinder lock???

THanks.
Jim

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Lost Sheep
November 3, 2012, 04:29 PM
Hello.
Just picked up a lnib Redhawk with 4" barrel in .44 mag. Small seam between the trigger guard and frame. Gun seems to function OK The Plunger that locks the trigger group to the frame does not seat all the way, any opinions if this could be a possible problem with transfer bar, pawl, or cylinder lock???

THanks.
Jim
My opinion: This is not a problem with any of the internal parts you mentioned. If the gun functions and locks up properly it is fine.

If it bothers you, you could try this: Take the gun apart (obviously you have done this before), clean the trigger group casting with a stiff-bristle toothbrush and toothpaste, paying particular attention to where its surfaces mate with the gun's frame. Thoroughly dry, lightly lube and reassemble. This will clean out any dirt or debris that may be interfering with the fit of the parts. But I doubt this will make any difference. Dirt buildup or fouling in these areas is unlikely.

Make sure the plunger you mention has free movement (against the spring, of course).

When reassembling, depress the plunger and release it several times to ensure the trigger group casting is seating properly.

Do not succumb to the idea of polishing down any mating surfaces seeking to improve the alignment of that seam. If the gun works, don't mess with it.

These guns are made from investment castings and Ruger keeps costs down by only machining in the places that are required for proper function, not for aesthetics.

Enjoy your gun.

Lost Sheep

jimbombo
November 3, 2012, 04:48 PM
The problem is the trigger group where it meets the back part of the frame by the plunger, i am pretty sure just a little work would make it fit snug and eliminate the seam. I was thinking green scotchbrite and some gun oil(i know not to start removing metal, don't want to go there :)) just to smooth things out a little! Would you reccomend against this??

Thanks..

jimbombo
November 3, 2012, 04:52 PM
I guess the thing that concerns me a little is with the trigger group plunger only seating half of the way(it does lock the trigger group in) could it come loose during heavy recoil???

KevTac
November 3, 2012, 07:23 PM
I had a similar seam issue on one of my Super Redhawk Alaskans. I took it apart and cleaned it up like was stated above but it was still there. Everything functioned fine and there were no issues but it still kinda bugged me. What I did was to take some 600 grit wet/dry paper and cut it into small strips. I then used it to make it so the seam was more even all the way across on both sides. it doesn't give it the "all one piece" look but IMHO, it doesn't need to look that way. Besides, the more you take it apart to clean, the more you will ding up that delicate little edge anyway. They way I did mine, it still looks like it was meant to be and is easier to keep that way.

Walkalong
November 3, 2012, 09:41 PM
It should go up a little more and the plunger should seat fully. I am not sure what it holding it off though.

Do not succumb to the idea of polishing down any mating surfaces seeking to improve the alignment of that seam.
Agreed.

skidder
November 4, 2012, 01:55 AM
I purchased an unfired Security Six today and took it apart to clean out the factory gunk. When I was putting it back together mine did the same thing (small gap like yours), pushed pretty hard with no results. A few taps on the back of the trigger guard with a rubber mallet was all it needed. The small gap was gone and the plunger fully engaged. :)

BCRider
November 4, 2012, 02:55 AM
A rubber mallet or a block of softwood and a few raps from a hammer is what came to me as well. If a few moderate bumps from such non marring options does not seat the trigger group fully then I'd look at other options.

Clearly the trigger group did seat fully at some point since Ruger obviously does the final outer sanding and blending to put the final surface finish on it when these parts are all in one piece. The little step at the rear of the trigger group shouts that it's simply not quite seated as the factory was able to manage. A little "gentle persuasion" should get it seated the the gap closed.

Lost Sheep
November 4, 2012, 03:30 AM
I guess the thing that concerns me a little is with the trigger group plunger only seating half of the way(it does lock the trigger group in) could it come loose during heavy recoil???
Coming loose during firing is extremely unlikely.

skidder and BCRider may have the answer. A little roughness where the parts come together may be keeping the trigger assembly from dropping into place.

Smoothing things may do the trick to cure that. A little rapping with a wood block or rubber mallet, if it does the trick, might confirm this. Some judicious smoothing would produce a permanent cure. But remember "smoothing" is just another word for "polishing" which is just another word for removing metal, albeit not as much as machining, or even sanding does.

Just go slowly and minimally.

Good luck.

Lost Sheep

hatchetbearer
November 4, 2012, 03:40 AM
I havent pulled my redhawk apart, but my gp100 did this, the spring that holds this together is pretty stout. i thumped it with a screwdriver handle and all was better.

Salmoneye
November 4, 2012, 06:29 AM
There is a speck of grit or something preventing full seating...

It may be a burr...

codefour
November 4, 2012, 10:54 AM
IF you are curious about the trigger guard to frame fit, they are very tight. When I replaced my spring with a reduced Wolfe spring, it would not seat flush. Use a rubber mallet and give it a light whack on the trigger guard. It will seat perfect and all of a sudden be in alignment. My dad's Redhawk had the same problem. He called Ruger and they told him to use a mallet like they do.

When dad told me to use mallet, I thought he was nuts but it worked.

Also a Wolfe spring kit worked wonders for the trigger in both double and single action. You can also polish the sear and trigger contact point with an India stone to eliminate 90% of the trigger creep. Do NOT remove any metal. You are just polishing it.

Remllez
November 4, 2012, 08:22 PM
A little oil and working the plunger with a dowel or another suitable pusher before putting the assembly back in usually does the trick. Also hold the frame by the top strap and front of the trigger guard with one hand and rapping the trigger guard with a screwdriver handle usually does it. They are tight for a reason.

Remllez
November 12, 2012, 10:17 AM
OP,

Did you get the trigger group to seat properly? If so what finally worked for you?

jimbombo
November 13, 2012, 01:20 AM
Stripped the trigger group put light oil on all mating surfaces then just kept seating and unseating for about 20 times, and looks much better! Thanks for all the help and ideas.!

Remllez
November 13, 2012, 10:02 AM
VICTORY!!

Always glad to see a happy ending....way to hang in there.

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