reloading ?s for .223


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jhei88
November 3, 2012, 04:01 PM
Hey just started loading for my ar in .223, was just wondering if crimping was required in this caliber or not. My load is 22 grs of cfe .223, 55 gr soft point bullet and oal of 2.200. Thanks

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rikman
November 3, 2012, 04:15 PM
I never have...There is enough neck tension. My die set, Redding National set doesn't have a crimp die in the set.

jhei88
November 3, 2012, 04:33 PM
could any body tell me how my load data looks, just to make sure its safe. thanks

wgaynor
November 3, 2012, 05:04 PM
Maybe I"m wrong, but I always crimp for semi-autos. This is my insurance against bullet setback.

jhei88
November 3, 2012, 05:16 PM
ok so one for yes and one for no, anybody else who could settle this. I usually do but i tend to over crimp and crush necks.

Tim the student
November 3, 2012, 05:17 PM
I haven't seen any need to yet.

italy4nra
November 3, 2012, 05:24 PM
I just like to. Gives the ammo a nice smooth commercial look without that hard edge. I always worry the edge will bind on something unless I crimp.

ArchAngelCD
November 3, 2012, 05:37 PM
could any body tell me how my load data looks, just to make sure its safe. thanks
Welcome to the forum...

You can get current load data for all Hodgdon/ IMR/ Winchester powders on the Hodgdon Load Data site (http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp). Before you use that load I highly suggest you check the Hodgdon site because according to them your charge weight is VERY light.

As for crimping, although it's not necessary I always put a light crimp on all my rifle rounds. It's just my choice though.

Sniper66
November 3, 2012, 05:49 PM
I've loaded a few 1,000 rds of .223 and never crimped one yet. I shoot very tight groups at 100 yds with my Rem 700 and whack lots of p-dogs with no crimping.

dap22
November 3, 2012, 07:02 PM
I'm sure you don't have to crimp but I sure do feel better doing so. Plus, my .223 Dillon die set comes with a crimp die which sealed the deal for me. Setback is an ugly thought.

FROGO207
November 3, 2012, 07:44 PM
As stated above the crimp is unnecessary if you have enough neck tension in the first place. I always make sure I have enough neck tension and do not crimp my rifle rounds----with the caveat that a tube fed MAG DOES always need to be crimped to prevent bullet setback. If you can't push the bullet back into the case with hand pressure when trying to push the bullet against the reloading bench without damaging your fingers you have enough neck tension. Years ago I tried using both the 308 and the 223 an experiment to see if crimping would make a difference. I used bolt action rifles and made 400 rounds for each of the two rifles. I used the same (all the same weight /brand of brass, same lot of weighed bullets etc.) components and took the time to trickle the charges to the exact same weight. 200 crimped and 200 not crimped rounds. I shot them off a machine rest at 100 YDS with 2 minutes between shots all on the same day alternating rifles. The surprise was the uncrimped ammo in both rifles was ever so slightly better.:) Try it yourself and see if you get the same thing or if my experiment was a fluke. So now I do not bother crimp my brass for maximum accuracy other than for tube fed firearms. YMMV

DDawg
November 3, 2012, 10:42 PM
I've always heard you want to crimp ammo that goes in a magazine. Spend the 20 something dollars and get the lee factory crimp die. Easy peasy, no worries.

rg1
November 3, 2012, 10:55 PM
While CFE 223 powder is relatively new and not listed in many manuals, I think you need to check all available data sources for your powder and bullets. From what I've seen your charge is very low for a 55 grain bullet but definitely check for sure. Might be ok to start load work-ups at your charge level. Hodgdon has data on-line. Your load MAY be too low and not even cycle your AR?

Sport45
November 4, 2012, 12:08 AM
If the bullet has a cannelure you may crimp, but then you are stuck with loading to the cannelure.

If the bullet doesn't have a cannelure I wouldn't suggest using a crimp.

I don't crimp anything I run in my AR's.

ROGER4314
November 4, 2012, 12:59 AM
I have never crimped the .223 nor do I crimp other rounds. The most I do is remove the "bell". I call that "zero bell" crimp.

Be very careful about excessive force from seating the bullet or crimping as the .223 has a bad habit of collapsing at the shoulder. If forms a bulge then it won't chamber.

Flash

jhei88
November 4, 2012, 08:12 AM
took a look at the data, looks like 22 grains was a bit low should be using somethng like 26 grains. I shot the 22 grainers nowing for well that they were under powerd, but they fired fine. So in the future can i just stay under the data, or should i up it.

W.E.G.
November 4, 2012, 08:37 AM
I'm kind of new to the game of reloading .223

Now granted, I've only been doing it for about 20 years, and only about 20,000 rounds.

I've never crimped .223

I'm sure the military has their reasons why they want all their ammo crimped.
Whatever those reasons are, they have not shown themselves to me.

Walkalong
November 4, 2012, 08:54 AM
For .223 which many be fired in an auto, I put a light to medium crimp on my cheap plinking loads with 55 or 62 Gr FMJ ammo, as well as my good rainy day ammo. The rainy day ammo has to work first, and be accurate second.

I do not crimp rounds loaded to be accurate above all else.

There are many things that make a much bigger difference on target than whether you crimp or not.

eam3clm@att.net
November 4, 2012, 09:31 AM
I also crimp my .223 rounds, but just because I want to. You can test for bullet setback by letting a round cycle in the action a few times. Just let the bolt slam shut. Then measure if the bullet sets back. But remember since your loading soft point bullets, the tip of the bullet may deform from feeding and give a false reading. I also like the lee FCD in this case. Since it uses a collet to squeeze the case mouth, the amount of crimp does not relate to the actual length of the case ie longer brass will have more crimp and run the risk of deforming the shoulder, while shorter brass will not crimp as much.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 4, 2012, 09:33 AM
I use a light crimp into the cannelure, mostly for keeping the pill held strongly at the case mouth. Unlike large-caliber revolvers, with 'barn-burner' loads, I'm not worried about bullet-jump due to any harsh recoil.

GLOOB
November 4, 2012, 01:29 PM
If you are getting good neck tension, you do not have to. But be careful if you lube your case necks. A little leftover lube could allow setback on chambering. If you're not getting good neck tension, check the diameter of your bullets. If good, you might need to sand down your expander ball a touch.

I've only personally seen a 223 setback due to a malfunction where the nose didn't clear the mag lip; and this was with a flat nose cast bullet, at that. Thankfully, the setback round did not chamber, even though my rifle feeds empty cases.

kayaks
November 4, 2012, 09:22 PM
My vote is to use the Lee crimp die. I have a Hornady LNL progressive press and it doesn't get in the way of the operation. I don't get carried away with it, but I think a light crimp is good insurance...

WVRJ
November 4, 2012, 09:39 PM
I always crimp my 223's that go in my AR with a Lee collet crimp die.Cheap insurance the way I see it.I don't crimp for any of my bolt actions,I think there might be a little gain in accuracy by not crimping.

Danco411
November 4, 2012, 09:58 PM
I crimp only bullets with cannelures, mainly 55 FMJ seated half into the cannelure with a Lee Factory Crimp Die. This is plinking ammo that I store loose in an ammo can. Piece of mind I guess. I never crimp none cannelured bullets or anything match.

dgod
November 5, 2012, 10:41 AM
Amen, Small step, ensures safety and prevents any weather getting to your powder..

Dan

Night time comfort,
Colt Agent 45ACP, CT Laser, a Remington 870 Tactical, CT Laser, and 190 Lumen Night Light.

All the time comfort,
Colt LE, 5.56mm, Quad Rails, Laser, 150 Lumen Light, 8 Magpull 30’s, a Henry 45LC Mares Leg, a Winchester Model 94, 3030, a H&K MP5, a Sig Sauer Mosquito, Savage 17HMR, Sweet 17 Scope. A Remington .243, a Beretta 92FS, a CZ 75 (Original) Still a Tack Driver), And about 20 others, too many to list.

Reloading all but the 17, 22LR and the 12

ArchAngelCD
November 5, 2012, 10:49 AM
took a look at the data, looks like 22 grains was a bit low should be using somethng like 26 grains. I shot the 22 grainers nowing for well that they were under powerd, but they fired fine. So in the future can i just stay under the data, or should i up it.
You should never load ammo below the recommended starting charge weight. It can be just as dangerous as loading over the max charge weight. There is a very good reason why they list both min and max charge weights, both are important. Safety first when loading, safety first!

CountryUgly
November 5, 2012, 03:18 PM
I'm running virtually the same load as you in my Colt AR. I don't crimp that particular plinkin load. However as already mentioned you are running it a bit light I'm loading at 26.5gn (not saying you should but you might want to recheck the load data) with good results. It cycles well and is more than accurate for range work.

Sport45
November 5, 2012, 09:07 PM
Amen, Small step, ensures safety and prevents any weather getting to your powder..


How's that? There is already an interference fit between the bullet and case neck. A crimp won't add any additional sealing to that.

I'm not against crimping into a cannelure and don't think it hurts anything at all there.

Ky Larry
November 6, 2012, 05:32 PM
All my .223s are bolts, so I never crimp.

liberty -r- death
November 6, 2012, 05:37 PM
I have loaded over 10,000 rounds of .223 to date and have never used a crimp. Never had a feed issue.

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