Unboxing Track of the Wolf's Bucks County flintlock rifle kit


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duelist1954
November 5, 2012, 07:42 AM
I am starting a project to build a Bucks County style flintlock long rifle using a kit from Track of the Wolf. This project will take me quite a while, and I'll give you periodic video updates as the work progresses. In this video I'll show you exactly what come in the Track of the Wolf kit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJBNg_NLASA

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Harrod
November 5, 2012, 08:13 AM
Great vid Mike, I can't wait for following progress videos.
I have been thinking about doing a kit gun, I would love to have a 36 flinter but I have no experience with that kind of thing.
Looks like a lot of fun and the idea of something you made yourself is just awesome.

1KPerDay
November 5, 2012, 01:10 PM
Very interesting. Looking forward to future vids. I've assembled a few kits but nothing that required that amount of work (inletting the stock for the barrel, etc.)

Cosmoline
November 5, 2012, 01:28 PM
Good stuff! I hope you post some detailed vids of your approach. I've assembled a few parts kits but I'm not satisfied with my work on any of them.

BigG
November 5, 2012, 03:25 PM
Very nice demonstration and explanation. I'll want to see the finished product!

Olmontanaboy
November 6, 2012, 05:41 AM
That's a really great and informative video Mike, I look forward to future installments.

Crawdad1
November 6, 2012, 09:54 AM
You're close to Dixon's and their fair that they have. Some good stuff being taught there and a lot of those guys build those Eastern Pa longrifles. That Allen Martin he builds a beautiful Lehigh rifle. What barrel, lock and trigger are you using?

mykeal
November 6, 2012, 02:30 PM
Do you really believe the half cock position qualifies as a safety?

duelist1954
November 6, 2012, 07:16 PM
Treblig, I've been to the Dixon's Rifle Builders' Fair 25 times. I was at the first one they had. Missed this year's due to a family commitment. All the component info is in the video.

mykeal, yes, I consider the half-cock notch to be a safety. I've been hunting with flintlocks for almost 40 years. You can't do it without a half-cock notch. As long as you take reasonable precautions, and have a well-made lock, it is quite safe.

For what it's worth, I was brought up on a farm in far northern Vermont, and we hunted with our Winchester and Marlin .30-30s on half-cock. That's why they put those notches on the guns.

Steel Horse Rider
November 7, 2012, 12:09 AM
Thanks for making that video. I'll be waiting for the updates. I've ordered a percussion pistol kit from Dixie Gun Works and if it goes well I'll be trying a flinter in the future.

Crawdad1
November 7, 2012, 12:38 PM
Mike, I can see why you decided on a Bucks County longrifle. Those are some beautiful lines on that 'School' of rifle and they're not as radical as the Lehigh.

mykeal
November 7, 2012, 04:03 PM
We have different views as to why the half cock notch was implemented. I agree it's a hunting convenience; I've used it for that myself many, many times. However, to trust it as a safety is, in my opinion, a serious mistake. The only 'safe' position in a flintlock is frizzen open (forward) and hammer down on an empty pan.

duelist1954
November 7, 2012, 08:00 PM
That's like saying the only safe position on a Sharps or Rolling Block rifle is "empty". Certainly that is the most safe position, but not the only safe position.

Half-cock notches on quality flintlocks are deep and the sear is robust. Nothing short of empty is perfectly safe, but there is no doubt that half-cock was designed as a safe carry mode that has the gun available for action in a reasonable time.

In my state of Pennsylvania, an otherwise loaded flintlock with an unprimed pan is considered legally to be unloaded.

Modern mechanical safeties may differ in style, but they all perform that same function as the half cock notch, and they are all just as liable to failure due to abuse or stupidity. That doesn't stop them from being safeties under normal operating scenarios.

CraigC
November 7, 2012, 08:29 PM
Folks have been trusting half cock notches for centuries. IMHO, it would be silly beyond measure to wait for a buck to walk out before you primed your flintlock, capped your caplock, levered your levergun or loaded you single shot. :rolleyes:

mykeal
November 7, 2012, 10:31 PM
it would be silly beyond measure to wait for a buck to walk out before you primed your flintlock, capped your caplock, levered your levergun or loaded you single shot.
That's correct. It would be. And nobody said otherwise.

I'm suggesting that one treat the gun as if it were fully cocked. That's all.

there is no doubt that half-cock was designed as a safe carry mode that has the gun available for action in a reasonable time.

I agree. But being designed to perform a function isn't always the same as actually performing that function reliably and consistently.

In my state of Pennsylvania, an otherwise loaded flintlock with an unprimed pan is considered legally to be unloaded.
Same thing in Michigan, but what that has to do with this is not clear to me.

Modern mechanical safeties may differ in style, but they all perform that same function as the half cock notch, and they are all just as liable to failure due to abuse or stupidity.
I'd agree that modern mechanical safeties are designed to perform the same function as the half cock notch, but I don't agree that they actually perform the same function. Most are much better, although I admit there are worse designs out there. And of course, as you suggest, you can't fix stupid; no safety can do that.

I carry my long rifles loaded, primed (frizzen down) and with the hammer on half cock. But I don't assume it's safe in that configuration; I treat it as if the hammer was in full cock. When I teach hunter safety, I do not refer to the half cock as a safety - it's simply half cock. It's a position that's more safe than full cock, but it's not a safety position per se.

I initially asked the question because you referred to the half cock position as a safety in the video. I wondered if that was just a name or if you really treat the gun as if it was truly safe in that configuration. I infer the latter from your answers. I make no judgements or other inferences from that; the question is closed for me.

CraigC
November 8, 2012, 12:22 AM
Which makes what difference exactly?

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