Shoulder stock fitting to a Pietta


PDA






unknwn
November 6, 2012, 07:14 PM
I just received my '51 style of shoulder stock from Cabelas to mount to eligible Pietta BP revolvers.
I'm going to be just a bit cynical and say that "of course" it requires -some- fitting.
Now I have an especially good reason to trim up the grip set of the London that this is going to mate to it ( the grip really needed it anyhow, but now I get to strip and refinish with a Truoil final finish)
The brass will require a bit of relief side-to-side where the casting pinches to either side of the frame AND it seems- some smoothing and clearance around the backstrap and palm area might help me to keep the original finish on the gun intact.
I also expect that I'll take the time to use some of the bottle of Birchwood-Casey Brassblack I bought on the castings of the stock too.
Has anyone out there used that product? and to what satisfaction?
Is there any clear coating on the shoulder stock's brightwerke?
If so,what would you use to clean it off?
I'd also like to learn how others have suceeded in a good fit: What sort of clearance am I looking for in a metal-to-wood & metal-to-metal fitment for a smooth removal/replacement of the stock?
Did anyone use a cushion of any sort between the brass cavity and the backstrap of thier gun? A good quality clear package or bookbinding tape maybe?
I really would like to avoid marring the finishes of the grip and frame during the mounting and removal of the stock.
And finally, is there a "more flush" plug screw for Pietta frames that come with the 1860 type of recoil shield cutaway and those accompanying large screwheads above the triggerguard? I'm going to be ordering a mess of spares and such from Dixie (and VTI) and would like to get some if they exist.

If you enjoyed reading about "Shoulder stock fitting to a Pietta" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Hoof Hearted
November 8, 2012, 11:32 PM
Howdy and congrats on your project! This kind of thing is what makes our hobby so darned exciting........

I'm going to try to help you with this one of your myriad of questions:

I also expect that I'll take the time to use some of the bottle of Birchwood-Casey Brassblack I bought on the castings of the stock too.
Has anyone out there used that product? and to what satisfaction?

The brass may have some wax or polish left fron the factory so I always clean some 3 or 4 aught steel wool (to get the oil out of it) with acetone. Be careful with the acetone around your wood finishes........

Then I go over the brass to be antiqued, fully rubbing, with the steel wool and some acetone slightly burnishing the brass. This will allow the brass black to better react with the brass and you then apply with a swab, rubbing over and over (q-tip works pretty well). After turning it black, I then burnish the black back to a pleasing look with dry (4)0000 steel wool and or some poish depending on how you want it to look.

Good luck and have fun!
HH

unknwn
November 9, 2012, 11:25 AM
HoofHearted,

Thanks for your interest in my project.
From reading here about others method of refinishing thier reproduction guns and such I accumulated a few items yesterday to help me get along with the task. I got a jug of acetone because one of the other members wrote that he had used it to strip the grip panels from his Pietta project rather than trying to sand away any final coating (afraid to lose too much size otherwise).
So far as the shoulder stock is concerned, I am planning on separating the wood from the brass before applying any substances to either component.
I've got a bit of wood/metal matching to do on the shoulder stock also, so it's not like that will constitute much more effort I hadn't already budgeted for anyway.
So far as the brass having some sort of clear coating on it, I have an 1858 Pietta that will be getting some modification to it's triggerguard, and I know for sure that it has a clear coat because there is an obvious sag of that coating on one side of it that I can experiment with the acetone on.

Does Brassblack need any "tooth" scrubbed onto it's surface to prove effective? Or is it like blueing, where the higher the polish, the better and deeper the blueing ends up?
Does the Brassblack lay on the surface or does it penetrate the brass to perform it's magic? Would you know if the finished surface can be scratched, or do you have to gouge the metal to mess up the end result?
There is also a vial of liquid called "Liver of Sulphur" in my antiqueing arsenal that is supposed to darken non-ferrous metals (brass-copper and the like) that I might have to try if the Birchwood-Casey substance proves less than satisfactory. Problem is, I don't know that the "liver" stuff does much more than cause a patina or darkening rather than BLACK which is really what I think I'd prefer.
It seems as if there is enough back-side and hidden areas of the shoulder stocks brass parts for me to experiment on before I goof up somewhere that is really going to show though. I was really looking for someone here that had experience with the Brassblack before I go performing wholesale changes to any of these gun parts.

I'm trying to decide what brand and sort of stain to use on the London's grip panels and the shoulder stock's furniture.
Both examples of wood need "final fitting" of the wood where it is inletted against the metal, so it makes sense to try and stain the pieces to match each other as closely as possible.
I have been entertaining the thought of using an ebony or some other such dark coloration to maybe match the black and very deep blue of the metal of the London's finish.
Is there anyone out there that would counsel against staining it THAT dark?
Suggestions otherwise? And a specific brand/description of stain product would be helpful also.
My intent is to use Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil to finish and protect my wood parts (I've got enough to do every gun I own and then a whole bunch more when I bought it -32oz. of it for $13.99), so using a stain that will be compatible with that product will be required.

Hoof Hearted
November 9, 2012, 01:16 PM
HoofHearted,

Thanks for your interest in my project.
From reading here about others method of refinishing thier reproduction guns and such I accumulated a few items yesterday to help me get along with the task. I got a jug of acetone because one of the other members wrote that he had used it to strip the grip panels from his Pietta project rather than trying to sand away any final coating (afraid to lose too much size otherwise). Citri-Strip brand stripper works pretty well on Pietta's finish.So far as the shoulder stock is concerned, I am planning on separating the wood from the brass before applying any substances to either component.
I've got a bit of wood/metal matching to do on the shoulder stock also, so it's not like that will constitute much more effort I hadn't already budgeted for anyway.
So far as the brass having some sort of clear coating on it, I have an 1858 Pietta that will be getting some modification to it's triggerguard, and I know for sure that it has a clear coat because there is an obvious sag of that coating on one side of it that I can experiment with the acetone on.

Does Brassblack need any "tooth" scrubbed onto it's surface to prove effective? Or is it like blueing, where the higher the polish, the better and deeper the blueing ends up?
No it needs some "porosity" or "tooth" to react well with the brass.Does the Brassblack lay on the surface or does it penetrate the brass to perform it's magic? Would you know if the finished surface can be scratched, or do you have to gouge the metal to mess up the end result?
There is also a vial of liquid called "Liver of Sulphur" in my antiqueing arsenal that is supposed to darken non-ferrous metals (brass-copper and the like) that I might have to try if the Birchwood-Casey substance proves less than satisfactory.
The active ingredient in Brass Black is Liver of Sulphur, I believe. Problem is, I don't know that the "liver" stuff does much more than cause a patina or darkening rather than BLACK which is really what I think I'd prefer.
It seems as if there is enough back-side and hidden areas of the shoulder stocks brass parts for me to experiment on before I goof up somewhere that is really going to show though. I was really looking for someone here that had experience with the Brassblack before I go performing wholesale changes to any of these gun parts.

I'm trying to decide what brand and sort of stain to use on the London's grip panels and the shoulder stock's furniture.
Both examples of wood need "final fitting" of the wood where it is inletted against the metal, so it makes sense to try and stain the pieces to match each other as closely as possible.
I have been entertaining the thought of using an ebony or some other such dark coloration to maybe match the black and very deep blue of the metal of the London's finish.
Is there anyone out there that would counsel against staining it THAT dark?
I would not stain it that dark......JMHOSuggestions otherwise? And a specific brand/description of stain product would be helpful also.
My intent is to use Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil to finish and protect my wood parts (I've got enough to do every gun I own and then a whole bunch more when I bought it -32oz. of it for $13.99), so using a stain that will be compatible with that product will be required.

If you enjoyed reading about "Shoulder stock fitting to a Pietta" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!