“Natural” skill and your limiting factor to becoming a better shot?


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holdencm9
November 7, 2012, 04:07 PM
In another thread I made the comparison of shooting to sports. And shooting is a sport, so that makes sense! But the essence was that you can be excellent by any objective measurement, and still pale in comparison to the pros. However, some people are just “naturals” and others…well, have to work a lot harder. Likewise, some people will NEVER make elite status no matter how much time and money they invest. The common mantra is that with enough time and effort, anyone can reach any level at anything they want, but is that really true? I know it isn’t PC to tell your kids they likely don’t have the chops to go pro in their favorite sport, but it is probably realistic and for the best a lot of times. I don’t think I do myself a disservice by recognizing this.

I think it is safe to say we all feel we could improve our skills, and I definitely know I am steadily improving, but for one reason or another, we are held back. Right now, for me, it is time. I am busy with work and studying and other social endeavors, so I only get to the range every few weeks. If I won the lottery and could dedicate 100% to the shooting sports I would be the happiest guy alive, but still doubt I could reach that top level. And for me personally, that is fine. So I guess you could say motivation is also an issue because I am content to steadily improve and continue besting myself. I consider myself proficient with my carry guns. At some point would like to start in competitions but more for fun and experience than to “compete” per se.

So what about you? What holds you back? The poll is just for curiosity. I am fully aware that there is overlap. For instance, “time = money” and no matter how busy you think you are, you could make time for practice if you had more motivation. Likewise “if I had more money I could probably buy better equipment,” et cetera. Also, please don’t flame me for having a “defeatist” attitude or anything like that. I don’t think it is defeatist to be realistic. And I still strive for improvement all the time. That said, I don't think we should flame anyone who says they just shoot for fun and nothing more.

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aarondhgraham
November 7, 2012, 05:38 PM
I work a normal 8 to 5 workday,,,
Now that daylight savings time has kicked in,,,
There are no more after work range trips for a while.

It's weekends only for me,,,
Unfortunately that's the only time I can get other tasks done.

Aarond

.

Eric M
November 7, 2012, 05:39 PM
I don't have time, money, or equipment. :uhoh:

ZGunner
November 7, 2012, 05:43 PM
I voted money, but time is a killer sometimes too. I just don't have the money for ammo to get out there and shoot as much as I'd like.

I'm not saying if I win the lotto I'm going to be able to be a pro shooter. But if I were able to practice more I'd be better than I am now.

Inebriated
November 7, 2012, 05:46 PM
Like anything else... money.

Steel Horse Rider
November 7, 2012, 05:49 PM
I answered Physical Limitations simply because my distance eyesight isn't what it used to be. I do have a few scoped rifles and one pistol but I prefer to shoot with open (mostly peep) sights. I probably need to get my prescription upgrade but I have trouble seeing a standard target center at 100 yds, which is probably why I enjoy shooting gongs at 300 and 500 yds more than paper targets at 100. Time is the second factor. There are just not enough hours in the day for family, work, cleaning guns, reloading ammo, or shooting......

allaroundhunter
November 7, 2012, 05:50 PM
I'm a poor college kid....

Skribs
November 7, 2012, 06:03 PM
Money and Time are both well up there, not surprising. For me it's kinda both, but while I could find more time to go, I can't find more money, so that's my biggest limiting factor.

Garak
November 7, 2012, 06:06 PM
Bad eyesight and shaky hands limit my accuracy to a certain level. I'm content with it.

Reloadron
November 7, 2012, 06:10 PM
For me it is becoming age. :)

I enjoyed DCM matches for many years but with some added weight and age getting into the positions is not quite as easy as it once was. The visual acuity is also not quite what it once was. While I do shoot a few scoped rifles I always enjoyed iron sights at the 500 meter line in a good tight prone position. Maybe this winter while loading ammunition a few exercises would be in order?

Should be fully retired in a few years so time will not be an issue. :)

Ron

dmancornell
November 7, 2012, 06:10 PM
Physical limitations. Hand tremors messes with handguns. Poor eyesight makes iron sights difficult for rifles. I've been able to shoot scoped rifles fairly decently.

mljdeckard
November 7, 2012, 06:10 PM
for me, it has ALWAYS been money. I will admit that I have learned good money habits the hard way over the years. Now I have a monthy budget of $100 for ammo, I started reloading to make the most of it. (Just hand-counted 1167 9mm and 671 .45s currently primed, belled, and waiting for bullets.)

MrDig
November 7, 2012, 06:11 PM
Takes time and money

forindooruseonly
November 7, 2012, 06:39 PM
A degenerative eye disease limits my ability to shoot. I can still shoot alright, but I'll never be a 2600+ bullseye shooter like my dad. Kinda bummed me out, because he was very supportive of me competing and it was a goal of mine to be that good, but that's life.

Strangely, it's one of the things that has pushed me more into collecting and admiring the aesthetic side of firearms.

huntsman
November 7, 2012, 06:47 PM
Motivation as in lack of

happygeek
November 7, 2012, 07:11 PM
The OP is missing one important question, which specific shooting sport are you talking about? NRA Highpower? 3 Gun? Cowboy Action? IDPA?

I only pay $90 a year for range membership, but this is at a range where no rapid fire is allowed and certainly no shooting on the move, so 3 Gun practice is out. They do have IDPA pits and I could and do practice NRA Highpower style shooting. If I wanted to get into something like 3 Gun I don't even know of a range that allows it, and don't even want to know how much it'd cost. So I have to settle for only doing 3 Gun style stuff at work where it's free and the range allows it.

Apparently there are rifle ranges out there that don't allow shooting from anywhere but the bench, so for some people even NRA Highpower is out.

Warp
November 7, 2012, 07:31 PM
I voted other/multiple:

Money (for training classes and ammo, mostly)
Time (for traveling to classes)
Equipment (counting the range as equipment, don't have proper range access for many things locally)

BCRider
November 7, 2012, 08:10 PM
I voted that I'm perfect just for the helluva it... :D

I'm not sure about rifles yet but I do know that for me good handgun skills are very much a perishable skill. If I don't shoot about once a week I do notice a downturn in results. More often than that over a few weeks and my skills ramp up. Once to twice a week and they stay about the same.

I include my matches for various styles as part of my weekly shooting.

The_Next_Generation
November 7, 2012, 08:15 PM
+1 for being a broke college kid!

Which means no time, AND no money :banghead:

holdencm9
November 7, 2012, 08:22 PM
The OP is missing one important question, which specific shooting sport are you talking about? NRA Highpower? 3 Gun? Cowboy Action? IDPA?

I intentionally left it open, and put it in "General Gun Discussions" to garner more responses and overall I figure that no matter what shooting sport you want to get good at, it will take time and money and dedication to get there.

+1 for being a broke college kid!

I hear ya! I think I shot about 10 mags through my Beretta my entire college career.

I voted that I'm perfect just for the helluva it...

I figured that would snag a few votes :)

Stress_Test
November 7, 2012, 09:44 PM
I've got shaky hands so it's kinda hard to make bullseye shots when the front sight is dancing all over the target! :rolleyes:

I'm glad to see I'm not the only one here with shaky hands though. It's not an age thing (30s) or physical problem per se, my hands have just always tended to shake. More so when I'm fatigued, excited, etc.

Twiki357
November 8, 2012, 12:08 AM
You didn't list range access, so I'm an "Other". Only two local ranges. One range close to me is a private club, but open to the public. But half the time it's closed to the public for a competition, preparation, clean up, maintenance, or whatever. The other range is a 180 mile round trip.

Bobson
November 8, 2012, 12:21 AM
Its time for me as well. I work full time, on second shift, over an hour from home. That leaves very little time to spend with the family as it is, but I'm also a full time college student, with most of my classes being on one of my two days off. My other day off is for church and dedicated family time. When its all said and done, I take the time to hit the range about an hour or two per month - and even then, its hard not to feel guilty doing that instead of spending the time with my wife and daughter.

tacxted
November 8, 2012, 12:24 AM
For me my limiting factor is time, money second. I can practice all day by dry firing, but there is only so much sunlight each day.

1911 guy
November 8, 2012, 01:42 AM
Time and money. I've got a family, work all the overtime I can get (which isn't much lately) and spend most of my time and money with and on my family. I spend enough of shooting to stay proficient, but I'm not fooling myself into thinking I'm getting any better right now.

However, I'm planning on another class in 2013, so maybe that'll help me get back on my game a little.

Nugilum
November 8, 2012, 02:30 AM
My limitation is the mid-age eyes and the "family twitch" (aka essential tremors) :(

Ramone
November 8, 2012, 07:45 AM
at 49 years, I am hitting my limits. I can still get under 1 MOA, but I need stronger scopes than I did 10 years ago, and settling into a position is starting to involve groans and creaking. Iron sights are behind me, and while my pistol is still inside 3 inches at 10 yards, the groups are not as neat as they used to be.

holdencm9
November 8, 2012, 12:12 PM
Some interesting replies so far and results to the poll.

I guess it comes as no surprise that time is the leading contributor. Life is pretty busy! I was a little surprised that physical is coming in second, but I guess it makes sense. For a lot of people, by the time they are old enough and established at their career, kids grown up, or maybe even retired, is the time they get to shoot more, but also the time at which vision and such start to go south.

Strangely, it's one of the things that has pushed me more into collecting and admiring the aesthetic side of firearms.

Sorry to hear about your eye disease, but I am glad you can at least enjoy shooting. A friend of my dad's is entirely blind so can't shoot, but still collects firearms. It puzzled me at first, but if you think of the mechanical touch and feel of firearms, all the different materials and textures, the history behind each type, and the cool sounds they make when cycling the action and stuff, it makes perfect sense.

I've got shaky hands so it's kinda hard to make bullseye shots when the front sight is dancing all over the target!

I never considered myself to have the steady hands of a surgeon, usually my shakiness is due to caffeine though (or lack thereof). :) But it also does make me wonder if there is a gene or something that gives people incredibly steady hands. Maybe a higher concentration of slow-twitch muscles or something? I have heard women are naturally better shots because of this, have no idea if this is true or not (I think they are better students though, because they have fewer preconceived ideas and smaller egos).

You didn't list range access, so I'm an "Other". Only two local ranges. One range close to me is a private club, but open to the public. But half the time it's closed to the public for a competition, preparation, clean up, maintenance, or whatever. The other range is a 180 mile round trip.

That is tough! I guess it would fall under time and money. Even if you had time to make the trip, the gas would make you go broke!

Thanks for the responses so far everyone.

HoosierQ
November 8, 2012, 12:26 PM
I said Time. This sort of poll is not quite as good as one in which respondents can pick multiple options...but that of course was not available to you.

Money is second for me.

Let's face it, physical limitations should be divided into two. Physical limitations that might make getting to the range or out in the woods challenging vs my "physical limitiation": eyesight. I have a condition called EBMD and/or ABMD which is basically moving wrinkles in the cornea. Right now, my right eye won't focus to beyond a blurry state no matter what I do. In a month or so, the wrinkle will have moved and with glasses I'll be fine.

Spartacus
November 8, 2012, 03:24 PM
Time. I'm a new father. I can tell you that nothing has ever cut into my range time like my beautiful baby girl and you'll never hear me complain.

chicharrones
November 8, 2012, 11:04 PM
Eyes and money.

Smokin Gator
November 8, 2012, 11:22 PM
I think that for more of us then we would like to admit, a lot of it is motivation. I recently shot a revolver match with a master classified shooter on our squad. He shot a plate rack through a window from a position on the stage that was much farther than if you shot it at the end of the stage. He knocked them right down one after the other, no problem. I was standing by his buddy who commented that in addition to other practice, he said the shooter does dry fire drills for 1 hour, every day.

Also, you've all probably seen examples of guys who get into competition, and decide they really want to get better, a lot better. They find out what kind of a practice regimen it would take to really do it right. And then they proceed to follow their plan and you see one of these shooters who is a Master level shooter a year later. It's not easy or common, but some people make it a priority and get it done.

Even with limited time available, many of us, if determined, could improve a lot faster than we do. You do have to have enough money to at least get some equipment and ammunition. But a lot of top shooters do a lot of dry fire practicing. A lot of us find the time to get to a couple of monthly matches and several bigger matches throughout the year, with occasional practice sessions in between. I get to the range and practice some, but it's still not the focused, with a particular purpose, that a really dedicated shooter would do. Mark

holdencm9
November 8, 2012, 11:51 PM
I think that for more of us then we would like to admit, a lot of it is motivation.

Smokin' Gator, great response. I totally agree.

I could do a lot more dry fire practice if I had the motivation. Sometimes when I get home from work I just want to eat dinner and veg in front of the TV with my wife and a beer. To be honest, I could probably get to the range more if I really wanted, but I choose to allocate more time (and money) to family and friends. I like catching a game or grabbing a drink or going to a movie. I guess now that I have reached what I consider 'adequate' proficiency for defense and to frankly be better than all my friends, I am more content, even though I still want to continuously improve, the immediate urgency is not there. It is still mostly for fun after all.

forindooruseonly
November 9, 2012, 12:20 AM
Sorry to hear about your eye disease, but I am glad you can at least enjoy shooting. A friend of my dad's is entirely blind so can't shoot, but still collects firearms. It puzzled me at first, but if you think of the mechanical touch and feel of firearms, all the different materials and textures, the history behind each type, and the cool sounds they make when cycling the action and stuff, it makes perfect sense.

Thank you, I'm very grateful that I can still participate in shooting sports among other things. It's funny how protective I am of my eyes, and how annoyed I get when I see people with perfect vision taking it for granted. Oh well. It's interesting about the blind gentleman collecting guns - I can relate to that attraction for mechanical aspects, the craftsmenship behind it, and the history too. Thinking of it, you're completely right, most of my guns have a variety of textures and materials, ranging from engraving to roll stamps to checkering. It would be an interesting object to feel and not see. I could probably learn a thing or two from that gentleman.. I bet he has a unique understanding of firearms.

HDCamel
November 9, 2012, 12:34 AM
Hard Work and Guts can overcome any obstacle.

I think a lot of concerns over natural ability are really just people who are too focused on what they're supposed to be doing and not experimenting to find what works best (as in, most naturally) for them. You need to find your own way rather than just drinking the "thumbs-forward, isosceles stance" Kool-Aid.

Once you find what works best for you, all you need is practice and you'll be as good as anyone.

Ignition Override
November 9, 2012, 12:48 AM
Primarily it's motivation, but also lack of continuous instruction.
Bench shooting doesn't drive me much, compared to blowing up a piece of concrete block (or sinking a bottle) with an orange blob sprayed on, which is fun.

jim243
November 9, 2012, 01:22 AM
Time and money. I've got a family, work all the overtime I can get (which isn't much lately) and spend most of my time and money with and on my family. I spend enough of shooting to stay proficient, but I'm not fooling myself into thinking I'm getting any better right now.

Ditto, hit the nail right on the head.

Jim

FROGO207
November 9, 2012, 06:59 AM
First and foremost I think in my instance time and money are interchangeable. It seems if I have the cash it is because I work all the time and no time to play. Or time to play and no funds to do so.:banghead:

We recently had a demo by a blind shooter who had special targets (squares instead of circles) and a camera/sensor setup. He shot a better group at 50 YDS than I could.:eek::) He does need help with everything but I can see that being blind does not stop one from shooting thank goodness.

Dunkelheit
November 9, 2012, 07:03 AM
i voted time.

I own to much guns to shoot them all perfect. ;)

Zumet
November 9, 2012, 07:51 AM
back when I had money,, I didn't have time.. now I got the time and no money!!!! I used to own a small farm with plenty of land to step outside (some times simply open a window up in the reloading room) and try a new load or simply keep my eye hand coordination up. now I own more land but its bordered on three sides by people, so to be safe I have to go to the F&G range, thats 10 miles away so I'm limited.

Queen_of_Thunder
November 9, 2012, 08:25 AM
For me its money and physical limitations. I shoot USPSA but my physical limitations means I will never get far in that sport. ATA has a chair division which is great as thats where I'm headed. That and bench rest are in my future. Thats whats great about the shooting sports as it has a format for shooters from the run and gun type to the sit down and shoot bunch.

303tom
November 9, 2012, 02:30 PM
Well I see their are 7 of us that are perfect..............ROTFLMAO.

blahpony
November 9, 2012, 03:10 PM
I voted motivation. I shoot 9mm pistols, so ammo isn't too expensive. The range is about a mile from work so time isn't an issue.
Motivation is my main issue in that I have to get my range bag together and unload my HD pistols in the morning before leaving for work.
The range is only about 15 minutes from my house. Though, if I get home I generally will want to stay there for a while before doing anything. By then, the range will be closed.

PonyKiller
November 9, 2012, 08:42 PM
i voted for physicall. in the end that's what it is, time and money are limiting factors.. but i have a bum left shoulder turning quickly into a completely locked up left shoulder. I can't turn my left palm up at all so i'm limited to pulling in on a strap. all things considered i do pretty well with it. i'm hunting accurate, about 2-3" from a sitting position at a hundred. so that's good enough for now till the shoulder gets taken care of.

ColtPythonElite
November 9, 2012, 08:49 PM
I have enough time and motivation to shoot 2+ days a week. I also have enough money that I don't have to ration ammo and enough to buy decent equipment. I also am in pretty good shape and have good vision. Being middle aged, I don't think my skills will get any better than they are right now, though...I reckon I have peaked.:D

huntsman
November 11, 2012, 07:37 PM
I reckon I have peaked.

Me too, I can only hope the trip down is long and slow but one never knows so I keep my SXS for when regulated to rocking chair status. :)

WoodchuckAssassin
November 11, 2012, 07:48 PM
Money...with Time being a close second.

Right now i can only afford 2 range visits a month, and even then I'm only getting out my handguns (the range is indoor, and only 25 yards long). And of course I blow all my ammo when I do go, so that opens up a whole other can of worms!

Hardtarget
November 12, 2012, 12:12 AM
I'm in a physical limitations group. As with others its mostly age...vision to be exact. I never was a great shot but as my vision got poorer so did my marksmanship. Handgun is most noticable. It is hard to stay in the "sweet spot" with my glasses. I've found that peep sights help greatly on rifle. I don't have a scoped rifle except for the .22 I keep from my father in law. I rarely shoot it...my grandson likes it very well.

No doubt, money is a factor along with time. Seems life has gotten faster and days are shorter. Too many things pull on your time to the point of almost no free time. Oh well.

Mark

Pete D.
November 12, 2012, 05:25 AM
Motivation, sort of. My problem is, as one of my shooting buddies tells me, is that I am interested in too many things. Maybe "focus" is a better term. I like to shoot pistols and do about 30 matches a year. But....I also like Trap shooting and do that once or twice a week when I could be practicing with the pistol. I like smallbore prone match shooting; that has had me turn my attention to HP Service rifle.
I just bought a new bow - one of the Asian horsebows - and find myself at the archery range instead of at the pistol range.
Heck, I like anything that shoots.....carry one of a dozen or so slingshots that I have in my pocket when I am outside....and a pocket full of marbles - buy'em by the case.
and then theres....

Pete

beatledog7
November 12, 2012, 09:22 AM
For me, it's time or money. When I have time it's because I'm between contracts and have to be careful about money. When I have money it's because I'm on contract and have less free time.

Eyesight is an issue for lots of us as we get older. I doubt that equipment limits very many people. It certainly doesn't limit me.

mavracer
November 12, 2012, 09:38 AM
In the words of Harry Callahan "A man's gotta know his limitations"
I know in my case time, money and motivation all work together to keep me from finding my physical limitations.

Clipper
November 12, 2012, 02:46 PM
The biggest factor for me has been age and somewhat poorer health... I once brought a RBH I hadn't shot in 5 years to a gathering and had no problems potting the end of a 3-lb coffee can standing offhand @ 50 yards. Today my lessened visual accuity won't allow it. Iron sights are slowly giving way to optical sights. Older muscles aren't as steady as they used to be. Heart disease, diabetes and cancer treatment ( though mild and effective ) all take their tolls... I'm just happy to still be able to achieve passable hunting accuracy, but like my dad, there will likely come a day when I'll pretty much have to face such an erosion of skills and ability that even S.D. will be an issue.

zdc1775
November 12, 2012, 03:22 PM
I voted Other or Multiple.
Time: I work 7-3 and live an hour from work and the range is an hour past that
Money: Just bought a new house so I'm on a tight budget right now of about $150 a month of discrecionary funds
Physical Limitations: Bad Knee keeps me from getting into a good tight sitting or kneeling position, bad eyes keep me from seeing the target very well, and bad back keeps me from doing a whole lot of stuff I used to.

rugerman
November 12, 2012, 07:04 PM
I put physical limitations due to my arthritis that now limits my dexterity and hand strength. I used to shoot lots of magnum handgun, now I have trouble with even .357 mag. I still do pretty well with 9mm & 22 and rifles but the 44mag, 41 mag and hot 45 long colt, and even 45 acp hurt after just a few rounds. Getting old is not for sissies.

tobenheim
November 12, 2012, 07:58 PM
I put time as my primary limitation. My wife had a stroke last year at the age of 38 and I am now her primary caregiver. Used to be the money was the major limitation until I got into .22. Now I can shoot quite a bit of ammo without blowing the budget and improve my fundamentals.

Jaxondog
November 12, 2012, 09:28 PM
Well I voted I was perfect and could not get any better because it was the only one that fit. I have plenty of time, [retired], I have the best equipment and money is not a factor. I reload so I have enough to shoot every day til the day I pass away and then some. I guess if anything at all hold's me back, would probably be knowing I have to clean them afterward's. There has been several time's I have gotten all set up to shoot just to say; the heck with it. I don't feel like cleaning them so I put everything back up and go do something else.

holdencm9
November 12, 2012, 09:46 PM
There has been several time's I have gotten all set up to shoot just to say; the heck with it. I don't feel like cleaning them so I put everything back up and go do something else.

Lol. Well that sounds like "motivation" to me :)

One thing that surprises me is the amount of "physical limitations" responses. It both saddens and inspires me though. On the one hand, you have to acknowledge your limits and accept challenges you face. I will not take for granted my health, but at the same time, it is great to know that shooting can be a lifelong and very enjoyable hobby regardless of most physical ailments. Thanks everyone!

Dave P.
November 12, 2012, 11:48 PM
Other....
People are NOT created equal.
Some people given time, money and motivation will get to be pretty good
at something.....pretty good.
At the pointy end of any sport are the very few out of all those who really
tried, for what ever reason those few are just better.
And then there's "the one" who at that point in time in their particular
sport/event are just better than everybody else.
For most of the population to get to be "pretty good" is a major
undertaking. I've worked pretty hard at some sports when I was
younger....never got to the "pretty good" stage.
I think I lacked talent.
Dave

holdencm9
November 13, 2012, 10:09 AM
Dave P, you have touched on an aspect of the discussion I had initially wanted to be involved, but sort of fell by the wayside.

That is, can anyone barring physical limitations really achieve any level of proficiency they desire, assuming they have all the time, money and motivation in the world?

My heart says yes but my brain says no. I understand theoretically all it is is sight picture and trigger control, but if it were so simple, I should be better! :banghead: And there has to be a reason the top tiers of competitiveness are so out-of-reach for the average joe. I have no doubt that they work harder to get where they are, but they must also have an inherent natural skill that enables them to gain the motivation to pursue such elite levels. In other words, people don't pursue those avenues unless they realize (or are often told, by a coach or someone) that they are pretty darn good. Meanwhile the rest of us are just content to continuously improve and beat personal records. :)

Ankeny
November 14, 2012, 07:07 PM
Motivation. When I am motivated to accomplish a shooting goal, I will make the time and come up with the money.

Corpral_Agarn
November 16, 2012, 05:35 PM
For me its the money then the time.

I recently go married and I don't reload yet so it gets expensive.

45_auto
November 16, 2012, 06:08 PM
That is, can anyone barring physical limitations really achieve any level of proficiency they desire, assuming they have all the time, money and motivation in the world?

No. There is a degree of talent involved. It's easy to become MUCH better than average, but if you desire to be within the top handful of anything in the world, it'll take a certain amount of God-given talent that you don't have any control over. Either you have it or you don't.

Bovice
November 16, 2012, 06:16 PM
I'm pretty awesome as it is, so....

I used to shoot much more than I do now. Now I work most of the day, with much of what happens at work on my mind when I go home too. Then I've got my girlfriend to spend time with, and there's not much opportunity left. That's life though. Never enough time.

45_auto
November 16, 2012, 07:52 PM
I'm pretty awesome as it is

This is the internet. Everyone is more awesome than you.

Centurian22
November 16, 2012, 10:33 PM
Voted multiple:
Time: work, family and to do lists.
Money: for ammo, training, accessories and equipment.

Shoot66
November 16, 2012, 10:39 PM
Time, time and then time.
As the second, a longer range.

coalman
November 18, 2012, 01:20 AM
You cannot exceed your innate potential. Period.

Ankeny
November 18, 2012, 06:31 PM
You cannot exceed your innate potential. Period. Precious few will ever realize their potential. Period.:D

Hit_Factor
November 18, 2012, 06:47 PM
I guess time is my limiting factor. As the years pass I weigh more, my eyesight deteriorates, my knuckles ache from arthritis especially when it's cold out. But I seldom miss a match.


Sent by someone using something.

CountryUgly
November 18, 2012, 06:48 PM
If I hadn't had broken so much vital stuff when I was younger I'd probably be a better shot than I am today so I had to go with physical limitations. With that being said I'm still a pretty good shot :)

Steel Talon
November 18, 2012, 07:09 PM
Myself, in my younger days I was an accomplished rifleman and hand gunner, perfect practice made perfect. However as I aged and genetics kicked in (neuro -muscular degeneration) it’s slowly robbed my abilities.

I still shoot, but no longer compete, instead of being rock solid in form you can now see a bit of tremble in my front sight.

I believe the key to a "good shooter" is ability to concentrate on task, control your respiratory system, and repeat action over and over again. You need to be in relative descent shape, have good eyesight, and have some descent equipment.

C96
November 18, 2012, 07:28 PM
I voted "other" because I think training/instruction is the most important. Practicing bad habits won't do very much. I used to shoot Bullseye and later Benchrest. I had good equipment but it took a lot of practice AFTER good instruction that I made real progress.

A good instructor can help eliminate mistakes and show you best techniques to use with your equipment. And making real improvement makes any shooting more enjoyable.

allan

bldsmith
November 18, 2012, 11:06 PM
For me it is Time Money and Equipment. When I go I am pretty decent, If I could go once a week I would be much better.

russ69
November 19, 2012, 12:52 AM
...That is, can anyone barring physical limitations really achieve any level of proficiency they desire, assuming they have all the time, money and motivation in the world? ...

Can a jockey be a football lineman? The obvious answer is no, not everybody can be what they want or achieve the level of proficiency they want. There are people that excel at certain tasks. Do all the Little League kids make the major league? How about triple A ball players, they have the motivation and the time?
I raced gokarts for many years. We put 5 and 6 year old kids in the gokart school and after about 20 laps we can tell who is going to be a champion and who doesn't have a chance. There is a natural talent involved. We don't know the parameters, or we would test for it but putting the kid in the kart we can tell right away who is going to be fast.
Work hard and accept the talent you have. You can be a way above average shooter with practice but you may never win a match in your lifetime. That is life.

dataDyne
November 19, 2012, 03:55 PM
I vote equipment since practically no one makes things the way i like them

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