Most advanced handgun and bio-engineering


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winfried
November 8, 2012, 12:27 PM
I have come across some good advice and information from a knowledgeable person/designer on the following. Should I buy a pistol designed by this knowledgeable person? Have you bought such a pistol?

Thanks in advance

WAH

That pistols were complicated to use.

'To Load a pistol the slide must be pulled back and pushed forward.'

'When a 'clip is empty', the slide must be pulled back, a new clip be inserted, then the slide released and moved forward.'

'These actions must be carried out against heavy spring forces and only in one sequence and can be entrusted to experienced hands.'

'The shooter cannot often tell whether the pistol is on or off safety, especially after a pause in shooting.'

'A trigger-type automatic (I am puzzled what that is, I though all pistols have a trigger) has a trigger that is cocked by the slide when a cartridge is chambered. In order to carry the loaded pistol, safely, the hammer must be uncocked.'

'Subsequent shooting requires manually cocking of the hammer by means of the trigger.'

'This procedure requires that quite some force be exerted .necessitating a long trigger stroke. The pistol is off safety after the first shot, and subsequent shots only require limited force on and a limited stroke of the trigger, so that the danger of an unintentional shot is great.'

'For safety against jarring and dropping a particular latch for the firing pin is provided that is released on operation of the trigger before the hammer strikes the firing pin.'

'And then there are pistols known, that have a separate safety to be operated with three fingers gripping the pistol grip, but it is difficult to operate the safety independently of the trigger finger so that mistakes in handling happen.
In addition , with such a pistol whenever it is solidly gripped it is off safety so that unintentional shots can be fired.'

'Another problem with known automatic pistols is that removal of the barrel for servicing the gun s fairly difficult, necessitating tools. In view of the need to maintain such complicated mechanism carefully, such difficulty is extremely disadvantageous.'

'Yet another disadvantage of the known automatic pistols is that after the last shot in a clip the slide returns forward on an empty chamber . To chamber a new cartridge it is necessary to pull back the slide , insert a new clip , then advance the slide. In a situation where a pistol is used , such extra handling is very disadvantageous.'

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Certaindeaf
November 8, 2012, 12:37 PM
Does this pistol have a name or is it a one-off?

Owen
November 8, 2012, 12:49 PM
This does not sound like a modern handgun at all.

Certaindeaf
November 8, 2012, 12:56 PM
Where the heck does "bio-engineering" come into play or have anything to do with anything?

Maybe start over and rephrase the question, if indeed it was a question. Try to not be so verbose and boil it down to bones or something.

Sam1911
November 8, 2012, 01:17 PM
This sounds like a very long-winded way of explaining the way quite a few semi-automatic handguns work, but not the more modern designs.

Let's break this down:

'To Load a pistol the slide must be pulled back and pushed forward.'Well, that's generally how almost every semi-automatic firearm works. Except that none require you to push the slide forward again. The recoil spring will do that for you. You simply have to retract the slide slightly and let it go, or just press the slide stop/release lever down.

'When a 'clip is empty', the slide must be pulled back, a new clip be inserted, then the slide released and moved forward.'There are a few styles of automatic handgun that do not lock open after the last shot is fired, but not many. Most will lock the slide back when the magazine is empty.

'These actions must be carried out against heavy spring forces and only in one sequence and can be entrusted to experienced hands.'Hmmm...not sure what to say to that. You need to understand how the pistol works to make it function, but 5 minutes of practice is enough to get the point across.

'The shooter cannot often tell whether the pistol is on or off safety, especially after a pause in shooting.'Not knowing anything about this gun, I don't even know if it has a safety or a decocking lever or not. Once you understand how a gun works it is very easy to quickly tell if it is on-safe or off-safe. If you've just fired it and didn't apply the safety, it's still off-safe.

'A trigger-type automatic (I am puzzled what that is, I though all pistols have a trigger) has a trigger that is cocked by the slide when a cartridge is chambered. In order to carry the loaded pistol, safely, the hammer must be uncocked.'This is just poor use of the words. He's describing what we call a "Double/Single-Action" automatic. And he's saying that once the gun is charged (a round is placed in the chamber) the hammer must be lowered to make the gun safe to carry. There is (usually) no separate safety to apply. Most guns of that type have a "decocking" lever that will safely drop the hammer without firing the gun. Then the first shot you take has a long, heavy pull because the trigger is cocking the hammer as you pull, not just releasing an already cocked hammer.

'Subsequent shooting requires manually cocking of the hammer by means of the trigger.'Now this sounds more like what we'd call a "Double-Action-Only" handgun, where the hammer does not stay cocked when the slide cycles, but is lowered back onto a safety notch after every shot. Every shot you take requires a long, heavy trigger pull to cock the hammer and let it fall. A very few guns are made this way. Most are small pocket automatics designed to be very, very simple to use, needing no safety and no decocking lever. Just pull the trigger and the gun goes bang -- like a double-action revolver.

'This procedure requires that quite some force be exerted .necessitating a long trigger stroke. The pistol is off safety after the first shot, and subsequent shots only require limited force on and a limited stroke of the trigger, so that the danger of an unintentional shot is great.'And now he's back to describing a "Double Action/Single Action" pistol where the trigger pull on the first shot is long and heavy, but the next shots are all short and light pulls, until the shooter decocks the gun to make it "safe" again.

'For safety against jarring and dropping a particular latch for the firing pin is provided that is released on operation of the trigger before the hammer strikes the firing pin.'Almost every modern handgun has some form of internal safety mechanism that keeps it from firing if dropped or jarred.

'And then there are pistols known, that have a separate safety to be operated with three fingers gripping the pistol grip, but it is difficult to operate the safety independently of the trigger finger so that mistakes in handling happen. In addition , with such a pistol whenever it is solidly gripped it is off safety so that unintentional shots can be fired.'There is only one gun I can think of that operates this way -- the H&K P7. They are VERY nice firearms, and not at all unsafe. But they are also heavy, expensive, and rare these days. They are a bit of an evolutionary dead end in handgun development.

'Another problem with known automatic pistols is that removal of the barrel for servicing the gun s fairly difficult, necessitating tools. In view of the need to maintain such complicated mechanism carefully, such difficulty is extremely disadvantageous.'Almost no common service type handguns require any tools to remove the barrel for cleaning. Almost NONE. So that's just untrue.

'Yet another disadvantage of the known automatic pistols is that after the last shot in a clip the slide returns forward on an empty chamber . To chamber a new cartridge it is necessary to pull back the slide , insert a new clip , then advance the slide. In a situation where a pistol is used , such extra handling is very disadvantageous.'We already covered this one. Only a very few (usually small and cheap) handguns do not lock back the slide when the magazine is empty. Almost every automatic handgun locks open after the last shot.

Seems like whomever wrote this doesn't know a whole lot about firearms.

Skribs
November 8, 2012, 01:30 PM
Sam kinda touched on this, but it's also called a "magazine", not a "clip", just to add to the level of questionability in this person's firearm knowledge. I'm curious to as to:

1) What does "bio-engineering" have to do?
2) What is the actual pistol?
3) How do you explain the inconsistensies between the DA/SA and DAO mechanisms that are described at different points?
4) Are there pictures of this?

That said, just because someone doesn't use the right nomenclature doesn't mean they're wrong. Einstein had to go back to school to learn the correct syntax for writing his theories. Even so, this sounds like some weird DA/SA - DAO hybrid with a P7 safety.

Jim Watson
November 8, 2012, 01:44 PM
I do not consider the quotes to indicate much knowledge at all.
Perhaps the author is promoting sale of his own design and has to make up straw man arguments against the competition.
But since you are keeping his identity and the brand of weapon secret, we cannot discuss that any further.

And furthermore, the usage indicates that it was either written by somebody not very fluent in English or awkwardly translated from some other language.

fatcat4620
November 8, 2012, 02:03 PM
Sounds like someone from 1895 describing early automatics.

Owen
November 8, 2012, 04:44 PM
I think we also must consider that the OP is not a native english speaker, so let's take it easy about criticising his language. I'm sure he's more fluent in our language than we are in his...

9mmepiphany
November 8, 2012, 04:59 PM
The pistol that first came to mind when I read bio-engineering was the Vektor CP-1

http://www.e-gun.net/guns/20198-1.jpg

Jim Watson
November 8, 2012, 04:59 PM
Ah, got it. German Southwest Africa, now known as Namibia.
Might have been translated from German, wiki says it is the more common language although English is official.
I note that winifred's introduction is correct English.

But lacking anything but the designer's claims, I still can't pronounce on the gun's desirability.

Skribs
November 8, 2012, 05:05 PM
9mm, care to say why you connect it to bioengineering?

Never heard of it before, makes sense its been used in sci-fi shows/movies from the looks of it, though. And it's from South Africa, which puts it close to the OP.

CPshooter
November 8, 2012, 05:14 PM
OP must be trying to describe Bond's new Walther in the new 007 movie. :-)

Certaindeaf
November 8, 2012, 05:27 PM
Sounds like someone is trying to scare him long-hand style away from semi-auto's or something.

tightgroup tiger
November 8, 2012, 06:37 PM
That or he's hedging around not telling us something.

Try again.

9mmepiphany
November 8, 2012, 07:19 PM
9mm, care to say why you connect it to bioengineering?

Never heard of it before, makes sense its been used in sci-fi shows/movies from the looks of it, though. And it's from South Africa, which puts it close to the OP.
The CP-1 is actually quite a basic pistol.

What made it unusual is that the company took it to a college design class and let them design the exterior to optimally work with the human hand.

It is along the lines of Nikon having the body of the F4/5 designed by the same designer who did the Lotus Esprit and the Beretta 90-Two

Skribs
November 8, 2012, 08:14 PM
What made it unusual is that the company took it to a college design class and let them design the exterior to optimally work with the human hand.

A human hand or the human hand? I ask that because of how hard it is to find gloves that fit both my palm and fingers comfortably.

Jaymo
November 8, 2012, 08:27 PM
Skribs. You have that problem, too? My hands are large width and thickness, but my fingers are medium length.

AJumbo
November 8, 2012, 09:32 PM
Winfried- I say go ahead and buy the pistol, but don't buy anything else this guy ever wrote. His descriptions are downright hazardous!

9mmepiphany
November 8, 2012, 11:34 PM
A human hand or the human hand?
You'd have to ask the manufacturer who provided the class with the specs

winfried
November 9, 2012, 04:48 AM
Hi, read it carefully! One hand holds the pistol, one hand pulls the slide back and holds it open and the third hand changes the clip. That is where bioengineering comes in, or a second person to lend you a hand.

I could not think of any modern pistol that requires tools to strip.

The originator of that paper seems to believe that he created the FIRST MODERN HANDGUN. It was non other than Mr. Gaston Glock in a 1988 patent application.
No wonder the blow up, no wonder they cant get the hardening right. No wonder they need retrofits extensively and it must be the only pistol in the world for which a term of a particular malfunction was coined.
I am glad I do not own a Glock. I hope you enjoy your glock.

The PDF attachment is the same text with my snotty comments added in italics and high-lighted.

Regards

WAH

leadcounsel
November 9, 2012, 05:15 AM
To use my slender 5 digit hand extensions, I will methodically press the lettered squares, "keys" if you will, on my flat surface. In turn, pressing these "keys" will produce corresponding symbols, or "letters." These letters, when put together, form "words" and, in the correct order, sentences. These ideas are decoded and recoded, and transmitted using electrods. Others can read this on their own square devices.

Sam1911
November 9, 2012, 07:04 AM
I think it's pretty well known that G. Glock wasn't a gun guru when he designed his pistol. And a bad translation from German would explain some of the strange syntax.

It kind of doesn't matter what anyone -- including the inventor -- said about the Glock pistol or any other pistols way back then. If they didn't work very well for a great number of people, they wouldn't be where they are in the competition world. Or the duty gun world, either.

Certaindeaf
November 9, 2012, 07:37 AM
Well that'll learn us. We'd make poor middle-school teachers.. shoulda cut and pasted part of that into a search engine for a "match".. yep, there it is.

Yea, German syntax/convention is all catywompus to ours.. so I hear.

beatledog7
November 9, 2012, 08:42 AM
Does the location from which someone posts, or lists as his location in his profile, indicate what that person's native language is? Over my career, assuming I changed my profile to indicate my physical location, I might have posted to THR from a dozen different countries in which English is not the official or most commonly spoken/written language, but my native language is English.

I do own a Glock, but the one I have has little in common with the description in the OP. Thanks, though, Winfried, for the morning's entertainment. Most original Glock-bashing post I've seen on THR.

Certaindeaf
November 9, 2012, 09:13 AM
I was referring to a search leading one to Gaston.

Guillermo
November 9, 2012, 09:27 AM
sounds like a translation issue

Skribs
November 9, 2012, 04:47 PM
Ah, this appears to be what Glock is saying about other pistols, not his. That other pistols are difficult to use because of excessive controls.

I had thought this was all trying to describe one pistol.

winfried
November 10, 2012, 06:31 AM
Does the location from which someone posts, or lists as his location in his profile, indicate what that person's native language is? Over my career, assuming I changed my profile to indicate my physical location, I might have posted to THR from a dozen different countries in which English is not the official or most commonly spoken/written language, but my native language is English.

I do own a Glock, but the one I have has little in common with the description in the OP. Thanks, though, Winfried, for the morning's entertainment. Most original Glock-bashing post I've seen on THR.
I do not see it as glock bashing, I have posted unaltered extracts from 1988 US Patent 4.825.744
I have on record 90 total failures of Glock pistols. Some of them resulted in injuries to hands.

I have blown up a high power, other than grips coming off and all magazine parts blown out the bottom nothing else happened.

For the record, a barrel having a yield strength of only60kg/mm^2 and a chamber wall of 3mm would need about 10500 bar (about three times max pressure of a rifle cartridge) to split the chamber, but such pressure is neigh impossible with a small capacity 9mm shell.
That is why all split chambers are not just the result of overloads, but of the hardening process which Glock claims to have pioneered. Nitrite hardening known under various names was developed to prevent burning valves of high-performance engines. The process makes steel hard and the hardness depends on the exact method, but unlike the hardening and tempering process of carbon steel it is not possible to have full control over the desired hardness.
From an engineering point, Glocks have many faults, but few people are engineers.

Regards

WAH

Sam1911
November 10, 2012, 07:44 AM
Ninety? Wow, that's a lot. Well, on the other hand, Glock (well, all Austrian handgun manufacturers together, so take out a few hundred Steyrs from these numbers) exported over 400,000 handguns to the US in 2010, and over 500,000 in 2011, and has been sending us some large number like that each year for about the last 20 years. (The wiki, however ONLY suggests production numbers totaling 2,500,000 -- whichever.)

Now I have to assume there are more than 90 of those millions that have failed due to some defect in the gun itself (rather than due to operator or ammunition errors which would have damaged any other gun equally or worse).

Still... 90 vs. some number of MILLIONS?

So, in other words, if you bought yourself 28 THOUSAND Glocks, you could reasonably expect ONE of them would fail due to a manufacturing defect? You could shoot a new Glock every day of an average person's lifespan before you found the bad one.

From a statistical standpoint, Glocks seem to be doing ok. But few people are statisticians. ;)

beatledog7
November 10, 2012, 08:14 AM
Here is what I referred to as bashing.

The originator of that paper seems to believe that he created the FIRST MODERN HANDGUN. It was non other than Mr. Gaston Glock in a 1988 patent application.
No wonder they [sic] blow up, no wonder they can't [sic] get the hardening right. No wonder they need retrofits extensively and it must be the only pistol in the world for which a term of a particular malfunction was coined.
I am glad I do not own a Glock. I hope you enjoy your glock.

The PDF attachment is the same text with my snotty comments added in italics and high-lighted.

That is snotty, mean spirited Glock bashing. You even admit to being snotty.

The other part, the quotes from the patent, was what I meant by an original approach.

And then you toss in this:

I have on record 90 total failures of Glock pistols. Some of them resulted in injuries to hands.

Really? How many Glocks have been sold? Statistics are had to come by, but some estimates say a million in the US alone. (Sam's post has better numbers--it hit while I was composing this one.) And you can document 90 failures?

To make a comparison, the Honda Accord has frequently made the most-often-stolen cars list, leading some folks to think there was sort of security flaw in the vehicle. Truth is simpler--thieves are opportunists, and Accords are so numerous that when a thief finds an easy mark, it is naturally going to be an Accord fairly often.

It's the same with Glock pistols. There are a lot of them, so when a pistol fails, it has a better than average chance of being a Glock even if every make fails at the same rate. It's impossible to make failure statistics meaningful without taking that into account.

So your post seems to have been made with just one purpose, really. A clever approach at first, but in the end it was simple Glock bashing. No way around it.

I don't personally care. I own a Glock that has had about 1,000 rounds through it and has had one FTE (with lead handloads in an aftermarket barrel) and has never blown up. I like it and I trust it. My feelings are not hurt. I just think you should be up front with us. When you get called out as a Glock basher, don't try to hide; admit it.

lawboy
November 10, 2012, 11:23 AM
The original post seems like a witch hunt for a problem to me. The manual of arms for any modern pistol is fairly simple and easily accomplished safely. Accidents are very rarely known to be the fault of the pistol design. If you can drive a car and stop it suddenly to avoid an accident without running off the road or stalling the engine of a manual transmission then you can operate a pistol.

People operate jet fighter aircraft at high speed while locked in deadly combat while stressing their bodies to the limit and they manage. Operating silly handgun is supposed to be some kind of huge challenge?

I mean, really? Come one!

Practice what you need to practice and get on with it.

Odd Job
November 10, 2012, 11:47 AM
The pistol that first came to mind when I read bio-engineering was the Vektor CP-1

That's what I thought also. It is the most comfortable gun to hold and point (well, out of all the ones I have tried). Pity the trigger is so crap though, when you actually fire it.
Having said that, I carried one IWB for more than 5 years in Johannesburg. It was very nice to carry, very comfortable indeed...

Owen
November 12, 2012, 10:39 PM
I would say that verbage is pretty typical for patents. And Gaston would not have written the patent, a lawyer would have. One of the things patents do is shotgun a large number of innovation claims, to give the originator something to work with in court.

bds
November 12, 2012, 11:45 PM
I do not see it as glock bashing, I have posted unaltered extracts from 1988 US Patent 4.825.744
OMG, with all due respect!

This is the actual abstract of US Patent 4,825,744 issued on 5/2/1989 and filed on 8/2/1988 (SN: 227,514) - http://www.google.com/patents?id=PV88AAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&zoom=4&output=text

If you actually read the patent abstract, what OP posted is what Gaston Glock described in "BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION" that were problems with "AUTOMATIC PISTOL" that his new invention would address
OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved pistol.

Another object is the provision of such an improved pistol which overcomes the above-given disadvantages (what winfried posted in OP (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=8500479#post8500479))

Yet another object is to provide an easy-to-use but very safe automatic pistol which can be produced at low cost.

The blue highlights represent the new inventions that address the problems OP posted (my comments in parenthesis/bold blue letters) and refer to corresponding diagrams:
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A pistol according to the invention has a frame, a barrel slidable on the frame and having a cartridgereceiving rear end, and a breach block slidable on the frame and engageable over the rear end of the barrel to form a cartridge chamber. A standard slide carries the barrel and breech block. A firing element and a firing pin operatively linked thereto are movable on the breech block toward and away from the barrel between a rear position in which the firing pin is out of the cartridge chamber and a front position with the firing pin projecting forward into the cartridge chamber for firing a cartridge in the chamber when the firing element moves from the rear to the front position. A relatively strong firing spring braced against the firing element urges same into the front position and a relatively weak spring braced against the firing element urges same into the rear position. A trigger movable on the frame between an actuated and an unactuated position and an abutment engageable with the firing element and displaceable backward on the frame are linked together so as to displace the firing element back into the rear position on displacement of the trigger from the unactuated to the actuated position and to displace the abutment out of operative engagement with the firing element on displacement of the trigger into the actuated position for displacement of the firing element by the springs into the front position. (Trigger is attached to the bar that pushes up on the striker block to release the striker - so unless the trigger is pulled back, even if the striker moves forward, the striker block would prevent the tip of the striker from coming forward of the breach wall to hit the primer cup)

According to another feature of this invention, the abutment is engageable with the firing element in an intermediate position thereof in the unactuated position of the trigger and the linkage displaces the firing element backward from the intermediate position into the rear position by means of the abutment on displacement of the trigger from the unactuated to the actuated position.

Thus, the starting position of the abutment for the firing bolt or hammer is at an intermediate location in the travel path of same. In this manner, the firing mechanism can be such that the trigger force is substantially less than with the known pistols. Preferably, the starting position of the firing pin is in a noncritical region of its travel path or that of the hammer, in which region the force of the partially loaded firing-pin spring or hammer spring is insufficient to fire a shot. (When a round is chambered or slide cycled on empty chamber, striker is pulled back about 1/3 way. This "pre-loading" of striker lightens the 2/3 DA pull of striker. If the striker somehow was released from this 1/3 pre-loaded position, the force is not sufficient to indent the primer cup to ignite it)

According to this invention, the spring means includes a relatively strong firing spring braced against 5 the firing element and urging same into the front position and a relatively weak spring braced against the firing element and urging same into the back position. The trigger or cocking force is the difference between these spring forces and can be set at a hair trigger or a 10 relatively stiff novice level. In other words, the pistol is always uncocked or at least partially uncocked. The cocking for each shot is effected by the trigger and is assisted by a spring, so that the condition of the pistol is the same before the first shot as it is before the subsequent shots (Figure 15).

According to another feature of this invention, the firing means includes a guide holding the abutment in operative engagement with the firing element on displacement of the trigger from the unactuated to the 20 actuated position. In addition, when the element is in the intermediate position the abutment prevents any displacement of the firing element relative to the abutment. Accidental discharge of the pistol therefore is impossible.

In accordance with another feature of the invention the abutment is displaceable laterally relative to the firing element between a position in the path of same and engageable therewith and a position out of the path and unengageable therewith, the link means displacing 30 the abutment into the out-of-path position on displacement of the trigger into the actuated position. This movement of the abutment which frees the firing element—firing pin or hammer—in a direction perpendicular to one in which this element moves to fire the 35 cartridge means that if the pistol is jarred, as for example by being dropped, it is virtually impossible for the necessary forces to be exerted on the mechanism to fire the pistol (So even with chambered pistol that may be dropped, spring tensions on the trigger/striker pin block will prevent the striker tip from moving past the breach wall to indent the primer cup).

The abutment can, according to this invention, be 40 rotatable between the in-path and the out-of-path positions. More particularly when the firing element is a longitudinally displaceable bolt and the abutment has a sleeve carried thereon, the firing means includes a torsion spring urging the abutment into the in-path posi- 45 tion. The abutment is an arm projecting from the sleeve and the breech block is formed with a guide holding the abutment in operative engagement with the firing element on displacement of the trigger from the unactuated to the actuated position. In addition, in such an 50 arrangement, the link means includes a trigger slide displaceable parallel to and transversely of the path of travel of the firing pin and having a spring urging it into engagement with the abutment.

The abutment can be a lever having one pivoted end 55 and an opposite end engageable in the path of the firing element and deflectable thereby out of the path thereof to free the firing element for firing. More particularly, when the abutment is such a lever it can have one end engaging in the path of the firing element and another 60 end formed with a slot. The frame has a pivot pin traversing the slot and the firing mechanism comprises a spring urging the one end away from the pivot pin. Once again, the displacement direction for the link is transverse of the firing pin. Therefore, the pistol is very 65 jar-resistant.

In accordance with this invention, the firing element can also be a hammer pivotal on the frame, in which case the firing mechanism includes a firing pin carrying the firing pin tip and engageable with the hammer and the spring means and abutment are engageable with the hammer. The abutment can be a two-arm lever Mockingly engageable with the hammer and laterally deflectable out of engagement therewith. It can also be a longitudinally slidable trigger slide.

In a particularly simple construction according to this invention, the firing element is a firing bolt carrying the firing pin tip and a firing-pin nose and the abutment is directly engageable with the nose. Furthermore, the link means includes a trigger slide and an inclined surface on the frame engageable with the trigger slide in the actuated position of the trigger. This link means includes a spring urging the slide into engagement with the inclined surface.

To eliminate the problem of firing-pin tip breakage which plagues automatic pistols, the firing pin tip is lance-shaped and the breech block is formed with an elongated throughgoing slot through which the lanceshaped pin tip engages. More particularly, the firing pin has a flattened triangular tip lying in the pistol plane, so it is very strong in this direction, which is the same as the shell-ejection direction.
These are strikers from my G22/G27. Instead of traditional round firing pins that takes on the entire shock of primer cup/powder ignition, triangular lance shaped narrow Glock striker tips have box shaped body that bumps the back of the breach wall under spring tension to buffer against shock of primer cup/powder ignition, limiting the striker tip travel against the primer cup - it is for this reason why spent cases from Glocks have distinct rectangle indentations on the spent primer cups which are from rectangle slots on the breach wall. (FYI, carbon fouling build up can hard pack under the rectangle face of the striker body behind the breach wall - if/when this occurs, especially from dirty loads, striker tip travel past the breach wall can be limited and result in lighter primer cup indentations/failure to ignite. Cleaning/scraping the back of breach wall of hard packed fouling build up with precision flat screwdriver and cleaning with gun solvent will return proper striker tip travel to indent the primer cup deep enough to ignite).

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=155159&stc=1&d=1324482378

The pistol according to this invention has latch means for releasably securing the barrel to the frame. This means includes a projection on the barrel movable along a path on sliding of the barrel and breech block on the frame, a frame abutment on the frame and normally in the path, and means for moving the frame abutment out of engagement with the barrel projection. The frame abutment can be an eccentric pivotal into and out of the in-path position, or can be a slide displaceable parallel to the clip hole in the frame. Either arrangement makes removal of the slide relatively easy.

In addition, the pistol of this invention has a clip removably engageable with the frame and holding a supply of cartridges displaceable by the breech into the chamber, and safety means engageable between the clip and the link means for permitting the abutment to move out of engagement with the firing element only when at least one cartridge remains in the clip. To this end, the clip has a cartridge follower and the safety means includes an element on the frame engageable through the clip with the follower. Thus, when the last shot is fired, the slide will not return forward, so that a new clip can be inserted with automatic chambering of the first cartridge (When the last round is fired from the magazine, a notch on the magazine follower will push up on the slide lock lever to lock the slide back).

The pistol according to this invention is set up so that the abutment cannot catch the firing element and recock and fire it when the trigger is held back. Instead the trigger must be released between shots to move the link forward into its forward position where it can engage the abutment. In other words, the abutment and link can only engage one another when the firing element is in the intermediate position and the link is in the trigger-unactuated position.

With the pistol of this invention, releasing and firing are done with the same element. Thus, the condition of the pistol is the same before the first shot as it is before the subsequent shots. This is attained when the guide which establishes the path of the abutment during the loading motion blocks projection of the abutment into the travel path of the firing pin or hammer. The pistol is therefore always uncocked or partially uncocked (Trigger can only be reset to fire by returning the trigger back forward, but because the striker is pre-loaded 1/3 way by the cycling of the slide, full reset of trigger is done when the trigger moves back 2/3 way which results in shorter trigger reset for faster follow up shots/double taps).

Handling of the pistol according to the instant invention is therefore as simple as possible. The pistol is ready after chambering of the cartridge in the barrel for shooting at any time and is nonetheless completely safe from unintentional shots. Similarly in this condition the pistol is fully drop- and jar-resistant. As a result of the unchanging trigger force, accuracy is increased. Simple and safe handling of the pistol is ensured even for the 5 unpracticed user. (With no external frame/slide mounted safety to engage/disengage, as soon as the round is chambered, the pistol can remain safe from accidental discharge, even when dropped, until the trigger is pulled which automatically disengages internal safeties - this allows the shooter to focus more on the target. Since every trigger pull is the same, including the initial first pull unlike DA/SA triggers, especially with lightened trigger from 1/3 "pre-loading" of trigger and shorter 2/3 reset, greater shot-to-shot accuracy can be achieved with faster follow-up shots/double taps).

As a result of the small number of parts and the possible fitting of the firing mechanism into a small space, the frame can be of one piece, preferably of a synthetic resin, so that the overall weight is substantially less than 10 that of comparable known pistols. In addition, manufacture is simplified and made inexpensive. In fact, the entire frame can be a synthetic-resin casting made with a simple two-piece mold, and the various elements like the firing element and guide for the slide can be formed 15 by metallic inserts (The four metallic inserts on the frame for the slide act as "self cleaning" slide guides so even when slide channels are filled with debri/dirt/fouling, cycling action of the slide cleans and clears debri/dirt/fouling out of the slide channels. Not only can the frame be manufactured at lower cost using polymer body, high speed videos shows polymer body flexing during firing and IMO, absorbing some of the recoil to reduce shock/felt recoil to the shooter which allows faster recovery for follow-up shots/double taps). (much more at abstract link with detailed pictures)

barnbwt
November 13, 2012, 12:52 AM
That last paragraph is the important one, BTW ;)

TCB

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