Shopping for a new high powered rifle


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scheaman88
November 8, 2012, 01:39 PM
My name is Sgt Craig Schea and i am currently deployed to afghanistan. I am currently looking into purchasing a new high powered rifle for hunting purposes. My eye has been caught by the Browning A Bolt II Long Range Hunter boared in the 300 RUM. I am wanting to get into reloading for the rifle that i purchase but would also like to be able to purchase ammo for it off the shelf that will still take care of business out in the field. The rifle i purchase will be mainly used for hunting out in texas and new mexico areas since i will be relocating to a new duty station after this deployment. Any feed back and input that is givin will be highly appreciated thanks for your time. :)

Alright im throwing in another one that im surprised more people have not mentioned and thats the .300 Win Mag. I like fueling the fire on this discussion and just overall like to hear about everyones experiences with all these different calibers and brands. So have at it guys lets see where this one goes.

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Robert
November 8, 2012, 01:50 PM
Craig, welcome to THR! While I know nothing about the 300 RUM if that is what you want go for it. My Elk rifle is a Winchester M70 in 375H&H and I could not be happier. Might be worth a look, but then I am kind of a fan boy of the round.

HARV6
November 8, 2012, 02:47 PM
When you say you want to be able to purchase ammo for it off the shelf, 300RUM gets scratched off the list. You won't have any problems ordering it off the internet though. What are you looking to hunt? I personally don't see the rational behind ultra mags. At the distances that they offer an appreciable advantage on game over something like a 300WM, 9 out of 10 guys can't even hit the target. And even then most people don't have the time needed to be accurate and ethical at those ranges. Then there's the recoil to do deal with. I'm sure some people have a legitimate use for them or they wouldn't be around, but I wouldn't recommend one.

HARV6
November 8, 2012, 02:57 PM
Oh yeah... From my personal experience. If you really want one, get one. If you love it great, if not you can always sell it and get something you think will serve you better.

Temp430
November 8, 2012, 03:01 PM
That 300 RUM will work great on New Mexico elk. I use a .30-06 but there have been a couple times when I wished I had a 300 RUM. Remington's power level ammo gives the rifle some flexibility.

scheaman88
November 8, 2012, 03:23 PM
Robert thanks for the welcome. Harv46 as far as not being able to buy at a store for ammo its not a huge concern just requires planning ahead for hunting trips or range trips. I think the only real thing that caught my eye for the 300 rum is just because it has the power level ammo so if i want to go after white tail one weekend i can use power level one ammo but if i decide that i want to go after a big elk in New Mexico then i can jump up to lvl 2 or 3 depending on the range and size of elk im encounter. Also being in the military i have my moto of bigger is better. I also want a rifle that can be versitile(sp) and easy to carry if i find my self on a long hike looking for moose, elk, carabou or any other large game that would require me to make a long trek. If there are other rifles that you guys have used for these situations above and have had great results and can be swayed at this point since i am just starting my journey on a search for the best high powered rifle at a reasonable price. Again thank you for all of your input. Temp 430 i look forward to taking one of those New Mexico elk any suggestions on places to go hunting new Fort Bliss That are in New Mexico?

HARV6
November 8, 2012, 07:03 PM
At that price point I'd suggest a Browning A-Bolt Stalker or Kimber Montana in 300WSM. I think if you'll regularly be hiking and hunting for elk they'd offer a good crompomise of portability and power. And from what I've seen most places that are primarily hunting stores will carry 300WSM nowadays.

scheaman88
November 8, 2012, 07:20 PM
those sound like good compromises. im also looking into being able to reload for the rifle i buy. im not sure if you are keen on this but what round would be the easiest to adapt reloaders from pistol to rifle?

HARV6
November 8, 2012, 07:41 PM
I'm a novice reloader for both pistol and rifle. I don't think there's much adaption. The only things that I can think of that are different are you have to lube rifle cases to size them, and instead of belling case necks like you do on pistols rounds, you chamfer the mouths of rifle brass to help accept the bullet. Just a little more time consuming for a rifle. A lot of people say reloading belted magnums can be more of a hassle but I havent yet encountered any problems because I've only loaded up unfired brass in my 7RM so far.

scheaman88
November 8, 2012, 07:51 PM
Thats good knowledge to have thanks for the information.

Abel
November 8, 2012, 08:12 PM
I suggest a Ruger Hawkeye in 30-06.

Njal Thorgeirsson
November 9, 2012, 01:00 AM
I'm not the most experienced shooter in the world, but I have shot a friend's .300 RUM (I am not sure exactly what brand/model- its a stainless laminate rifle). The gun doesn't have a limbsaver or any aftermarket recoil pad, just the hard factory rubber one. I'm definitely not a big guy and I had no problem firing it [without developing a flinch] after ~10 rounds, so despite what some frequently say about the RUM, don't let the recoil scare you into a lighter cartridge if you are primarily going to hunt with it.

That being said, .300 RUM is expensive- I'm not sure how much factory ammunition is, but I believe handloads are well over $1/round. You also don't gain a significant amount of performance over some of the lighter 30 caliber cartridges for hunting purposes. Unless you're trying to hunt at a thousand yards or something, a smaller .30 cartridge might be more suitable.

Although I don't have enough expertise to verify or disagree, I've heard from a few sources that the .300 RUM is pretty hard on barrels- I've heard in some cases as little as 2000 rounds has resulted in severely worn barrels and poor accuracy. But take that with a grain of salt.

But if you are ok with the price of ammunition, and you don't mind a bit more recoil for a somewhat small gain in performance, then go for it. Its not a bad cartridge by any means- it just might not be the most practical or necessary.

If you want to consider some other .30's, look into a .300 win mag or the good old .30-06. Both are plenty powerful and yield plenty of range for your purposes while being a bit more economical (and more common in sporting goods stores).

Njal Thorgeirsson
November 9, 2012, 01:06 AM
I'm not the most experienced shooter in the world, but I have shot a friend's .300 RUM (I am not sure exactly what brand/model- its a stainless laminate rifle). The gun doesn't have a limbsaver or any aftermarket recoil pad, just the hard factory rubber one. I'm definitely not a big guy and I had no problem firing it [without developing a flinch] after ~10 rounds, so despite what some frequently say about the RUM, don't let the recoil scare you into a lighter cartridge if you are primarily going to hunt with it.

That being said, .300 RUM is expensive- I'm not sure how much factory ammunition is, but I believe handloads are well over $1/round. You also don't gain a significant amount of performance over some of the lighter 30 caliber cartridges for hunting purposes. Unless you're trying to hunt at a thousand yards or something, a smaller .30 cartridge might be more suitable.

Although I don't have enough expertise to verify or disagree, I've heard from a few sources that the .300 RUM is pretty hard on barrels- I've heard in some cases as little as 2000 rounds has resulted in severely worn barrels and poor accuracy. But take that with a grain of salt.

But if you are ok with the price of ammunition, and you don't mind a bit more recoil for a somewhat small gain in performance, then go for it. Its not a bad cartridge by any means- it just might not be the most practical or necessary.

If you want to consider some other .30's, look into a .300 win mag or the good old .30-06. Both are plenty powerful and yield plenty of range for your purposes while being a bit more economical (and more common in sporting goods stores). Personally, I'd say go with the .300 win mag. Its very popular, easy to find, and undoubtedly a lot cheaper to reload. And there won't be a noticeable difference in hunting performance in most, if not practically all, hunting circumstances.

Njal Thorgeirsson
November 9, 2012, 01:07 AM
I'm not the most experienced shooter in the world, but I have shot a friend's .300 RUM (I am not sure exactly what brand/model- its a stainless laminate rifle). It is a very flat-shooting and powerful round.

That being said, .300 RUM is expensive- I'm not sure how much factory ammunition is, but I believe handloads are well over $1/round. You also don't gain a significant amount of performance over some of the lighter 30 caliber cartridges for hunting purposes. Unless you're trying to hunt at a thousand yards or something, a smaller .30 cartridge might be more suitable.

Although I don't have enough expertise to verify or disagree, I've heard from a few sources that the .300 RUM is pretty hard on barrels- I've heard in some cases as little as 2000 rounds has resulted in severely worn barrels and poor accuracy. But take that with a grain of salt.

But if you are ok with the price of ammunition, and you don't mind a bit more recoil for a somewhat small gain in performance, then go for it. Its not a bad cartridge by any means- it just might not be the most practical or necessary.

If you want to consider some other .30's, look into a .300 win mag or the good old .30-06. Both are plenty powerful and yield plenty of range for your purposes while being a bit more economical (and more common in sporting goods stores). Personally, I'd say go with the .300 win mag. Its very popular, easy to find, and undoubtedly a lot cheaper to reload. And there won't be a noticeable difference in hunting performance in most, if not practically all, hunting circumstances.

scheaman88
November 9, 2012, 11:59 AM
Njal Thorgeirsson, thanks for the input it is much appreciated and gives me more things that i can research for myself to try and confirm or disprove those rumors. I am considering going with the 300 win mag as an alternative to the RUM but im still not completely set on my choice yet still have plenty of research ahead before making the final call.

Glock Jeremy
November 9, 2012, 01:26 PM
Hi Craig,

First off, thanks for your service. I returned from my second tour last November.

Now, your taste in rifles is excellent. All browning A bolts are excellent rifles, and any choice about the model is a good choice. I do not recommend 300RUM as a calibre for most people. This is a hot magnum pushing large bullets. That means recoil. You won't enjoy the recoil much, and probably won't shoot it as much as you want. Even the 300 Win Mag is a kicker.
If you want to hunt Elk I would highly recommend 7mm rem mag. This will kill elk all day long at some impressive ranges. I would have no issues at all shooting at 600 yards, and with practice probably out past 800-900 yards. Recoil is manageable, ammunition is cheaper and easier to find, and it is a very flat shooter. My hold over at 600 yards is about 3 feet.
do some research internet research on the 7 rem mag and you will be impressed.

1858
November 9, 2012, 01:55 PM
I do not recommend 300RUM as a calibre for most people. This is a hot magnum pushing large bullets. That means recoil. You won't enjoy the recoil much, and probably won't shoot it as much as you want.

The idea behind Remington's .300 RUM is that you can shoot loads equivalent to .308 Win, .30-06 Sprg and .300 Win Mag in the same rifle that shoots 180 or 200gr bullets at 3,000 fps +. Remington supports the .300 RUM with four power levels of ammunition if you include managed recoil. I'm not endorsing the cartridge since I wouldn't buy a rifle chambered for it but it doesn't have to the beast that some think it is.


My hold over at 600 yards is about 3 feet

Is that with a 300 yard zero? What load/bullet weight/velocity?

1858
November 9, 2012, 01:58 PM
scheaman88,
Winchester makes a very good rifle such as the Extreme Weather SS, and as was mentioned, the Kimber Montana is a great rifle. A Montana in .300 Win Mag or .300 WSM would make a great deer/elk rifle.

jmr40
November 9, 2012, 03:18 PM
Buy the Winchester, forget the 300 RUM. A 300 WSM or 30-06 will kill anything as far as you can ethically shoot at big game with a lot less expense and recoil.

rondaxe
November 9, 2012, 03:48 PM
"If you can't do it with a 30-06 it probably can't be done", the late Col. jeff Cooper. I'm no rifle expert, don't claim to be one, but I believe a lot of Afghan bad guys met there maker after a well placed shot from a 7.62x51 round, some at a pretty good distance. Not putting down the 300 RUM, just sayin'.

scheaman88
November 9, 2012, 03:53 PM
Thanks for all the input guys i am going to be doing my research on all of these weapons for sure. One thing for me is that i want to reload for the rifle that i buy. I have seen supplies for all of these rifles to reload them but out of these what is going to be the most versatile rifle as far as loads that i can conjour up?

ZGunner
November 9, 2012, 04:12 PM
I've heard a lot can be done with 30-06. .308 is pretty versatile and there are plenty of good rounds off the self in those calibers and you can probably get a rifle for a whole lot less than a 300 RUM. Unless you're just itchin' to burn through that tax-free combat pay. :D

scheaman88
November 9, 2012, 04:26 PM
Thanks Zgunner im not trying to burn it all up but would like to get something nice when i return with it.

Glock Jeremy
November 9, 2012, 09:37 PM
The idea behind Remington's .300 RUM is that you can shoot loads equivalent to .308 Win, .30-06 Sprg and .300 Win Mag in the same rifle that shoots 180 or 200gr bullets at 3,000 fps +. Remington supports the .300 RUM with four power levels of ammunition if you include managed recoil. I'm not endorsing the cartridge since I wouldn't buy a rifle chambered for it but it doesn't have to the beast that some think it is.




Is that with a 300 yard zero? What load/bullet weight/velocity?
The load I am using is is Barnes LRX 145 grain and RL 22. I believe 66.5 grains. I dont have my reloading data handy but I believe it was chrono'd at around 3200 FPS

My big issue with the RUM is the case capacity. Downloading it too much leaves space in the case, and too much space can cause ignition problems and pressure spikes. Factory ammo is safe, however one has to be careful of powder choice when reloading.

scheaman88
November 10, 2012, 11:46 AM
Glock Jeremy, thank you for your sharing of information i will be looking at these specs for when i start taking on the reloading process.

crazyponie
November 10, 2012, 03:28 PM
I'm kind of suprised that one of the original long, flat, hard hittingest hunting rifles ever concieved by man hasn't been mentioned. (.300 Weatherby):) It's been around for some time and can be loaded down to 150 all the way up too 220grn pills reliably. And plus, if you get a MarkV deluxe version, it will be one of the best looking rifles you will ever own. Ok, so I'm a little partial but it's just my .02. :evil:

Random Discharge
November 10, 2012, 03:50 PM
Especially if you want to reload.

If you own a Rem 7 Mag, Win 270 or 30-06, you have no need for another high power rifle. Any of these will serve you very, very well. There are more powerful rounds, but none of them will do the job materially better and none of them will compensate with more power for poorer shooting with a higher recoil round. These are contemporary ever popular classics for a reason.

Nothing wrong with the new RUM, WSM, etc. They are great rounds. But they exist to solve a problem for manufacturers, not shooters. They are designed to sell new rifles and new rounds to shooters old and new. And all the better, for this purpose, if they quickly fall out of favor. "Out of favor" creates a new market for another new round. And the cycle begins anew with another new fad.

beatledog7
November 10, 2012, 04:42 PM
A-Bolt, yes. 300RUM, not so much. It's not too hard to find good deals on older A-Bolts in 7Mag or 30-06, many of which have seen little action. I'd go for one of those.

Glock Jeremy
November 10, 2012, 05:08 PM
I'm kind of suprised that one of the original long, flat, hard hittingest hunting rifles ever concieved by man hasn't been mentioned. (.300 Weatherby):) It's been around for some time and can be loaded down to 150 all the way up too 220grn pills reliably. And plus, if you get a MarkV deluxe version, it will be one of the best looking rifles you will ever own. Ok, so I'm a little partial but it's just my .02. :evil:
If you look at the books 300 WBY is great.

The big issue with 300 WBY is that very few manufacturers offer anything in this calibre. This leaves you buying an expensive Weatherby rifle or going custom.
The other issue is that ammunition is very expensive compared to Win Mag, and less common. So essentially you get ballistics that are maybe 10% better for probably twice the cost. Brass is two bucks to three bucks a piece if you reload. I do like the case design, but for the average guy 200 FPS across the board probably is not worth it for the price.

scheaman88
November 10, 2012, 06:19 PM
Random Discharge great input i love to hear from people who have well thought out opinions. I however do not have a high powered rifle at this time never owned one and i am looking for one to buy. i like the 300 Rum for the simple reason that i can order three different charges for this weapon to shoot at levels equal to 30-06, 300 win mag. and 300 rum. Now with that in mind i have been looking at other calibers such as the ones you have mentioned and have been comparing them with the conditions i plan to use them in in my mind while comparing.

Crazyponie, Im kinda with glockjeremy on this one great shooting in the books from what i have looked at just a little pricey for reloading.

Beatledog7, Why would you not choose the 300 RUM? Bad experiences or what?

Badlander
November 10, 2012, 08:47 PM
If A 30-06 won't reach out and kill it you are not on this continent. If you can't buy 30-06 ammo at the nearest spotting goods store you arent here either.

beatledog7
November 10, 2012, 08:52 PM
Beatledog7, Why would you not choose the 300 RUM? Bad experiences or what?

I honestly have not shot one. It's hyper expensive for a non-reloader (you, Sgt) and doesn't offer a significant advantage over 30-06 or 7Mag (unless you're going to hunt in Alaska or Africa), but it reportedly kicks much harder than either. They both kick quite hard enough.

The bottom line is that an elk well hit with a 175gr 7mm bullet is just as dead as one hit by a 180gr .30cal bullet. I wouldn't recommend anything bigger than a 30-06 for anyone who's never dealt with high power recoil before, but I like the flatter shooting 7Mag over the 30-06.

If I were to go bigger than a 7Mag, I'd go on up to a .338 Win Mag.

scheaman88
November 10, 2012, 09:33 PM
Again thanks for the input beatledog7 and there is the possibility of going to alaska to go hunting but i guess if that becomes an option i will just pony up for the bigger rifle it=f it is neccessary for the hunt i am going on.

Random Discharge
November 10, 2012, 10:42 PM
[QUOTE=scheaman88;8504984] I however do not have a high powered rifle at this time never owned one and i am looking for one to buy. i like the 300 Rum for the simple reason that i can order three different charges for this weapon to shoot at levels equal to 30-06, 300 win mag. and 300 rum. QUOTE]

Exactly - you don't a high power rifle yet, so buy a versatile rifle first, and a fad later. A Rem 7 Mag, 270 or 30-06 can be had in lighter managed recoil rounds, or souped up Hornady rounds, or "standard" rounds. These cartridges comes in light weight bullets, medium weight bullets, and heavy weight bullets. Bullets available for these cartridges come in fast expanding CXP2 deer variety and slower expanding CXP3 variety designed to give better penetration before expansion dumps their energy on even larger game. And we haven't even started reloading yet! My point is that adjustable loads are nothing new. There are a plethora of adjustable loads for the classics.

Personally, I'd want to download a 30-06 for deer. Nothing against the 30-06, but inside 200 yards, Bambi doesn't stand a chance against a 30-30. For the range of use you have in mind, I recommend considering a power level lower than the top echelon. This will give greater flexibility to go up or down for years to come.

scheaman88
November 10, 2012, 11:35 PM
Badlander, nice post i like it.

Random Discharge I am looking very seriously at the 7MM REM MAG in the browning a bolt II pretty close to the same price as the 300 rum however i can go to nearly any store and purchase ammo for the 7mm instead of ordering it over the internet like i would have to do for the 300 rum.

Again guys all your inputs and advice are invaluble thank you very much and keep it coming.

pbrktrt
November 11, 2012, 09:51 AM
I would be ordering a Vanguard S2 from Bud's, a Zeiss Conquest 3x9x42 from Cabela's, and a DNZ mount to put together an almost perfect rifle. The caliber? 270 Win of course.You would have around a $1000.00 for everything minus some 130gr ammo. Put it together, sight it in, and hunt what ever you want with confidence.

AABEN
November 11, 2012, 11:24 AM
The 270 is a very good round it can be loader from 90gr up to 160 it is and all around gun. GOOD LUCK THANKS for serving are country.

WVRJ
November 11, 2012, 07:47 PM
The RUM would have some advantages as far as the different power levels of factory ammo.But if you're gonna reload,you can work that angle very easily with a lot of other rounds.I like the 300 Win Mag,use 180 gr Partitions for elk and 150 grainers for deer.It's not an unpleasant round to shoot and ammo for it is easily purchased most anywhere.The main thing to keep in mind is if you're gonna buy something,get what you really want,and then if it doesn't work out,trade it.I wish women were like that.

scheaman88
November 11, 2012, 08:00 PM
pbrktrt, thanks for the help i actually did go to buds and look i like the selections and prices they have.

AABEN, thanks for the input and thank you also for your past service. happy veterans day.

WVRJ, i am with you on this one now i am looking at the 300 win mag for the reasons you have stated. and i hear ya on the women too.

akodo
November 11, 2012, 10:25 PM
scheaman88

First, thanks for your service

Second, the Browning Abolt II is a very fine rifle

Third, forget about the 300 RUM.

For starters, your average AR-15 kicks with 3 pounds of force, the 300 RUM lvl 3 kicks with 30 pounds of force. Most people who shoot their first full-powered rifle can handle 15 to 20 pounds of kick, starting at 25 to 30 is TROUBLE.

The different power levels of ammunition don't offset this much. 300 RUM managed recoil is the same as standard 30-06 as far as kick, it just does it at twice the cost to your pocketbook.

Also realize that whenever you put in a different chambering, even with a good old 30-06 switching between a 150 grain standard power round for deer to a 180 grain standard power round for elk, you need to re-sight the rifle. The change is even greater if you are going from a 150 grain 300 RUM managed recoil to a 180 grain 300 RUM lvl 3. It's not like you can just pull the powerhouse round out of your shirt pocket and upgrade your rifle to a grizzly gun, you'll have to re-zero.

The fact that maybe a year or two after the 300 RUM came out, remington started offering the three different levels of 300 RUM ammo should tell you that most of the guys who bought the gun thought 'holy $%&# this thing kicks HARD!'

Even if you reload, the massive case size of the 300 RUM presents some issues with making tame loads. Traditionally to make a tame load a handloader would take an existing load and reduce the powder charge slightly. However too much free space in a cartridge can cause it to blow up. (although some guys fill the extra space with malt-o-meal) So you end up using a whole lot of big granual powder to take up the space in the big case...which means even when reloading you are spending more than you would if you had a 30-06 or some other more reasonable cartridge.

Get yourself a nice 270 winchester, 30-06, or 7mm-08. All of those can take an elk handily at pretty good range. If you think you need a bit more reach (you don't, but you might think you do :) ) then the 7mm Remmag, the 270 WSM is a better choice than the 300 RUM.

When I was in my early 20s my friend and I had fun shooting our AKs and SKSs and such and then we both decided to get 'deer/elk rifles' (most of our previous hunting was done in shotgun only areas). I got a 7mm Remmag and he got a 300 RUM. I was a fool. He was a total fool. We'd have both been better off with 270 winchesters, 30-06s, 7mm-08s or all sorts of other better choices for deer/elk rifles.

Oh, theres guys whose first gun is a 375 H&H and who get on fine with a beast like that, but that is the exception not the norm.

Get something reasonable first. Then, when you get to a point where a 300 RUM with lvl 3 'full power' loads would be advisable, get yourself a nice 338 winmag or 375 H&H because if something needs a 300 RUM full power load, then it's wise to go with something wider than .30

Lots of guys go to Africa with a 270 and a 375H&H, the lighter being used for the vast majority of hunting and the heavy comes out for lion, big Eland, etc. (Of course guys going to Africa for the 'big 5' add an even heavier gun for buff, Rhino, Hippo, and Elephant.)

scheaman88
November 11, 2012, 11:26 PM
Third, forget about the 300 RUM.

Already done its out the window.

Now i have set my sites still towards the .300 Win Mag. Im not scared of recoil that i can handle and i understand that its punishing yourself but I'm a gluton for punishment.

Thankyou still for all of your input its wonderful to hear all this feedback.

And thanks for the happy vets day wishes.

Bobson
November 11, 2012, 11:58 PM
Sgt Schea, I think you've made a wise decison opting for the 300 Win Mag, given your original starting point. You could always have the barrel of the rifle threaded, and order a muzzle break from any reputable gunsmith, if you want to cut even more of the recoil. Wouldn't be a bad idea to have that done right off the bat.

I've heard mixes reviews of the A-Bolt, but most were positive. However, if you're wanting to pick up "something nice," I think you would do well to take a step up to the nicer Winchester Model 70 Super Grade. If you think hunting in humid climates is a real possibility, you should give the Winchester M70 Extreme Weather some serious consideration.

I've owned the Extreme Weather (though mine was chambered in .270 Win), and it's a remarkable rifle. I wish I didn't have to sell mine, and I'm eager to replace it.

golfer_ray
November 12, 2012, 12:02 AM
I have no knowledge of your rifle question but wanted to sincerely thank you for your service to our great country.

scheaman88
November 12, 2012, 12:03 AM
BOBSON thanks for the input please checkout my other thread here and see what you think there also. thanks very much.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=684719

scheaman88
November 12, 2012, 12:05 AM
golfer_ray thank you very much and its an honor to be serving.

Andrew Leigh
November 12, 2012, 12:24 AM
Random Discharge great input i love to hear from people who have well thought out opinions. I however do not have a high powered rifle at this time never owned one and i am looking for one to buy. i like the 300 Rum for the simple reason that i can order three different charges for this weapon to shoot at levels equal to 30-06, 300 win mag. and 300 rum. Now with that in mind i have been looking at other calibers such as the ones you have mentioned and have been comparing them with the conditions i plan to use them in in my mind while comparing.

Crazyponie, Im kinda with glockjeremy on this one great shooting in the books from what i have looked at just a little pricey for reloading.

Beatledog7, Why would you not choose the 300 RUM? Bad experiences or what?
Hi,

The reality of the matter is that versatile rifles seldom get used for their versatility. Their versatility come in the fact that they can accept a wide range of ammo but in reality the hand loader will find one load that is sweet. You will in all likelihood find one load and standardize on it, as stated each load will print in a different position and will have have differing holdover points. When placing the cross hairs on the deer you don't want to be wondering which holdover point etc. you simply do not have the time.

Personally I cannot understand the fascination of taking an animal at over 500 yards nor do I understand the fascination with the Magnums, each to his own however, it is not wrong but not for me. I am more fascinated with animal anatomy and shot placement as this leads to an ethical kill.

When you start hunting there is a big learning curve and you will probably ease yourself in with the smaller deer and then work up the scale. There has been advice given on a .270 or 30-06 or 7mm Rem Mag. I think each one of these is infinitely more appropriate that the .300 RUM as a first rifle. Any shot out of these will do what you require when at appropriate hunting ranges. No increase in caliber can ever compensate for a poor shot.

Then there is the cost. Even though you are planning on reloading the Magnums suck lots of powder and this costs. Especially when starting out as you will be on the range lots, developing loads, sighting in rifles and in general trying to shoot under 1 MOA at 100 yards. This will take some time.

Personally I shoot with a 30-06 with hand loaded 180 gr. Accubond bullets, the load which has been tweaked for my rifle. They shoot at about 0.6 MOA. I can shoot from Springbok to Eland with this but I don't.

For the lighter antelope I have a 6.5X55mm Swede. Oh, that's the other thing not yet mentioned, once the bug bites you will find yourself buying other rifles. So what you may tend to do is to buy a caliber for the game being shot rather than one caliber for all game.Good luck with your decision, have seen too many buy too much gun and have a miserable shooting experience. The 30-06 is deemed to be on the limit of the average shooters recoil threshold. I am 260 lbs and 6'2" and developed a flinch which took some time to remedy.

Perhaps you should also consider the possibility of companion calibers. With a 30-06 you could have a .243 / .260 Rem / 6.5X55mm on the lighter side and a .375 05 9.3mm on the heavier side.

With the .270 you almost make the the .260 and the 6.5X55mm redundant but you now don't have a nice heavy bullet for bone penetration when the animal is quartering towards you. So the larger animals will have to present an open shoulder with the .270 for you to get a heart shot / double lung shot.

My ramblings are based on my personal decision making process and the result. I ended with the 30-06 with the purpose as stated of shooting everything from Springbok to Eland. The reality is that rather than loading a 150 gr. bullet for the 30-06 I opted for another caliber with a 140 gr. bullet. A large Eland bull would need to present a very good angle or I would pass up on the shot. That is where the .375 comes in (my next caliber) which will complete my hunting trilogy so to speak.

Good luck and oh ...... return home safely from you tour of duty.

scheaman88
November 12, 2012, 12:35 AM
Well Andrew i have to say that is probably the longest post that i have read concerning this matter. with that said it is probably one of the best also. I'm ont sure if you noticed the link that i post for my other thread but if you wouldnt mind jumping to that one and checking it out also i would love to have your opinion on the subject posted in my last post on that thread. It covers the .300 win mag and what manufacturers i have looked at. if you have owned any of those rifle brands and or shot them i would like your feedback. thanks for the request of a safe return i am hoping i can do that for the second straight tour. lastly thanks again for all of your input.

Bobson
November 12, 2012, 01:00 AM
Sgt Shea, I began my own search for a rifle almost exactly a year ago. My roughly four-month search (daily effort throughout the four months), which included all eight of the rifles in your other thread, and some rifles you haven't listed, left me considering three rifles: the Winchester M70 Extreme Weather, Tikka T3 Stainless Hunter, and Browning A-Bolt Stainless Stalker. I ultimately settled on the M70, and I can confidently say my next rifle will also be a Winchester.

As far as the 7mm Rem Mag goes, I can't say much. Never fired one, and I don't personally know anybody who owns one. I agree with those who said a magnum caliber is unnecessary for a great majority of hunting, but if you're totally set on a magnum, I think 300 WM is a very respectable selection.

Hope this helps a bit. Please keep us updated on what you end up buying down the road, whether in this thread or a new one.

scheaman88
November 12, 2012, 02:09 AM
BOBSON thanks for the reply and i will make sure when i get it and shoot it (whatever IT is) that i let you guys know.

Triumph Athletics
November 19, 2012, 02:12 PM
Could always get a Remington 700 5R in 300 WM. 190g Berger VLD with 4000-MR is still doing 1600 fps at 1000 yds. QL says that is 1075 fp of energy. What is the energy requirement at the distance you will be shooting?

BTW, the above load had stiff recoil. I sent gun to Score High in NM and had a brake put on. Now the recoil is much less. Gun is very accurate.

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