What would happen if you shot a gun in space?


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Tech Ninja
November 9, 2012, 06:24 PM
Cool article on guns and physics.

lifeslittlemysteries.com (http://www.lifeslittlemysteries.com/2167-gun-shoot-space.html)

"Shooting someone in the back is a cowardly act. In space, "theoretically you could shoot yourself in the back," Schultz said.

You could do it, for example, while in orbit around a planet. Because objects orbiting planets are actually in a constant state of free fall, you have to get the setup just right. You'd have to shoot horizontally at just the right altitude for the bullet to circle the planet and fall back to where it started (you). And you'd also have to consider how much you'll get kicked backwards (and consequently, how much your altitude will change) when you fire.

"The aim has to be perfect," Schultz said."

If you were a cosmonaut you could get this cool three barrel TP-82 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TP-82):

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=174470&stc=1&d=1352502882

If you enjoyed reading about "What would happen if you shot a gun in space?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Impureclient
November 9, 2012, 06:51 PM
"In space, no one can hear you scream".......when you shoot yourself in the back.

Tech Ninja
November 9, 2012, 07:03 PM
"In space, no one can hear you scream".......when you shoot yourself in the back.

Well played sir. Well played indeed.

Ky Larry
November 9, 2012, 07:20 PM
Of all the things there are to worry about.......:rolleyes:

ApacheCoTodd
November 9, 2012, 07:29 PM
Wouldn't TSA have disarmed you first?:neener:

Steel Horse Rider
November 9, 2012, 08:31 PM
I think they forgot to account for the gravitational pull on the bullet while circling either a planet or the moon. You would have to aim high.....

Certaindeaf
November 9, 2012, 08:34 PM
Yosemite Sam don't need no steenking rocketpack.

Sauer Grapes
November 9, 2012, 08:58 PM
I seem to remember reading with the 1\6th gravity of the moon, a 22cal rifle on the moon would be equivalent to shooting a 30-06 on earth.

M-Cameron
November 9, 2012, 09:09 PM
I seem to remember reading with the 1\6th gravity of the moon, a 22cal rifle on the moon would be equivalent to shooting a 30-06 on earth.


when i plug in the numbers, using a (40/6) grn bullet, at 1200 FPS, with a (7/6) lb rifle.....i get a recoil force of 0.08 FT- lbs.

seems a tad off the .30-06 mark.

BCRider
November 9, 2012, 09:11 PM
I think they forgot to account for the gravitational pull on the bullet while circling either a planet or the moon. You would have to aim high.....

You're not thinking correctly about orbital factors. When you're in orbit you're rotating around the globe fast enough that the centrifugal force is balanced against the pull of gravity.

So gravity is already factored in.

But what WOULD happen is that if you shot the bullet back along your path it's now traveling too slow to stay in orbit. So it'll come around and be too low to hit you. So you want to aim up? Sorry but that won't work either. What'll happen is you'll make the orbit of the bullet egg shaped and it'll STILL decay until it enters the atmosphere and burns up.

Trying to "shoot yourself" while in orbit in this manner would require a lot of high falutin' calculations.

Steel Horse Rider
November 9, 2012, 09:57 PM
IF you were in orbit and fired a gun, the bullet would be travelling faster than your orbital speed and your own orbital speed would be decreased by the reaction of the action of the conversion of static energy to active energy. The mass and speed of the projectile would then have to be calculated to determine its natural orbital plane, which is likely to be a parabolic arc towards the center of the gravitational pull.


This thread proves to me that we have too much time on our hands....

Trent
November 10, 2012, 08:49 AM
This thread proves to me that we have too much time on our hands....

What the heck else am I supposed to do when I'm covering the Saturday on-call shift and the phone isn't ringing? :)

allaroundhunter
November 10, 2012, 08:53 AM
What the heck else am I supposed to do when I'm covering the Saturday on-call shift and the phone isn't ringing?

Take work with you to the range ;)

Ehtereon11B
November 10, 2012, 09:46 AM
I think you are all forgetting the most important fact of firing a round: combustion. In space there is no oxygen which would make a round not fire very far or not at all. Similar to shooting under water if you negate the buoyancy effect of the water on terminal ballistics.

Tommygunn
November 10, 2012, 11:29 AM
I think you are all forgetting the most important fact of firing a round: combustion. In space there is no oxygen which would make a round not fire very far or not at all. Similar to shooting under water if you negate the buoyancy effect of the water on terminal ballistics.


The oxygen necessary for the ignition and firing of a round of ammo is chemically contained in the gunpowder itself. No outside oxygen is required.

rcmodel
November 10, 2012, 11:43 AM
I think they forgot the effect of the guns recoil too.

If you shot a gun in space, you wouldn't be there later to get shot in the back.

The recoil of the gun would push you away in a new orbit, just like a litttle thruster rocket is used to maneuver a spacecraft.

rc

The M
November 10, 2012, 11:58 AM
You would have to speed up your forward velocity just before firing, so that after the recoil your newly lowered speed is perfect to maintain orbit. Lots of calculations to determine what angle to shoot at to compensate for the speed at trigger pull. Ah good stuff guys...

whanson_wi
November 10, 2012, 08:18 PM
I doubt you could do it on purpose, but Murphy's Law implies you could do it by accident fairly regularly.

Owen Sparks
November 10, 2012, 08:41 PM
In zero gravity the recoil would put the shooter in perpetual rearward motion also.

Archie
November 10, 2012, 08:42 PM
A number of years ago I was thinking about weaponry on space-faring ships. I think 'guns' would work as well as anything.

My brainstorm was to have medium caliber (for cannon) shells to penetrate and detonate, causing rents in the hull structure. A computer system on the ship would fire 'jets' on the opposite side of the ship to balance the recoil and keep the ship stable.

Without gravity, the rounds would fly as true as 'beams'. And possibly be less costly to operate.

It was for a sci-fi story. Details to be solved another day.

pbearperry
November 10, 2012, 08:42 PM
My guess is you would probably hit some space junk.

ExTank
November 10, 2012, 10:04 PM
"The aim has to be perfect," Schultz said."

If you were a cosmonaut you could get this cool three barrel TP-82

"In Soviet Russia, Space Gun Shoots You!"

MachIVshooter
November 11, 2012, 12:47 AM
That would be an awful lot of careful calculation and preparation to commit suicide......

I think I'd just turn the gun around.

(Of course, my method doesn't come with the bragging rights of an epithet saying that you shot yourself from 100,000 miles away.)

FIVETWOSEVEN
November 11, 2012, 12:53 AM
That would be an awful lot of careful calculation and preparation to commit suicide......

Or kill your adversary in a really cheesy Sci Fi movie.


And you'd also have to consider how much you'll get kicked backwards (and consequently, how much your altitude will change) when you fire.


I think they forgot the effect of the guns recoil too.

If you shot a gun in space, you wouldn't be there later to get shot in the back.

The recoil of the gun would push you away in a new orbit, just like a litttle thruster rocket is used to maneuver a spacecraft.

rc
Not to be "that guy" but...

Dnaltrop
November 11, 2012, 02:08 AM
If I manged to fire a gun in space...

There would be one HELL of a Congressional inquiry as to how someone as large, physically infirm, and slow as I am, was able to stow away in one of those teeny-tiny supply capsules to the ISS, with a firearm, completely unnoticed.:D

smalls
November 11, 2012, 02:08 AM
So what's the best caliber for Martians?

rodinal220
November 11, 2012, 10:03 AM
So I could carry my C96 Bolo Mauser pistol and really be Han Bolo?? I could finally put those long range sights to good use.

Trent
November 11, 2012, 12:54 PM
Take work with you to the range ;)

Last time I did that, I didn't hear my cell phone ring (ears were on). One of my coworkers showed up AT THE RANGE with his laptop and fired up a 3G hotspot for me to use it. He made sure I knew this was a "one time event".

The thing is, I didn't even TELL them I was at the range. They just assumed.

Back to the OP, as far as shooting yourself in the back in space, even a very accurate (sub 1 MOA firearm) is going to introduce enough variance in to the initial trajectory to make hitting something the size of a battleship impossible once the projectile circles the Earth one revolution. Let alone a human back. :)

berettaprofessor
November 11, 2012, 01:14 PM
Let's see; you fire the bullet, and since it's now going faster, it achieves a higher orbit or maybe an escape velocity which sends it to Mars (sorry, but not in the mood to do the calculations). It strikes a Martian and now there are interplanetary sanctions against gun ranges in the vicinity of Earth without at least a 10 million mile range and asteroid-sized backstop.


And recoil slows you down and sends you either into a lower orbit or into reentry where you burn up after creating an interplanetary crisis and initiating an assault weapons ban against Earthlings with primitive chemical-based weapons.

MIL-DOT
November 11, 2012, 01:24 PM
How long after the first ever bullet was fired in space, would it take for the .45 vs. 9mil. or AK/AR debates to resurface? :D

barstoolguru
November 11, 2012, 02:10 PM
ray guns sound way cooler as long as you don't get hit by them, after all no one has never shot them self’s in the foot with a ray gun

Rail Driver
November 11, 2012, 02:16 PM
Let's see; you fire the bullet, and since it's now going faster, it achieves a higher orbit or maybe an escape velocity which sends it to Mars (sorry, but not in the mood to do the calculations). It strikes a Martian and now there are interplanetary sanctions against gun ranges in the vicinity of Earth without at least a 10 million mile range and asteroid-sized backstop.


And recoil slows you down and sends you either into a lower orbit or into reentry where you burn up after creating an interplanetary crisis and initiating an assault weapons ban against Earthlings with primitive chemical-based weapons.
That's assuming Martians are anti-gun in the first place - I'd like to think other civilizations have solved those problems.

fdashes
November 11, 2012, 02:26 PM
The most important unlying fact is that....there are no gun laws in space. Anyone can shoot the gun or caliber they want to see what would happen. damn,,there are no whitetials in space...I don't think

Trent
November 11, 2012, 02:30 PM
How long after the first ever bullet was fired in space, would it take for the .45 vs. 9mil. or AK/AR debates to resurface? :D

Well, this would beg the question; which would penetrate a satellite better? 9mm or 45ACP? Say the closing velocity is 3000m/s?

"45, it lets a lot of air out, and a lot of nothing in"

NOLAEMT
November 11, 2012, 03:10 PM
It would be supremely irresponsible... Firing a gun in space.

What happens if you hit the sun? you'll put a hole in it and it'll deflate. Then what will we do for suntans?

Damn Kids:cuss::cuss:

Trent
November 11, 2012, 04:32 PM
But think of the consequences of the Golden Rules?

"Be aware of your target, and what's beyond it?"

In order to answer that question, we need to boldly go where no man has gone before...

Just One Shot
November 12, 2012, 01:20 PM
If I were to ever find myself firing a gun in space I wouldn't have to worry about the projectile hitting me in the back. I wouldn't be in the same location for long as I would be creating plenty of forward thrust by releasing the internal pressure built up in my bowel from being extremely nervous about my location. :D

vito
November 12, 2012, 01:44 PM
This thread has been highly educational, and I will sure to remember it the next time I happen to find myself in space, have to overcome a threat, and somehow can figure out how to draw my gun from my IWB holster and get it outside of my space suit. The real questions are:
- will a gun work on zombies in space?
- if I could only have ONE gun when I go into space, what would it be?
- which works better against space aliens, 9mm or 40S&W?
- do they make camo space suits for when I want to go visit the space mall?

Pete D.
November 13, 2012, 07:07 AM
Will a firearm work in a vacuum?

Pete

Never mind....found the answer in an earlier post

230RN
November 13, 2012, 02:54 PM
What sights for shooting in space? Iron: Peep, Patridge. Buckhorn? Optical: 'Scope, Red Dot? Laser?

How much would you have to "hold off" to account for the solar wind?

(Image: "Stalking the notorious Horsehead Nebula.")

I'm not signing this one so nobody will know who posted it.

481
November 13, 2012, 03:20 PM
I'm not signing this one so nobody will know who posted it.

Yes, your secret is safe with us. ;)

Haxby
November 14, 2012, 05:21 PM
I think they forgot the effect of the guns recoil too.
If you shot a gun in space, you wouldn't be there later to get shot in the back.
You have to figure the lead.

So what's the best caliber for Martians?
Martians aren't hard to kill. Shot placement is everything.

camo space suits
Black with sequins.

What sights for shooting in space?
Get a Leupold and don't look back. The bullet might be coming around.

littlebluevette
November 14, 2012, 05:24 PM
You can't shoot a gun in space because the powder will not ingite without oxygen.

Sam Cade
November 14, 2012, 05:42 PM
You can't shoot a gun in space because the powder will not ingite without oxygen.


Once more, the powder contains its own oxidizer.

littlebluevette
November 14, 2012, 05:46 PM
but the primer won't work without oxygen? Just asking....

NOLAEMT
November 14, 2012, 05:51 PM
no outside oxygen required...

the primer and powder carry all the oxygen they need bound in chemical form.

Sam Cade
November 14, 2012, 05:53 PM
but the primer won't work without oxygen? Just asking....

It will work just fine. It is a self contained chemical reaction.

Conventional firearms will also fire under water.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJTi2TjR1UQ&feature=related

Tinpig
November 14, 2012, 06:00 PM
Ask him:
http://www.xrayfilms.net/attic_blog/vintage/space_patrol_kid.jpg
You know he grew up to be a THR member.
If he was a Commander then he's probably a Moderator by now.
:)

Tinpig

chris in va
November 14, 2012, 08:15 PM
I always wondered if you could make multiple meteors by firing a FA machine gun at the Earth. Maybe make the bullets out of tungsten?

Steel Horse Rider
November 14, 2012, 11:24 PM
Tinpig: Now THAT is funny!!!!! :D

sawdeanz
November 14, 2012, 11:47 PM
I thought shooting a rifle with muffs on was difficult, imagine doing it with a space helmet on.

gunnutery
November 15, 2012, 01:32 AM
Supposedly the Russians never fired the gun in the OP. So I guess we'll never know exactly what it's like to shoot a gun in space. I'm guessing the Cosmonauts were under strict orders not to shoot it unless it was a life and death situation. Otherwise who wouldn't be curious enough to shoot it, gun guy or not?

Sam Cade
November 15, 2012, 01:48 AM
. So I guess we'll never know exactly what it's like to shoot a gun in space. I'm guessing the Cosmonauts were under strict orders not to shoot it unless it was a life and death situation.

Salyut-3 supposedly had a 23mm NS-23 autocannon that worked just fine.

Sam Cade
November 15, 2012, 01:59 AM
Plugging in some numbers and assuming that the recoil was delivered along the central axis, a man wearing an EVA suit (figure about 350 lbs in 1G) firing the equivalent of a single 55gr 5.56mm round would be propelled rearward at the blistering speed of .68 mph.

Sav .250
November 15, 2012, 07:41 AM
A nerd might find that of interest but I`ll bet most might being thinking, who cares or at the very least, how is that going to enrich my life?

Sam Cade
November 15, 2012, 01:50 PM
A nerd might find that of interest but I`ll bet most might being thinking, who cares or at the very least, how is that going to enrich my life?

In order to maximize your enjoyment, I'd recommend you not read threads that don't interest you.

Devonai
November 15, 2012, 03:29 PM
In my novels, the Reckless Faith (http://www.amazon.com/Reckless-Faith-David-Kantrowitz/dp/0741419858/) series, the protagonists have to build a ship using advanced alien technology. However, they have to provide many of their own systems, including weaponry. So they steal a couple of GAU 8/A and GAU 19/A weapons systems from the US military and install them as fixed and articulated positions, respectively.

The ship also has simple force field technology, not enough to provide protection from other weapons but powerful enough to keep the vacuum of space at bay. Those fields are used to protect the parts of their weapons systems that protrude from the hull, not to keep the ammo oxygenated, but to keep them warm. I wouldn't give those hydraulic systems much of a chance at -460 F.

For simplicity's sake, the ballistics of these weapons are pretty much point-of-aim, point-of-impact. Any minor variances in trajectory due to gravitational forces are automatically calculated by the ship's computer.

I researched air-to-air missiles extensively for my book, but I couldn't find any conclusive evidence that they'd work in space. As far-fetched as the story is, I didn't want to include anything that was simply impossible. So, no missiles for the good guys.

A nerd might find that of interest but I`ll bet most might being thinking, who cares or at the very least, how is that going to enrich my life?

In order to maximize your enjoyment, I'd recommend you not read threads that don't interest you.

Ditto.

Doc3402
November 15, 2012, 04:03 PM
What would happen if you shot a gun in space?

If you aimed it just right you'd end up with a bullet hole in your asteroid.

Sig Bill
November 15, 2012, 04:44 PM
The aliens must be anti-gun, have you seen any packing? :p

Shooting a bullet out toward space will be just like the energizer rabbit, it keeps going, going, going, going...

357Shooter
November 15, 2012, 06:13 PM
Angry Birds Space will not only answer all your concerns but will also allow you endless hours of practice!

k_dawg
November 15, 2012, 06:27 PM
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SEsVh6Ws8Wc/TZEpcf7LN5I/AAAAAAAAATU/oQohKl0VHxo/s1600/SpaceBattle.JPG

*pew* *pew* *pew pew pew*

tightgroup tiger
November 15, 2012, 06:55 PM
Tech Ninja, I absolutely loved that article. Thanks for posting it!

Doc3402
November 15, 2012, 07:04 PM
Just a thought, but would a 1911 perform as well as a Glock in space? I only ask because of the faster twist of the Glock.

Coop45
November 15, 2012, 07:09 PM
Since there are no whitetail herds in space, how about tofu deer to shoot at?

CountryUgly
November 15, 2012, 07:11 PM
I love these kinds of threads! It brings out the nerds and gives me a good indicator of who to direct future "over my head" questions to :) All the "egg heads" stand up and take a bow! You're all rockstars in my book ;)

Sam Cade
November 15, 2012, 07:20 PM
Just a thought, but would a 1911 perform as well as a Glock in space? I only ask because of the faster twist of the Glock.

The 1911 would work better. Mostly because the glock would either shatter or be melted.

In earth orbit you are going to be dealing with temperature ranges of -160ēC to well over 200ēC.
The nylon glock frame melts at 260ēC or so.


http://www.amazon.com/Mission-Analysis-Design-Technology-Library/dp/1881883108

Doc3402
November 15, 2012, 07:28 PM
That answer makes so much sense that the 1911 vs. Glock can of worms will have to remain closed this time. I guess I'll have to resort to the old pistol vs revolver ploy.

Just kidding folks. Step away from the can opener.

Seriously though, in a vacuum would rate of spin make a difference? I'm guessing no since there would be no outside influence besides minimal gravity, but I'm not sure.

CAR-AR
November 15, 2012, 07:34 PM
I'd want to borrow the Stainless Steel Rat's 75 caliber pistol for this job!:neener:

AethelstanAegen
November 15, 2012, 07:54 PM
Supposedly the Russians never fired the gun in the OP. So I guess we'll never know exactly what it's like to shoot a gun in space. I'm guessing the Cosmonauts were under strict orders not to shoot it unless it was a life and death situation. Otherwise who wouldn't be curious enough to shoot it, gun guy or not?

The TP-82 (the gun in the OP's pic) wasn't really intended for space but mostly to help the crew survive (if need be) on touchdown, since the capsules often landed in remote sections of Siberia.

230RN
November 16, 2012, 06:09 AM
Mullifications:

A slightly less rifling twist is "needed" in a vacuum because the twist rate required depends on the density of the medium the bullet is going through.

The difference between the density of air (1.0) and the density of a vacuum (zero) is so minimal it would not be necessary to change the rifling twist.

And anyhow, the "calculations" for rifling twist are only approximations --quoting an exact number is unnnecessary, especially since other factors like the form and length and material of the bullet are more important.

In "practice" (heh-heh) all the factors involving orbital speed would cancel out for a shooter and a target in essentially the same orbit for practical ranges and the shooting would pretty much be a straight line affair except possibly for "lead," with no drop calculations needed. In other words, the sights should line up exactly with the axis of the bore to make a hit. The velocity of the bullet in a vacuum would be slightly greater because the bullet does not have to push a column of air out the barrel ahead of it.

For a bullet fired straight "ahead" in the orbit, the projectile would seek a higher orbit and probably continue to orbit in a more elliptical orbit. The chances of getting hit by your own bullet are almost nonexistent, considering the errors involved accumulating over the well-over 25,000 mile flight around the full orbit. For a bullet fired "backward" in the orbit, the bullet would seek a lower orbit. However, this lower orbit might intersect with the earth. Or at least be slowed by the atmosphere and burn up.

If that bullet could be fired "backward" at exactly the orbital velocity, it would fall straight down to the earth, but I know of no gun which can fire at any low earth orbital velocities.

Fun mulling it over, huh?

Terry

Bovice
November 16, 2012, 07:28 PM
You know if you fart in space, you'll move!

Coop45
November 16, 2012, 08:40 PM
Are there a lot of Taco Bells in space?

gunnutery
November 17, 2012, 06:59 AM
The TP-82 (the gun in the OP's pic) wasn't really intended for space but mostly to help the crew survive (if need be) on touchdown, since the capsules often landed in remote sections of Siberia.

I was aware of that, but it was still with them in space. You know the thought HAD to at least run through their head once..."what if...?"

il.bill
November 17, 2012, 11:02 AM
My guess is you would probably hit some space junk.
With a straight face I would then state: "That is what I was aiming at!"

il.bill
November 17, 2012, 11:05 AM
Ask him:
http://www.xrayfilms.net/attic_blog/vintage/space_patrol_kid.jpg
You know he grew up to be a THR member.
If he was a Commander then he's probably a Moderator by now.
:)

Tinpig
I am so glad that I had already swallowed that gulp of coffee before seeing your post.

AethelstanAegen
November 17, 2012, 02:48 PM
I was aware of that, but it was still with them in space. You know the thought HAD to at least run through their head once..."what if...?"

Haha. Yeah, I know it would run through my mind as well.

berettaprofessor
November 17, 2012, 06:26 PM
If you aimed it just right you'd end up with a bullet hole in your asteroid.

You know, some of you guys/gals are pretty funny.:D

cauldron
November 18, 2012, 03:39 AM
no projectile spin needed, as the projectile has nothing to act upon it and make it tumble, and it should 'fly' just as straight sideways as nose first.

a 1911 would be better for the cold, but... at about 3 degrees Kelvin, the metal slide and frame will 'cold weld' along with all the other metal parts. Unless there is a thin layer of oxidation. So no oil, and a little rust is good! Also the oil will either boil off, freeze, or evaporate anyway...

Firing from the hip, (aligning recoil with your center of gravity) will come back into style, as anything else would cause the person to spin.

'space junk' now includes brass cases... at what speed?? 30 feet per second?

After you shoot a whole magazine, the gun stays very hot. Maybe for days.

So... a smoothbore blackpowder rusty sixshooter fired from the hip is the perfect space gun! At least no ear plugs are needed.

CPerdue
November 18, 2012, 05:26 PM
I was waiting for someone to mention heat. Air cools guns on earth, in space they have to radiate (mostly).

I'm betting the sloppy, beat-up old AK would work longer than the gun with tight tolerances. There are lubes that work in space.

Also, brass/gasses ejecting sideways will cause you to spin. I expect some very fancy muzzle breaks may help with that.

Sam Cade
November 18, 2012, 06:02 PM
I was waiting for someone to mention heat. Air cools guns on earth, in space they have to radiate (mostly).


Yup. Firearms would get hot and STAY hot.




I'm betting the sloppy, beat-up old AK would work longer than the gun with tight tolerances.

Clearances.

AKMtnRunner
November 18, 2012, 10:23 PM
You better make sure to load your ammo in outer space too, because if loaded down here, the pressure inside the loaded round may be enough to prematurely eject the bullet. I hate it when that happens.

Redlg155
November 19, 2012, 01:37 PM
Why all the fuss about shooting? I dare say you could do more damage jousting with knitting needles in outer space.

cauldron
November 19, 2012, 02:23 PM
Redlg155, You sir, are no fun, and are not invited to our next dinosaur hunt. :neener:

14 psi might be too much pressure, and unseat the projectile. Yet another reason to use a black powder six shooter, and load once one is in space.

CPerdue
November 19, 2012, 07:53 PM
Nope. 14 psi and .50 only gives 2.75 lbf. You can pull harder than that by hand.

Redlg155
November 19, 2012, 08:45 PM
So you are saying, if you pull my finger in space...

Poper
November 19, 2012, 10:08 PM
You would have to speed up your forward velocity just before firing, so that after the recoil your newly lowered speed is perfect to maintain orbit.But what if you were orbiting with your back to the direction of your orbital travel? Wouldn't the recoil increase your orbital speed and the velocity of the fired bullet be less? :evil:

ETA: researched air-to-air missiles extensively for my book, but I couldn't find any conclusive evidence that they'd work in space. As far-fetched as the story is, I didn't want to include anything that was simply impossible. So, no missiles for the good guys.But you could have given them rockets similar to the Shuttle's booster rockets which are solid fuel rockets and include oxidizer(s) in the solid fuel make up. Just a thought.....


Poper

Sam Cade
November 20, 2012, 03:00 AM
ETA:But you could have given them rockets similar to the Shuttle's booster rockets which are solid fuel rockets and include oxidizer(s) in the solid fuel make up. Just a thought.....


Nearly all modern air to air missiles are solid fuel rockets but those engines aren't designed to operate in the temperature extremes of space. Also, they use airfoils to maneuver...

Air to Space guided missile weapons DO exist though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASM-135_ASAT

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/ASAT_missile_launch.jpg

Devonai
November 20, 2012, 08:36 PM
I thought of that, too, but the main characters in the first novel have to steal most of the weapons they use. None of them were capable of designing or manufacturing either rockets or missiles. If NASA had gotten involved then I'm sure they might have come up with something potentially useful... assuming the ship survives long enough to deploy it. :evil:

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