Help AMT Automag III short cycling issue


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Rod4277
November 10, 2012, 05:06 PM
I previously posted here for this issue. I have done some additional experiments as detailed below and still have the same issue.

History: I recently purchased an AMT Automag III (30 Carbine) in like new condition. My first Inspection of the pistol indicated it may never been fired and there was evidence of old dried up lubricant. Initially the pistol was difficult to disassemble and reassemble. We gave the pistol some TLC to resolve these issues. Please see my previous thread (Help! - Long slide short cycling) for my pictures.


Let’s get to the short-cycling issue:
First there are no ejection or feed problems. In a firing sequence insert the magazine > manually cycle the slide > safety off > fire > spent shell ejects > next round chambers > if you attempt to pull the trigger the hammer does not drop and the gun does not fire > If you apply a little pressure pulling back the hammer a very little bit you feel a click > pulling the trigger fires the pistol. This is the same every attempt. If you simply complete the hammer cycle manually it fires every time.

Troubleshooting:

Tried several brands of ammo

Polished slide mating surfaces and generous lubrication

Decreased the length of the recoil spring. Weakening this spring should make it easier for the slide to travel further and fully cycle the hammer back.
1. I purchased two brand new springs.
2. I gradually cut coils off the spring and test fired between each cut. I found that when cutting 7 – 8 coils off the spring that the recoil rod did not have enough tension to keep it fully engaged with the barrel lug and it protruded through the recoil rod bushing. Of course we did not attempt firing the pistol with this spring. We re-cut one of the new springs by removing 6 coils.

More observations:
• When the last round in the magazine the slide locks open every time. This is even before cutting the recoil spring. So I’m thinking I may be going the wrong direction.
• Not the pictures included of the recoil rod springs. The longer one is a brand new one and the shorter on is the original one before I cut coils off of it. I found that when you install a brand new spring the spring takes a set and after awhile looks just like the shorter one.
• Some on one of the forums suggested cutting the hammer springs. The hammer spring tension does not seem all that strong to me as compared to my 1911 45’s. I would not want to decrease hammer spring tension and cause misfires. This would be a much worse problem.

I’m looking for advice here and a good pistol smith. I live in a rural area in North Florida and haven’t found anyone here.

The gun is awesome to shoot and the long slide with that long site radius makes it easy to shoot accurately. I will have a real gem here if I can cure the short-cycle problem.

All advice welcome!

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243winxb
November 10, 2012, 05:39 PM
Sounds like a disconnector problem.

243winxb
November 12, 2012, 04:06 PM
Any luck finding the problem? When u move the hammer that extra 1/8" this may move the sear, allowing the disconnectory to snap into place. Make sure the trigger is moving to its farthers forward position & the trigger return spring is doing it job correctly. I should add , i dont own one & not a gun smith. So take it for what its worth. :)

Rod4277
November 12, 2012, 07:15 PM
243Winxb, Thanks for the advice! I think you on the right track and I'm looking for a gun smith get this corrected.

Rod4277
January 5, 2013, 06:37 PM
I found a gunsmith willing to take a look at this problem for me. His description of this type of problem is a "reset" issue. He's real busy right now as it is still hunting season here. I expect to hear from him in a couple more weeks.

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