Non-Supressed Supressor as a Muzzle Brake?


PDA






barnbwt
November 10, 2012, 09:56 PM
I've read that suppressors greatly reduce recoil, even in supersonic rounds, but the noise reduction they are designed for causes them to be regulated. Has anyone tried to develop a muzzle device that is essentially a suppressor perforated with holes to ensure it yields the same volume as a non-modified barrel? Or would such a device no longer reduce recoil significantly (i.e. no free lunch:()?

It seems like this would give the shooter reduced recoil, while avoiding the blast inherent to most muzzle brakes which precludes their use without hearing protection (not that any firearm should be discharged sans 'muffs, but I'm speaking of a trail defense rifle, whose shooter may not have fair warning). Would such a device still need to be regulated by BATFE (even if the holes can't easily be plugged to make it a full-on silencer)?

TCB

If you enjoyed reading about "Non-Supressed Supressor as a Muzzle Brake?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Rail Driver
November 11, 2012, 01:14 AM
I've read that suppressors greatly reduce recoil, even in supersonic rounds, but the noise reduction they are designed for causes them to be regulated. Has anyone tried to develop a muzzle device that is essentially a suppressor perforated with holes to ensure it yields the same volume as a non-modified barrel? Or would such a device no longer reduce recoil significantly (i.e. no free lunch:()?

It seems like this would give the shooter reduced recoil, while avoiding the blast inherent to most muzzle brakes which precludes their use without hearing protection (not that any firearm should be discharged sans 'muffs, but I'm speaking of a trail defense rifle, whose shooter may not have fair warning). Would such a device still need to be regulated by BATFE (even if the holes can't easily be plugged to make it a full-on silencer)?

TCB
They make muzzle brakes for that. There are some designs that direct the muzzle blast away from the shooter.

Gato MontÚs
November 11, 2012, 02:14 AM
Does a silencer dampen recoil? Sure, but I don't think it has anything to do with its inherent design rather a side effect of throwing all that weight on the end of the gun. Could be wrong though.

That being said, you could always buy a fake can and screw that onto the end of your barrel and see how that works.

xxhaxx
November 11, 2012, 05:48 AM
Recoil is momentum of the projectile and exhaust gasses. Since a silencer allows the gas to expand when it enters the baffle the exiting gas velocity is lowered. Slower moving gas less recoil.

barnbwt
November 11, 2012, 11:50 AM
Recoil is momentum of the projectile and exhaust gasses. Since a silencer allows the gas to expand when it enters the baffle the exiting gas velocity is lowered. Slower moving gas less recoil.

Interesting. Though I suppose by not directing the gas backward, you can only reduce recoil somewhat, as opposed to eliminating it (like with a brake). I was thinking about this concept with regards to an integrally-suppressed type setup using barrel ports. You could get a reduced-recoil performance without massive concussion or long/fragile muzzle extensions that can snag on stuff (or be feared by politicians :rolleyes:). Even better, there'd be no chance of baffle strike (no baffles) and even full-power supersonic loads could be safely shot, right?

And I suppose the perforated "noisy" barrel shroud could be replaced with an intact one (with proper stamps) for a suppressed configuration. I wouldn't think the BATFE would think that'd be more easily converted than any gun with a threaded barrel, right?

TCB

jmorris
November 11, 2012, 12:00 PM
Some designs like the onee below would make for an effective brake without its outer tube. The ease of "converting" it to a real silencer would make it a no no in the eyes of the NFA branch. Kind of like thed original fake cans on the GSG .22's.


http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/can/DSC02201.jpg

Zak Smith
November 19, 2012, 01:50 AM
The suppressor captures the momentum of the exhaust gases (pulling the rifle against recoil), pauses them, and the more slowly releases the exhaust gas outs its muzzle (and the breech if it's open by this time).

If you enjoyed reading about "Non-Supressed Supressor as a Muzzle Brake?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!