Which 45-70 lever action?


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guitarguy314
November 12, 2012, 12:46 AM
Hey guys!

I am looking to buy a 45/70 lever action rifle, but I don't know what to get. I have heard used Marlin's are my best bet, but are there any others?

As a first time rifle buyer, is there anything I should know/look for?

Note: I have shot a 45/70 before, and my dad has a few .22's, so I have a little experience with rifles, just not a ton.

Thanks guys,

Lucas

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MachIVshooter
November 12, 2012, 01:01 AM
There are others, but the Marlin is the gold standard. They are the toughest lever action you'll find South of 4 figures.

guitarguy314
November 12, 2012, 01:17 AM
How old of a marlin should I look for? I heard that newer ones have quality control issues.

CraigC
November 12, 2012, 01:21 AM
The 1886 is the strongest, smoothest and most refined levergun available. They are also commonly found under four figures for used guns. Look for Brownings and late model Winchesters. I passed on a really nice used Browning last year for $750. Marlins are good guns as well.

grubbylabs
November 12, 2012, 02:10 AM
No amount of internet hype will replace hands on inspections. I fondled several Marlins before I found one I was happy with. You should cycle the action a few times and in general get a feel for the gun and its fit and finish before you buy. I found that quite a few of the guns I inspected were very stiff. Its hard when you are getting a new style of gun you are not familiar with, but with a little research and effort you should find something worth buying. I personally am very happy with my Marlin. However with any thing, there would not be this much hype if there were not some truth in there somewhere.

clocker
November 12, 2012, 02:50 AM
I fell in love with a Marlin 1895SBL and had to take it home as my first lever. If you want to go a little older style, Marlin had a 45-70 in their guide gun which was also very nice.

If you are into reloading, you'll notice three different loads
1. 1873 Springfield Trapdoor - lightest
2. 1886 Winchester and 1895 Marlin - pretty stout
3. Ruger no. 1 and no. 3 - Big thumper

Make sure that you work the action and also check the brand forums for additional information. Buying new is probably your best bet for a first rifle, but you'll probably find the best deals and the best quality on the used market. In general people don't put a lot of rounds through 45-70 rifles :) Oh and pick up a box of Hornady Leverevolution if you want to have some fun :evil:

guitarguy314
November 13, 2012, 10:18 PM
I have been looking at the Marlin 1895 cowboy model. Is this a good gun? How much should I pay for it? I saw one on GB for 700 (at least that was the bid).

I did notice however, that it was a side eject.

Anyone know who makes a lever action 45-70 that top ejects?

StrawHat
November 14, 2012, 02:18 PM
I have been looking at the Marlin 1895 cowboy model. Is this a good gun? How much should I pay for it? I saw one on GB for 700 (at least that was the bid).

I did notice however, that it was a side eject.

Anyone know who makes a lever action 45-70 that top ejects?
The Winchester 1886 and copies of it, eject out the top of the action.

grubbylabs
November 14, 2012, 03:15 PM
The cowboy is a good gun it is a side ejection, most people prefer it over a top ejection. In my area 800 bucks will buy you one if you can find one, and they are hard to find.

critter
November 14, 2012, 03:33 PM
Awesome game getter is that 45-70. Mine is a Ruger #1 though.

joecil
November 14, 2012, 04:20 PM
I recently picked up a Rossi Rio Grande in 45-70. Excellent fit and finish on the exterior and nearly perfect on the inside with no machining marks and one minor burr that took a pass with some metal polish to remove. Only other problem was very hard loading door but also easily fixed. Nothing else required to do on mine and bought new in the box at Bud's for $437 + 6% sales tax out the door. Added a Bushnell Banner 1.5 - 4.5 x 32mm scope..

Rexster
November 14, 2012, 11:15 PM
I love my Ruger No. 1 .45-70, but then, the OP probably wants a lever-action repeater. If a single-shot is OK, the Ruger No. 1 is pure elegance, with a stock design that mitigates recoil well. (Beware the similar-looking No. 3; I read/hear its stock can result in brutal recoil.)

jgiehl
November 15, 2012, 03:33 AM
I have a Marlin and love it. But Henry now makes a .45-70 and that little guy has piqued my interest.

T.R.
November 15, 2012, 09:23 AM
Rossi Rio Grande is a keeper!

TR

CraigC
November 15, 2012, 11:11 AM
That Henry .45/70 is even uglier than their other ugly rifles. Who is in charge of designing that stuff???

musicman10_1
November 15, 2012, 12:05 PM
I have only seen the Henry .45-70 in their catalog (looked a little rough). I have tried to find it on the shelf of my local Henry dealers and at gunshows but it does not seem to exist in my world.

I have a Marlin with a JM stamp on the barrel and I like it a lot. I do like the SBL version of the Guide Gun and would not hesitate to buy one if I could get my hands on it for an inspection to insure that none of the reported problems with new factory assembly were present.

Hit_Factor
November 15, 2012, 12:24 PM
Marlin would probably fix any assembly problems for free, even if you are not original owner. Maybe give them a call and ask, this could could you more options.

I have a 1895 Guide gun for hunting, being a Marlin I can reload them hotter. But not as hot as the gentleman with the Ruger #1 who posted earlier.

Sent by someone using something.

Cocked & Locked
November 15, 2012, 01:15 PM
Marlin Guide Gun is a great choice...at least I think so. :scrutiny:

This is one the earlier ones that has the factory ported barrel. Some folks say the noise from the ports make it unpleasant to shoot as compared to the non-ported later ones. I've not found that to be an issue.

I've never heard the BANG when shooting at a deer. For fun shooting I use muffs anyway.

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/17383006/393403309.jpg

cpt-t
November 15, 2012, 01:56 PM
guitarguy314: My Son and I have 3 Markin 1895 CW`s between us, and have had them for quite a while. Bought all three of them used but they were in like new shape. We don`t buy a lot of new guns. They are our Cowboy Action big bore lever guns all have the 26in barrels on them. But I use mine to pig hunt with when I think the shots will be 150 yds or less. We have several Marlin Lever Guns from the 22lr 39-A`s to a 450 Marlin Guide Gun. We have never had a problem with any of our Mariin`s. We thank the old Marlins are the best choice for us. Always on the look out for a nice used one, and we are going to look at one this weekend. The 3 1895`s I spoke of are all in 45/70 we reload for this caliber and you can load it light for comfort or you can load it where I find it is getting uncomfortable to shoot very many time in a row. But with the 45/70 you can hunt any thing on four legs with the right loads, and the Marlin will shoot any factory load I have tried. And normaly if I shoot something with my 45/70 Marlin the animal with be DRT or with in a few yards of where I shot it. If I were you I would look for an old model Marlin that says JM on the left side of the barrel just in front of the the reciver. If I could help you in any way, it would be my pleasure.
ken

guitarguy314
November 16, 2012, 12:39 AM
Thanks for all of the replies guys!

I know I want a 45-70 lever action. But I keep looking, and it's hard to choose.

I'd like to stick with a well known company like Marlin, Winchester, or Browning. No offense to rossi, but I'm not really counting them as an option.

The guide gun seems weird to me. I think just because the magazine tube stops before the barrel does. I would prefer a rifle that has a capacity of at least 6 (the 1895CB boasts 9...that's a lot). I also really like checkering on the guide gun. So, I'm conflicted. Shorter does mean easier to shoot... But I hate how obtrusive the butt pad looks. I'm sure it helps a lot with recoil, but I really wanted something with a minimal or no pad.

All blathering aside...

CPT-T Thanks so much! I will definitely pm you soon.

snakeman
November 16, 2012, 12:42 AM
Marlin for sure bud. I prefer the plain 1895 but most favor the guide gun.

CraigC
November 16, 2012, 12:49 AM
I love how the Cowboy feels and balances but I really think the standard 1895SS is the best configuration Marlin offers in the chambering.

grubbylabs
November 16, 2012, 09:41 AM
I bought a regular 1895 and had a mag tube extension put on it. For less than 150 my smith was able to buy the tube from brownels and do all the smith work. it now holds close to 10 if I remember correctly. I might be able to post some pics today if you want.

eastbank
November 16, 2012, 10:06 AM
my first year marlin 1895 made in 1973 with ther serial number B001920, and its a deer killer.and my 1973 marlin 94 in .44mag sporter, they look alot alike with only the lenth of the action and calibures being different. eastbank.

Frosty Z06
November 18, 2012, 05:49 AM
I've got the cowboy with the Octagon Barrel. I believe it's a 9 shot. That is the primary reason I got it, well that and the VERY long barrel. Glad I didn't get the guide gun. Love the look and the barrel length!

rodinal220
November 18, 2012, 10:10 AM
Older Marlins. Remington Arms Company in December 26, 2007 entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Marlin Firearms Company, Inc. ("Marlin"). Guns after 2008 "can" be suspect in QC,especially after Marlin workers found out that the Marlin plant was to be shut down and operations moved to Ilion NY.
Guns closer to the move date and those coming out of the Remington plant are the most suspect.

I recently examined several 336 30-30s and 35 Remington's and several new 45-70 GG and they were terrible in fit and finish.The walnut is almost dry looking and void of any life. Numerous gaps in wood to metal fit. Numerous tool marks and amateurish fitting of simple parts.

guitarguy314
November 18, 2012, 07:08 PM
Thanks for posting the pictures eastbank. Those sure are pretty. Did you do anything to the stocks, or did they come that shiny?

Frosty Z06: That's the one I was looking at getting. It is calling my name. How is the recoil? How is the weight? What year is yours? Do you mind if I ask you where you got it and how much you paid?

rodinal220: I have heard that about Marlin's before. My problem is, that unless by some miracle a pawn shop gets one in, I will have to order from Gun Broker. I'll be careful about those dates. If they started making new ones, do you think that they would be okay?

Thanks guys!

krinko
November 18, 2012, 11:21 PM
Just to keep the 1886 in the picture, so to speak...

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL165/1109208/8312249/402961733.jpg

Got this Browning at an Omaha pawn shop for $700---it's the rifle I wanted in 1966, but could not find. Sort of a bucket list thing.
-----krinko

gunner69
November 18, 2012, 11:55 PM
If you plan on mounting optics go with one of the Marlins, if your are going to shoot irons the Browing/Winchester/Taylor 1886 style action. You won't find a smoother action than the 1886. Try some of the Hornady leveralution (sumpin' like that) loads and you will be ready for whatever shows up.

guitarguy314
November 19, 2012, 02:51 PM
Krinko: Whoa. That browning is a beauty. How many does it hold? Any idea how much a used one would go for today?

Gunner69: I don't plan on scoping mine at all, but aren't winchester's and browning's really expensive nowadays? Never heard of Taylor.

CraigC
November 19, 2012, 03:22 PM
Modern Winchesters and Brownings do cost more but they are also much better built guns than Marlins. You will not find a better made levergun. They are already drilled & tapped for a receiver sight. Like I said before, I passed on a really nice Browning 1886 SRC for $750 last year. Which is in range of a Marlin 1895 Cowboy model.

shafter
November 19, 2012, 04:06 PM
That Henry .45/70 is even uglier than their other ugly rifles. Who is in charge of designing that stuff???

Probably someone who thinks that if they use enough shiny brass people with think it's a decendent of the original Civil War era Henry.

CraigC
November 19, 2012, 05:09 PM
Methinks that's what they're banking on. Few look deep enough to find out that the current Henry Repeating Arms company has nothing to do with Benjamin Tyler Henry. Even so, all he really did was improve the Volcanic design for Winchester.

eastbank
November 19, 2012, 05:52 PM
guitarguy, a light coat of howards wax-n-feed and hand buffed,i use it quite a lot on my rifle and shotgun stocks. eastbank.

guitarguy314
November 21, 2012, 01:13 AM
Well guys, you've convinced me. My goal is a browning 1886. I have a few questions though. I'm probably going to have to buy from gunbroker. A search for browning 1886 reveals seven rifles that are way out of my price range, and one at 1100. Keep in mind I don't mind a used gun, as long as it works and looks nice. How much should expect to pay ?

Also, I don't actually want an antique gun. How long ago did browning stop making them?
(sorry if this is a dumb question)

gunner69
November 22, 2012, 02:34 AM
If you can find one get the Browning modern rendition, a second choice would be the Japanese made Winchester model. Note that Jap Winchester added a tang safety, which is o.k., based on their lawyer(s) safety recommendation. I like my Winchester, but would have liked the Browning a lot better. Try Ebang.com, Guns America, as well as Gun Broker. I have seen new, and as new, 1886's for around $1,000 - $1,000 and Good Luck.

guitarguy314
November 22, 2012, 04:30 PM
Thanks gunner69, and happy thanksgiving!

How do I tell a browning modern rendition from an old one? (besides price?)

Thanks, I haven't heard of those first two!

CraigC
November 23, 2012, 12:18 AM
The Browning will be marked "Browning" and the original will be marked Winchester. It will probably also cost twice as much. I agree that the Brownings are the best of the bunch, being of a traditional action without a goofy safety. Although those late model Winchester Extra Lights really call to me.

guitarguy314
November 25, 2012, 12:09 AM
I agree, those lever gun safety's seem silly. How long ago did they stop making these rifles?

Extra light?! on a 45-70? Ouch.

CraigC
November 25, 2012, 01:49 AM
I think Browning stopped producing the 1886's by the 1990's. In this case "Extra Light" is a relative term. It still weighs about 8lbs. ;)

guitarguy314
November 25, 2012, 04:33 PM
Okay, so not too old then. Thanks

Oh, I see. haha

krinko
November 25, 2012, 05:18 PM
"Krinko: Whoa. That browning is a beauty. How many does it hold? Any idea how much a used one would go for today?"

The rifle has a 26" full octagon barrel and the tube holds eight rounds.
I got the thing this year for the $700 I mentioned.
I failed to mention, however, that one of the other regulars offered me $1000 for it, as I headed for the door of the shop.

And it was made by Miroku in Japan, just like the Winchester 1895 Saddle-ring
Carbine I bought this October.
There is no safety on the Miroku '86, just the regular half-cock.
-----krinko

guitarguy314
December 9, 2012, 01:10 AM
So guys, my research has confused me. What is the difference between the saddle ring carbine, and the regular lever action? What is the difference between the winchester 1886 and the browning 1886? Is a grade 1 rifle just a mint condition one? I need schooled. Thanks for the help guys. ((Also I apologize for resurrecting the thread))

DMH
December 9, 2012, 02:54 AM
I'm no expert, but hope this will help. The Browning and Winchester 1886 rifles are very similar. With the differences being in the safeties, when present and date of manufacture along with where they where made. The Browning 1886 for the 1990's has no tang safety, the Winchesters early ones from Japan also had no tang safety, then later ones where equipped with the tang safety. I also think Browning may have released a model 1886 in 1986 as a 100 year special run. Those also I believe would not have a tang safety. If you go used and find an original Winchester 1886 those where made in USA up to 1932. Saddle Ring Carbines (SRC) are shorter 20" Barrels, but I have never seen a 1886 SRC, but who am I to say. The Winchester 1985 was available in SRC, but that's a different rifle. The Marlin 1895 is also different. Here are some photos to help.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-flM4gwBYZdc/UJbmcOCQ2LI/AAAAAAAAB98/fsDXZNZoWgs/s720/IMG_1891.JPG
Winchester 1886 in 45-70 half cock safety.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-RlAi1ClnMLc/UJbmgMnzmfI/AAAAAAAAB-s/SLnWN9S9E8I/s1152/IMG_1897.JPG
Winchester 1886 in 45-70 half cock safety.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-_wFo77NsV20/UJbmZSGgW0I/AAAAAAAAB9U/dmCRMuNNHsA/s720/IMG_1886.JPG
1895 Winchester made in Japan w/tang safety.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-bQriORPhMXU/UJbmMHnkJ7I/AAAAAAAAB6I/5fBw3k8NXZc/s1152/IMG_1854.JPG
Winchester SRC 20" Barrel in 30-30.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ZJWJfG-e9DY/UJbmEd-E7WI/AAAAAAAAB4g/8PQ14PZvFW0/s1152/IMG_1841.JPG
Winchester SRC in .32 Winchester Special.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-spCSmuPgeKY/UJbl1QdbruI/AAAAAAAAB1U/FoAcrHPzGV0/s1152/IMG_1816.JPG
Marlin 1895 in 45-70 with cross bolt safety.


DMH

DurangoKid
December 9, 2012, 03:29 AM
The Browning Mdl. 1886 was made in a limited number of rifles and SRC Mdls. The Mdl.1886 Brownings did not have the "Idiot" switch on the tang. The Brownings and Winchester were both produced by the Japan contractor to Browning for shotguns etc. The Browning and Winchester Mdl.1886 is the best lever action 45-70 ever produced then or now. I have a Mdl. 1886 SRC that has served me well for many years.

DMH
December 9, 2012, 03:55 AM
Thanks Durangokid and I stand corrected, the 1886 was available as a SRC and some SRC's even had 22" barrels. So lots of options out there.

DMH

CraigC
December 9, 2012, 12:04 PM
All the Brownings and late model Winchesters came from the same factory, Miroku of Japan. All are superbly built rifles. All Brownings had a traditional half cock action and no external safety. All late model Winchester have the tang safety and rebounding hammer.

The Brownings were produced as a saddle ring carbine. The difference being the carbine specific buttplate, the forend band and barrel band. Along with the saddle ring. As stated I believe the barrel length was 22". A rifle will have a 26" octagon barrel, forend cap, dovetailed magazine hanger and a crescent buttplate. This are the quintessential differences between leveraction rifles and carbines. Barrel length is irrelevant in distinguishing between the two.

The late model Winchesters have been made in many more configurations. The Extra Light is a rifle configuration with a shotgun style buttplate and short magazine. I believe they have also made 20-22" "short rifles" with octagon barrels and rifle features. For a general purpose using rifle, I would choose the Extra Light.

guitarguy314
December 9, 2012, 12:56 PM
Thanks for the clarification!

Ideally, I want a browning 1886. As I said before, safety's just seem silly on a lever gun.

CraigC: Are you saying that the brownings were produced only as a saddle ring carbine, or was there also an actual rifle model?

Limey46
December 9, 2012, 01:17 PM
Yes, Browning marketed a Miroku-made 26" octagon-barreled model with a crescent buttplate, etc., as well as a 22" saddle-ring carbine. The 26" Brownings are the hardest to find of all the Miroku 1886 reproduction guns, the Winchester Extra Lights the easiest.

I second the info CraigC posted, by the way. That's all correct according to what I know.

DMH
December 9, 2012, 01:23 PM
CraigC, Just a dumb question, but I have a 26" barrel rifle and it does have a saddle ring. It has an end cap on the forearm, and no barrel band. I've always thought of it as a rifle, but would it be called a carbine due to it's butt plate and saddle ring?

David

CraigC
December 9, 2012, 05:06 PM
Are you saying that the brownings were produced only as a saddle ring carbine, or was there also an actual rifle model?
No, they were produced at least as a 22" SRC and a 26" octagon rifle configuration. Originally, a saddle ring could be ordered on anything and carbines were not the only configurations to carry them. They are just typically seen on carbines. So the saddle ring does not really differentiate between a rifle and a carbine. It's everything else.

It has an end cap on the forearm, and no barrel band. I've always thought of it as a rifle, but would it be called a carbine due to it's butt plate and saddle ring?
If it has a forend cap and dovetailed magazine hanger, it should also have a steel crescent butt plate. As opposed to a carbine style buttplate.

guitarguy314
December 14, 2012, 12:29 AM
Thanks again for the clarification. I'm sure I'll have more questions when I get closer to being able to buy the darn thing. haha

Sav .250
December 14, 2012, 11:03 AM
There are others, but the Marlin is the gold standard. They are the toughest lever action you'll find South of 4 figures.
Listen to him!

SwampWolf
December 16, 2012, 09:48 PM
I'd look for a Model 1886 "Extra Light". I've got a Jap-made (Miroku) Winchester that I like a lot. I installed a Williams "FoolProof" receiver sight on it and have been well-pleased with its perfomance, both in terms of its accuracy and reliability. The rifle is nicely finished and the workmanship is impeccable. Yes, it has the oft-criticized tang safety but that's not a big deal for me.

billykkutter
May 26, 2013, 02:18 PM
There is a Henry 45/70.
Here are my first 3 shots using it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGRosoB4xsI&feature=player_detailpage

Arizona_Mike
May 26, 2013, 02:31 PM
The Marlin without a question. I have the Brockman Super Guide Gun.

Lloyd Smale
May 26, 2013, 07:38 PM
The 1886 is the strongest, smoothest and most refined levergun available. They are also commonly found under four figures for used guns. Look for Brownings and late model Winchesters. I passed on a really nice used Browning last year for $750. Marlins are good guns as well.



couldnt have said it better

dagger dog
May 27, 2013, 12:09 AM
Killed the heck outta that milk jug, think the 45-70 is enough gun Billy ? Neat video and NICE rifle !

How's the shoulder? They always seem to thump harder with targets, once meat is on the other end of the barrel you don't seem to feel the recoil as much.

Rossi is making their copy of the Marlin 336 in 45-70 they call it the Rio Grande, I might try one of those since I already load 45-70.

Welcome to the high road !

Offfhand
May 27, 2013, 01:48 PM
Check out the Turnbull .45/70, you'll be glad you did. Every one I've seen is very well finished and worked smoothly. I'd buy one myself if I didn't have a nice original Winchester .45/70 lever rifle.

351 WINCHESTER
May 27, 2013, 04:45 PM
My lgs had a Henry. I was suprised at the fit and finish and the smooth action. I have no idea as to how strong it is, but I was more impressed with it than the current "Marlins".

pricedo
November 24, 2013, 11:37 PM
http://i570.photobucket.com/albums/ss143/pricedo/DSCF00611072x804536x402_zps68088ddb.jpg (http://s570.photobucket.com/user/pricedo/media/DSCF00611072x804536x402_zps68088ddb.jpg.html)

Bought a Miroku Winchester 1886 Extra Light Grade 1 brand new last week with 4 boxes of Buffalo Bore ammo.
Anecdotal reports say the Miroku action is stiff because of the lawyer parts (rebounding hammer, multi-part trigger linkage).
I cycled my rifles action several hundred times in front of the TV and it is as smooth as silk after the break in.
The 1886 EL was a limited run and is now classed by Winchester as a historic/discontinued model.
I love the light weight (a tad over 7 pounds) and I WON'T be scoping this rifle (scout scope) as I find the factory sights are very fine & precise and suitable to the purpose of short to medium range thick brush hunting of deer , elk & moose..
Installed an Uncle Mikes 2/3 band on the mag tube and a swivel eye in the buttstock and am using a Quaker "Claw" soft neoprene sling which won't slip off my shoulder like leather slings sometimes do.
Can't wait to shoot it.
Must be someone out there who has shot and game field tested this gun.:D
What is your opinion of it?

AethelstanAegen
November 25, 2013, 02:39 AM
I also recently bought a Miroku made Winchester 1886 Extra Light. I couldn't be happier with it. I bought mine used for $800 and I'll eat my hat if the previous owner even shot the thing. It also had Lyman front and rear (peep) sights so I'm really happy with it. By far my favorite rifle I have ever owned.

Palehorseman
November 25, 2013, 05:28 AM
Awesome game getter is that 45-70. Mine is a Ruger #1 though.
Nothing wrong with a 45-70 single shot lever action, one makes that single shot count.

My 1878 JM Marlin Ballard #5 Pacific in 45-70.

http://hstrial-rchambers.homestead.com/P10105362f.jpg

Palehorseman
November 25, 2013, 05:30 AM
http://i570.photobucket.com/albums/ss143/pricedo/DSCF00611072x804536x402_zps68088ddb.jpg (http://s570.photobucket.com/user/pricedo/media/DSCF00611072x804536x402_zps68088ddb.jpg.html)

Bought a Miroku Winchester 1886 Extra Light Grade 1 brand new last week with 4 boxes of Buffalo Bore ammo.
Anecdotal reports say the Miroku action is stiff because of the lawyer parts (rebounding hammer, multi-part trigger linkage).
I cycled my rifles action several hundred times in front of the TV and it is as smooth as silk after the break in.
The 1886 EL was a limited run and is now classed by Winchester as a historic/discontinued model.
I love the light weight (a tad over 7 pounds) and I WON'T be scoping this rifle (scout scope) as I find the factory sights are very fine & precise and suitable to the purpose of short to medium range thick brush hunting of deer , elk & moose..
Installed an Uncle Mikes 2/3 band on the mag tube and a swivel eye in the buttstock and am using a Quaker "Claw" soft neoprene sling which won't slip off my shoulder like leather slings sometimes do.
Can't wait to shoot it.
Must be someone out there who has shot and game field tested this gun.:D
What is your opinion of it?
Nice, very nice.

StrawHat
November 25, 2013, 07:03 AM
Seems this old thread has new legs.

The Marlin rifle is the same weight as the Winchester Extra Lightweight 1886. It also has a longer lineage than the Winchester. I do not own either as I prefer the single shot rifles, nice Ballard by the way.

guitarguy314, did you ever get 45-70?

gunner69
November 25, 2013, 11:27 AM
Well I am still happy with my Jap Winchester 1886 to date. I installed a small red dot using a Taylor mount and it is deadly and fast. No regrets here......

SwampWolf
November 25, 2013, 01:10 PM
As I reported about a year ago in this thread, I mounted a Williams FoolProof receiver sight on my 1886 Extra Light Weight Winchester repo and I'm very pleased with the set-up. I have Williams receiver sights mounted on several of my "brush/deep woods" rifles, where quick handling and fast sight acquisition are priorites. You will find that the proper use of peep sights are way faster than the factory irons that came with your rifle.

az_imuth
November 25, 2013, 06:59 PM
I recently picked up one of the Browning 1886 Saddle Ring Carbines that appeared to be unfired and I love it. The fit and finish is exceptional, from the fitting of the walnut, to the deep, lustrous bluing. Every part and piece seems to fit together perfectly.

http://i498.photobucket.com/albums/rr348/az_imuth/Levers/1886action_zpsf1aa0840.jpg

flashhole
November 26, 2013, 06:59 PM
Guide Gun for me. Mine is also factory ported. Slick action, accurate and handy in the woods.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v69/GuideGun/GuideGun.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/GuideGun/media/GuideGun.jpg.html)

DMH
November 26, 2013, 10:41 PM
az_imuth, Very nice looking Browning 1886!

DMH

dprice3844444
November 26, 2013, 10:47 PM
davidsons usually comes out with an 1895 ss marling guide gun 16.5 inch bbl around this time

MistWolf
November 26, 2013, 11:02 PM
This is the one for me- Marlin LTD III
http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n289/SgtSongDog/MarlinLTDIII.jpg

Onmilo
November 26, 2013, 11:43 PM
I have owned a Miroku 1886 Extra Lightweight rifle since they first came on the market.
The gun weighs the same as an 1873 Trapdoor Carbine, carries five shots and can handle loads way stouter than the '73 ever could, nuff said.
http://www.fototime.com/88981845C170626/standard.jpg

StrawHat
November 27, 2013, 08:22 AM
omnilo, Nice looking rifle

Not sure why you would need stouter loads, the old black powder loads are still good loads.

AethelstanAegen
November 27, 2013, 02:08 PM
Not sure why you would need stouter loads, the old black powder loads are still good loads.

I'm guessing his point is that you can feed an 1886 anything you want because the action is rock solid. I generally only shoot blackpowder through mine (because it's wicked fun) but it's nice to know that I can fire any 45/70 loads on the market today. Even the Marlin 1895 eventually hits a limit I believe, but the 1886 can eat anything.

Driftwood Johnson
November 27, 2013, 04:53 PM
CraigC, Just a dumb question, but I have a 26" barrel rifle and it does have a saddle ring. It has an end cap on the forearm, and no barrel band. I've always thought of it as a rifle, but would it be called a carbine due to it's butt plate and saddle ring?


Not CraidC but I can answer that question. If it has an end cap on the fore end and no barrel band, it is a rifle.


During the 19th Century, Winchester offered their rifles in three different configurations; rifle, carbine, and musket.


Typically, a rifle had a cap on the end of the fore end, and the magazine was hung from a single hanger dovetailed into the bottom of the barrel. Rifles usually had a cast crescent shaped butt plate. Winchester would supply a rifle in almost any barrel length desired, barrel length was not what defined the difference between a carbine and a rifle. Barrels could be round, octagonal, or half round half octagon. I have seen Winchester rifles with 16" barrels built in the rifle configuration.



This is a photo of a typical Model 1892 rifle. Notice the configuration of the butt plate, the cap on the end of the for end, and the method of supporting the magazine.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/Winchester/Winchester1892Rifle.jpg



Carbines did not use a dovetailed magazine hanger, the magazine was supported by barrel bands, typically two. The front sight may have been dovetailed directly into the barrel, or it may have been integral with the front barrel band. There was no end cap on the fore end. The butt plate was a strap of heavy sheet metal bent to shape, generally less severly scooped than a crescent shaped butt plate. There was a slight flat at the comb of the stock. Carbine barrels had a relatively severe taper from the receiver to the muzzle. A saddle ring might or might not be present on a carbine. It was not a defining feature of a carbine, only a defining feature of a Saddle Ring Caribine.


This is a typical Model 1892 Saddle Ring Carbine. (The ring is on the other side.) Notice the barrel bands, and the lack of an end cap on the fore end.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/Winchester/92carbine.jpg

The Musket configuration was like an overgrown carbine. Do not be confused by the 18th Century use of the work musket, these guns were rifled. The butt stock was similar to a carbine butt stock. The barrel was long, and the fore end extended almost all the way to the muzzle. Muskets usually had 3 barrel bands. Many Muskets were sold to foreign governments, so many had bayonet mounts on them. You don't see muskets very often.

Even though the rifles I have shown are '92s, Winchester used these configurations for all their lever guns in the 1800s.

Regarding the OP's questions, if I were going to buy a 45-70 lever gun I would buy the heaviest one I could find. I fired one of those Marlin Guide Guns a few years ago and it beat the dickens out of me with recoil. I could not keep shooting it. I would also avoid a crescent shaped butt plate and go for one with a nice rubber butt pad.

Onmilo
November 27, 2013, 10:46 PM
I love shooting blackpowder .45/70s, have a Pedersoli 1874 Sharps Infantry rifle that I shoot pretty much with only B.P loads.

The Miroku 1886 is a different beast.
The barrel is rifled specifically to shoot best with jacketed bullet loads at fairly high velocity for the caliber. hth

DMH
November 27, 2013, 11:06 PM
Thanks Driftwood.

DMH

pricedo
December 10, 2013, 10:36 PM
The 1886 EL isn't the only 45-70 I own.
I own 2 x Guide Guns (G + GS), Pedersoli 86/71, NEF Handi-Rifle, Baikal MP221 SxS.
Seems that old NEF is always bouncing around behind the seat of my PU and has been "Johnny-on-the-spot" for 5 moose and at least 2 deer.
The gun in your hand when you spot the animal is the one that counts.
The old Handi-Rifle has put more meat in the freezer than any of it's fancy Nancy 45-70
peers.

AethelstanAegen
December 10, 2013, 10:57 PM
The 1886 EL isn't the only 45-70 I own.
I own 2 x Guide Guns (G + GS), Pedersoli 86/71, NEF Handi-Rifle, Baikal MP221 SxS.

How do you like the 1886 EL as compared to the Pedersoli 86/71? I had looked into the Pedersoli as well but I ended up finding a really good deal on an 1886 EL.

bikemutt
December 10, 2013, 11:16 PM
If a crazy force entered orbit and demanded I could keep only one of my guns, the marlin 1895 guide gun would be the one, assuming 45-70 ammo is available on Mars of course, for a reasonable price :D

pricedo
December 10, 2013, 11:23 PM
The Pedersoli 86/71 is a bit slicker because it was built according to the Gospel of John Moses Browning and doesn't any of the lawyer parts of the Miroku built 1886 EL.
Still, I've dry cycled the 1886 EL and it is pretty darn slick.
The 86/71 has a 24" barrel & is heavier.
Throw a long days carry on a warn Indian summer day in November into the mix and it'll be the 1886 EL that's going hunting.
Steve Young of Steve's Gunz apparently will convert a Miroku built Winchester 1886 EL to the old legacy JMB configuration but it is expensive and I'm happy with mine the way it is.
Dry cycle the action a whole bunch of times and it'll smooth out.

AK103K
December 10, 2013, 11:23 PM
(Beware the similar-looking No. 3; I read/hear its stock can result in brutal recoil.)
I can attest to that. Picture shooting a 10/22 in 45-70. I hated this thing growing up. Now with 300 grain LFP's over 14 grains of Trail Boss, and its a pussy cat.

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2cc08b3127ccef1aef712439000000030O00CYuWbdo5bsQe3nwk/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107947390120121229181410417.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

I also have a Marlin Guide Gun, which I like a lot. My other lever guns are all Winchesters, and I find the actions are smoother to work, but the Marlin isnt bad. I think its that little hump at the back of the bolt thats the problem. It hangs up on the hammer as the bolt goes forward.

My only other issue was the recoil pad, which I replaced with a butt plate. Fits and shoulders much better now. :)

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