Double Star AR 15 (Don't Buy!)


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armysniper
November 13, 2012, 01:00 AM
I purchased a used Double Star Ar-15 from a local shop. It looked brand new. The price was right with the features I wanted on a basic AR. The biggest thing I wanted was an AR 15 that was factory built and not a thrown together kit because I wanted something that would be covered under warranty.

Double Star boasts a lifetime warranty.

I took the rifle to the range, and after about 60 rounds down range the rifle jammed. I field stripped the rifle and discovered the buffer spring retention pin had popped out and broken the edge of the buffer tube that is supposed to hold it down. It is noteworthy to state that the rifle had a single point sling plate attached to it when I bought it.

It turns out that the plate is not a factory part but was either installed by the rifle's previous owner or the gun shop I bought it from. This information was revealed when I contacted, "Doug," at Doublestar about the issue. He stated that my rifle shipped with the standard back plate. I showed him a picture of the damage and he stated that whoever installed the single point sling plate on the rifle did not screw the buffer tube far enough into the rifle.

He further stated that because this part was put onto the rifle the, "ENTIRE." warranty for the whole rifle was voided. Furthermore, any accessory that is added or part replaced on the original set up of the rifle voids the warranty. This includes changing out the hand guards adding a riser, scope, or anything else other than what was shipped from the factory. I was shocked because I believe some rifles come with only the rail to add scopes. So if anything else go wrong with this rifle that happens to not be an easy fix because of poor materials, I am screwed.

Here is my problem, the buffer tube was of such poor quality that the spring tension broke a piece of the tube off. I now know it was an easy fix, once you have the proper tools. But until I researched AR building, I had no clue how to fix it. But the point is, how cheap is the metal they use for it to chip and fail like that?

Finally, their lifetime warranty is highly conditional. Any accessory or configuration must be added at their factory prior to receiving your rifle. What stinks, is I sold my M&P 15 sport to put money towards this rifle just so I could have a dust cover and forward assist, because the quality of this rifle is very poor compared to the sport.

I thought about trading this rifle off to someone else, but I would not dare put this rifle into anyone else's hands just for them to have an issue and it fail them. It will be retired to my safe, and taken to the range on occasion. It most certainly will not be used as my MBR home defense rifle or otherwise.

I am just sharing my experience because I feel strongly that their product is inferior to other rifles I have used or owned. Dont let their low price fool you into buying it.

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Sport45
November 13, 2012, 03:42 AM
I sold my M&P 15 sport to put money towards this rifle just so I could have a dust cover and forward assist

Sorry, but I have to ask why? I can't imagine a time when a forward assist would do anything but get a jammed cartridge jammed worse and although my AR's have dust covers I can't remember the last time I closed one.

Anyway, thanks for the heads up on the customer service issue here. Now get a new buffer tube put in that thing and see if you can get it working again.

HorseSoldier
November 13, 2012, 03:51 AM
I was taught to always use the forward assist after confirming a round in the chamber during a deliberate load and to always close the dust cover after engaging while scanning for additional threats. I can't speak for armysniper, but if his screen name is resume related, he's probably been exposed to the same manual of arms that I have.

meanmrmustard
November 13, 2012, 07:30 AM
Bummer dude. You'd have likely never needed the FA or DC, maybe, but the Doublestar was not worth.getting rid of a Sport. I'd be reaming them severely.

Walkalong
November 13, 2012, 07:38 AM
That buffer tube is definitely not screwed in far enough. The only good news if they will not fix it (And I would be hot with the shop as well), is that a buffer tube and the little parts you need are relatively inexpensive and easy enough to install.

Having new things break really bites.

cfullgraf
November 13, 2012, 07:39 AM
Double Star boasts a lifetime warranty.


There is always more to a warranty than the two words "lifetime warranty".

At first blush, it does not mean "unlimited warranty".

You should check their fine print.

I can understand Double Star's position. If part of the rifle is modified, who knows what else has been tampered with.

I would take it back to the gun store and complain. They should have inspected the rifle and made sure it was safe and properly assembled.

But warranties on used stuff is highly variable.

Remember, things are used for a reason, maybe not a bad reason, but a reason all the same.

Anyway, looks like an easy fix and you may even be able to salvage the buffer tube. Take a small file and dress out the sharp areas of the broken area. Smooth the rough edges.

Upon re-installation, make sure the break is located at away from the retaining pin.

Buffer tubes are not that expensive though, so you may just get a new one.

BoilerUP
November 13, 2012, 07:56 AM
I'd start at the gun shop. Did they advertise the rifle as new or used? If used, then they should have inspected it; if new, that could go MANY different ways.

Aaron Baker
November 13, 2012, 08:18 AM
I can't speak to Doublestar's overall quality, but I'm just not sure what you want this company to do in this situation.

You bought a rifle that was new-looking, but that you knew was used. Very few lifetime warranties are transferable. I would never assume one was unless I knew otherwise, so I wouldn't expect a manufacturer to stand behind a warranty on a product I bought used.

And you're blaming them for using poor quality materials because one of those materials broke when it was improperly installed and used by someone other than the manufacturer? I don't know anything about metallurgy or "mil-spec" for a buffer tube, but should buffer tubes be designed in a way so that they don't break if they're improperly installed?

AR15s are highly modifiable guns, but I think it's unreasonable to expect them to warranty anything on a gun that has been modified... for precisely this reason. Once someone else has monkeyed with it (the previous owner, in your case), things may break that wouldn't have broken if they were properly installed from the factory or by an authorized gunsmith.

Now you're relegating a perfectly good gun to the safe because you won't trust it after replacing a $20 part. That also seems silly. If the components on a Doublestar were trustworthy enough to use as a HD gun before this incident, then they should be just as trustworthy after you properly repair what the previous owner (not the factory) screwed up.

Your ultimate advice is not to let their low price fool you into thinking you're buying a high quality gun? That seems a bit obvious, but I still don't see anything low quality about their workmanship, since it's the previous owner's workmanship that is an issue.

Just my opinion. I understand you're upset that your "new to you" rifle broke and no one wanted to fix it for free, but I don't think lashing out at the original manufacturer makes sense.

Aaron

Redlg155
November 13, 2012, 08:19 AM
I would definitely take it back to the shop if they sold it as "NEW". That should mean unfired except for factory testing and no previous owners. I suspect he sold you a "LNIB" or Like New Condition but used. I would also take it back if he stated that there was a lifetime warrant as most warranties are to the orginal owner and not transferable.

I would put more fault on the amateurish installation of the sling plate than the buffer tube. Replace the buffer tube and and sling plate with a quality part and you should be good to go. Oh...and if you do the work yourself, do yourself and buy a quality armorers tool and not one of the cheap $5 castle nut tools. Been there, done that.

taliv
November 13, 2012, 08:20 AM
there are a lot of lessons to learn from this

gotigers
November 13, 2012, 08:23 AM
It doesn't sound like DSC's fault. It sounds like you and the gun shop owner should be having a talk. Most warranties are similar.

You could call it a lesson and buy a new buffer tube and small parts, then move along.

I would still have a talk with the shop owner.

viking499
November 13, 2012, 08:25 AM
I have had a Doublestar for 8+ years. Not a Hiccup or other problem. Would easily recommend them here.

Walkalong
November 13, 2012, 10:46 AM
a rifle that was new-looking, but that you knew was used. Yea, if it was sold as used, you are at the mercy of the shop who sold it. I would not waste a lot of time with them. If they will make it good, great, if not, buy what you need and fix it.

longdayjake
November 13, 2012, 10:48 AM
I have a double star 6.5 grendel. Of the many AR's that I have owned, it is probably the most solid. But then again, I bought mine direct and not from some corner shop.

Kyle M.
November 13, 2012, 10:50 AM
I have had a Doublestar for 8+ years. Not a Hiccup or other problem. Would easily recommend them here.

I had one for for six months and 3,000 rounds of steel cased silver bear not one problem with mine. My cousin wanted one really bad so I made her a good deal on it. It would seem to me this is one of those things that sometimes happens with used guns, fix it and know what to look for next time. I give every used gun I intend to purchase a good going over with a fine tooth comb before I buy. If the dealer you got it from is at all reputable he'll try to make it right whether it be replacing the buffer tube or directing you to a gunsmith or parts supplier nearby.

Jackal
November 13, 2012, 10:57 AM
The buffer tube is fine and can be reused (going from the very minimal "ding" in the picture). If there's a burr, smooth it with a file. Just get a new retainer and screw that bugger in 1-2 more turns. Problem solved, for about $5. Agreed, its not Double Stars problem that you purchased a used rifle that was monkeyed with.

MachIVshooter
November 13, 2012, 11:05 AM
Here is my problem, the buffer tube was of such poor quality that the spring tension broke a piece of the tube off.

No. That damage occurred because the buffer detent pin was not retained, and was being battered back and forth. Whoever installed that tube did not know what he/she was doing.

A new, US-made buffer tube is $20 (PSA, DSA, UTG, the list goes on). Just measue yours to find out if it's mil spec (1.15") or commercial (1.17"). Commercial stocks are sloppy on mil spec tubes, and mil spec stocks won't go on commercial tubes.

Buffer detent pin is $1

Detent pin spring is $1

A decent stock wrench is $10 (Tapco Intrafuse)& up, but I'm sure a local shop would let you use theirs to do the swap on site. It's a 5 minute fix.

Upon re-installation, make sure the break is located at away from the retaining pin.

How exactly would he do that? Buffer tubes can only install one way.

armysniper
November 13, 2012, 12:13 PM
Thank you for the suggestions on fixing my issue. My main reasons for this post still are:

1) How come I have to come on community board to find solutions instead at least being offered some from the manufacturer. I like most people do not know all the ins and outs of building an AR 15 nor should anyone scoff like I should have known.

2) The AR market is so competitive that what skin would it have been off of their rears to help a customer.

3) Hell yeah, a lot of lessons were learned and I want to pass my mistakes onto others so that they may learn.

tarakian
November 13, 2012, 12:33 PM
It is not the manufacturer's job to teach gunsmithing to it's customers. Any advice/instruction they gave you could leave them open to a lawsuit if you aren't any better at gunsmithing than the previous owner. This is something you should have discussed with the shop you bought it from. If they didn't know how to fix it, they should direct you to someone who can. You really should have the entire gun checked out by a professional. You never know what else the previous owner may have modified badly.

fanchisimo
November 13, 2012, 12:41 PM
In this case I can see Double Star not honoring the warranty for this case since the modification was an individual. However, if it is as you say and they would not honor a mechanical malfunction if you mount something superfluous like a scope or handguard, that doesn't sound like a great warranty. I know if something like a bolt carrier broke and they wouldn't replace it cause I put a RDS on it, I would be upset.

ApacheCoTodd
November 13, 2012, 03:08 PM
I'm a fan of neither Double Star nor Doug but I don't see them being outa line on backing away from modified - and poorly at that - rifles.

I'd have taken it back, charged you for non standard work or repairs and pointed out your purchasing errors to you but I still get them/him making their decision too.

JFtheGR8
November 13, 2012, 03:09 PM
A non-firing inspection period is usually customary when purchasing a used firearm so it can be inspected by competent hands such as a gunsmith. Make sure to take advantage of such a policy in the future. If the seller won't agree to such then don't buy from them. I'd consider myself lucky that it's a cheap fix. Get the rest of the gun checked over to avoid a catastrophic failure from possibly happening but I think you'll be good.


Posted from Thehighroad.org App for Android

pseudonymity
November 13, 2012, 05:51 PM
The buffer tube is fine and can be reused (going from the very minimal "ding" in the picture). If there's a burr, smooth it with a file. Just get a new retainer and screw that bugger in 1-2 more turns. Problem solved, for about $5. Agreed, its not Double Stars problem that you purchased a used rifle that was monkeyed with.

This. The extension was not installed properly and if it was not factory work, it is hard to see why they would warranty the work of another party.

Any damage looks really minimal - just get a new retainer and spring if needed, loosen the castle nut and thread the extension in another 2-3 turns. If it is slightly too long and covers the center of the pin, use a small rat tail file to file a small notch in the extension tube. It is disappointing that you did not get a full factory build, but I think your issue is really with the seller, not the factory.

Like this. (http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee55/gdean5261/AR/Lowers/IMG_4470.jpg)

Aaron Baker
November 13, 2012, 05:57 PM
Don't forget to stake the castle nut when you're done. It's easy, and it keeps the nut from backing off. (Which could potentially cause this problem again.)

Zombiphobia
November 13, 2012, 06:14 PM
Well, my plans for buying Double Star parts to build an AR have just flown out the window never to be seen or heard form again.

Thanks for sharing, OP, that's some wretched customer service and sounds like an excuse to screw customers. Makes me think their products must be crap for them to so quickly void a warranty.

BoilerUP
November 13, 2012, 07:21 PM
Well, my plans for buying Double Star parts to build an AR have just flown out the window never to be seen or heard form again.

Thanks for sharing, OP, that's some wretched customer service and sounds like an excuse to screw customers. Makes me think their products must be crap for them to so quickly void a warranty.

Did you even read the original post?

TheLostOtter
November 13, 2012, 07:36 PM
Did you even read the original post?

If he read it like I did, the customer service guy said adding a scope to the rifle voids the whole warranty. That is poor customer service and gives them an excuse to any issue you might have. Now I don't blame them for not honoring their warranty since the previous owner assembled the rifle wrong. However, if they sent the OP <$5 in parts he needs to fix the issue they might have had a customer for life.

Fremmer
November 13, 2012, 07:50 PM
The op didn't have a warranty, and what mach said sounds logical. Sorry that it didn't go well, but fix it and let us know how she shoots.

I don't think doublestar did anything wrong, and I hear their rifles can shoot. Let us know!

Elkins45
November 13, 2012, 08:18 PM
I would never expect a used gun to have a warranty of any sort unless I possessed a written document from the manufacturer stating such.

There's a reason used guns cost less than new...

dogtown tom
November 13, 2012, 08:22 PM
armysniper.....Double Star boasts a lifetime warranty......

Nope.

Read page 31: http://star15.com/pdf/AR-15_manual.pdf

12131
November 13, 2012, 08:32 PM
I purchased a used Double Star Ar-15 from a local shop. It looked brand new.
What did the shop owner tell you? Was it new from factory, or was it "LNIB" that someone else has messed with?
The price was right with the features I wanted on a basic AR. The biggest thing I wanted was an AR 15 that was factory built and not a thrown together kit because I wanted something that would be covered under warranty.

Double Star boasts a lifetime warranty.

I took the rifle to the range, and after about 60 rounds down range the rifle jammed. I field stripped the rifle and discovered the buffer spring retention pin had popped out and broken the edge of the buffer tube that is supposed to hold it down. It is noteworthy to state that the rifle had a single point sling plate attached to it when I bought it.

It turns out that the plate is not a factory part but was either installed by the rifle's previous owner or the gun shop I bought it from. There you go. It wasn't factory new. The previous owner messed with it.
This information was revealed when I contacted, "Doug," at Doublestar about the issue. He stated that my rifle shipped with the standard back plate. I showed him a picture of the damage and he stated that whoever installed the single point sling plate on the rifle did not screw the buffer tube far enough into the rifle.And didn't put it back properly!

He further stated that because this part was put onto the rifle the, "ENTIRE." warranty for the whole rifle was voided. Furthermore, any accessory that is added or part replaced on the original set up of the rifle voids the warranty. This includes changing out the hand guards adding a riser, scope, or anything else other than what was shipped from the factory. I was shocked because I believe some rifles come with only the rail to add scopes. I agree with you about the scope business. That's just poor excuse from DS. However, in your particular case, I don't see how DS owes you anything. So if anything else go wrong with this rifle that happens to not be an easy fix because of poor materials, I am screwed.

Here is my problem, the buffer tube was of such poor quality that the spring tension broke a piece of the tube off. I now know it was an easy fix, once you have the proper tools. But until I researched AR building, I had no clue how to fix it. But the point is, how cheap is the metal they use for it to chip and fail like that?

Finally, their lifetime warranty is highly conditional. Any accessory or configuration must be added at their factory prior to receiving your rifle. What stinks, is I sold my M&P 15 sport to put money towards this rifle just so I could have a dust cover and forward assist, because the quality of this rifle is very poor compared to the sport.

I thought about trading this rifle off to someone else, but I would not dare put this rifle into anyone else's hands just for them to have an issue and it fail them. It will be retired to my safe, and taken to the range on occasion. It most certainly will not be used as my MBR home defense rifle or otherwise.

I am just sharing my experience because I feel strongly that their product is inferior to other rifles I have used or owned. Dont let their low price fool you into buying it.
Another question I have is, when you unlocked the rear take down pin and lifted up the upper from the lower, did things start flying out? Was the buffer retention pin, along with its spring, there originally? or they were never there in the first place. My guess is they were never there in the first place, because from your pic, it looks like the buffer tube edge has just barely gotten to the edge of the hole, so it couldn't have held anything down in place. The previous owner messed it up, bottom line. Can't fault DS for this.

3twelves
November 13, 2012, 08:35 PM
Its not DSC fault someone doesn't know how to put an AR buffer tube on...


Warranty doesn't cover stupidity.

I have had good luck with a DS carbine upper.

WinThePennant
November 13, 2012, 09:27 PM
I have a question. Just how far forward does the buffer tube have to be? One of my ARs is not butting up against the pin. Should it be all the way forward?

cfullgraf
November 13, 2012, 09:32 PM
I am sure there is a spec. on how far to screw on the buffer tube.

I screw it on until the tube just clears the small pin extension on the retention pin. The buffer tube covers about 1/3 of the diameter of the large part of the tube.

The retention pin should move up and town freely.

12131
November 13, 2012, 09:34 PM
I have a question. Just how far forward does the buffer tube have to be? One of my ARs is not butting up against the pin. Should it be all the way forward?
All it has to be is just passed over the edge of the hole a little, so that it holds the pin down. It does not need to hit the center of the pin itself.

Warp
November 13, 2012, 09:35 PM
I have a question. Just how far forward does the buffer tube have to be? One of my ARs is not butting up against the pin. Should it be all the way forward?

It needs to cover the edge of the buffer retainer, sufficient to hold it in position, but not so far that it covers the pin/nipple that protrudes up.

It doesn't have to physically touch the pin, as far as I know. I don't think mine does, either.

mshootnit
November 13, 2012, 10:04 PM
The thread title says double star ar15 don't buy. It should be :used and improperly modified double star, know what to look for before you buy.

WinThePennant
November 13, 2012, 10:10 PM
How's my buffer detent look? Do I need to perform minor surgery, or is it deep enough?

http://i1061.photobucket.com/albums/t474/WinThePennant/1113122146b.jpg

http://i1061.photobucket.com/albums/t474/WinThePennant/1113122146a.jpg

Warp
November 13, 2012, 10:16 PM
That's fine.

cfullgraf
November 13, 2012, 10:22 PM
Yes, a pix is worth a 1000 words. Looks OK.

joustin
November 13, 2012, 10:32 PM
Sounds like you should have field stripped the rifle before purchasing it. Heck at my part time job I field strip them even if they are new before selling then. Caveat emptor et al etc

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

fanchisimo
November 14, 2012, 12:41 AM
The fact that they view a scope or a handguard as a warranty voider is enough to make me stay away from them, if it's as Doug says.

MachIVshooter
November 14, 2012, 02:05 AM
Don't forget to stake the castle nut when you're done. It's easy, and it keeps the nut from backing off. (Which could potentially cause this problem again.)

Only if you plan on replacing the tube if you ever need to remove it for any reason.

There's no need to stake it, so long as it's sufficiently tight. The tube itself can't possibly back out without you noticing anyway, since the stock would be rotating. If shot enough with a loose nut, it could batter the threads on the lower or the tube. But it's pretty tough to not notice the extension nut coming loose, since everything gets real wobbly.

I just crank the nut down hard with the wrench by hand, then give a couple whacks on the end of the wrench with a 12 ounce dead blow. Never had one I tightened come loose yet.

Davek1977
November 14, 2012, 03:35 AM
This isn't DoubleStar's fault, and not their responsibility to fix it. If I buy a car and someone swapped engines before I purchased it used, I shouldn't expect the original manufacturer to fix it under warranty when it breaks. Your beef shouldn't be with DSC, but rather the shop where you bought the USED gun that was MODIFIED by its previous owner into a non-stock configuration.

FWIW, I, along with many others, own DSC rifles, and have had absolutely no issue with them whatsoever. Granted, I don't have a round count anywhere near some people's but I've yet to have a single failure of any kind in right around 1200 rounds, using a variety of ammunition, and I wouldn't hesitate to buy again or to recommend them to a friend.

nastynatesfish
November 14, 2012, 06:31 AM
Honestly what I've read of this goes to say that you should have asked more about the rifle. When I bought my first on I took it to an ex sheriff that ownes a gun shop and asked him to break it all down for me and show me maint issues. The buffer tube not being screwed in all the way would be hard to find understand but...me not knowing crap about the platform I wanted to find out before I shot it. And mine was new in box but I bought it from a pawn shop. Anyhow lesson to me is that just cause some yahoo sells a rifle as new doesn't mean you should think of it that way. I ALWAYS go through every weapon I buy before I take it out.

sansone
November 14, 2012, 08:11 AM
OP-
just fix it and enjoy. I find the only real difference in quality (that matters) is the barrel.
If it shoots tight groups I would be thrilled with it. The repair is cheap & easy, just forget the warranty, I would rather repair my rifle than ship it away

WinThePennant
November 14, 2012, 08:52 AM
Like others have said, this is an easy fix.

Fix it. Shoot it. Enjoy it.

Sport45
November 14, 2012, 09:30 AM
Your beef shouldn't be with DSC, but rather the shop where you bought the USED gun that was MODIFIED by its previous owner into a non-stock configuration.


He never claimed the shop represented it as new.

holdencm9
November 14, 2012, 09:36 AM
Furthermore, any accessory that is added or part replaced on the original set up of the rifle voids the warranty. This includes changing out the hand guards adding a riser, scope, or anything else other than what was shipped from the factory.

If that is true, then that is BS.

To all you saying Doublestar is not to blame, etc. In this instance I agree, because the exact modification is what led to the failure.

But what if it was something totally unrelated? Based on what the OP said, they would have told him the same thing. What if he told them a lug broke off the bolt? Or extractor was super weak. Something totally unrelated to the modification? I feel like saying the warranty is voided by adding/modifying an AR makes sense because people like to tinker and some do stupid things, but switching handguards or adding an optic will not lead to any issues that deserve to void the warranty entirely. That's like changing hub caps on a car.

RatDrall
November 14, 2012, 09:38 AM
This thread is a disaster, between people not reading the post, people over reacting to what went on here, and people chomping at the bit to unleash their agenda :mad:

OP bought a used rifle, original company wouldn't pay for him to fix someone else's mistake. Makes sense to me, sounds like the shop it was bought from is responsible.

Like another said, this fix requires like $30 worth of parts and basic ability to work a spanner wrench. Hopefully your bolt carrier wasn't damaged by the wobbly buffer tube.

This is why when people say "you don't need loctite, and you don't need to stake your castle nut" those who know better just shrug and give up on them.

Well, my plans for buying Double Star parts to build an AR have just flown out the window never to be seen or heard form again.


Wow, really? Whatever you're looking at building, I guarentee you someone on the interwebz has had a bad experience with the company.

I'm not a Doublestar fan, in fact I would NEVER even buy parts from a bottom of the barrel manufacturer, but it has nothing to do with this thread, or others like it.

I had a poor experience with BCM once, but it wasn't bad enough to hurt their overall reputation even with me.

MachIVshooter
November 14, 2012, 09:58 AM
This is why when people say "you don't need loctite, and you don't need to stake your castle nut" those who know better just shrug and give up on them.

Again, if you stake the nut and then decide you want a new end plate, you're gonna need a new tube as well. The threads on the tube will be damaged by backing off a staked nut; It's aluminum.

If you wanna use anaerobic thread compounds, go right ahead. These won't cause the threads to be damaged, just will require the wrench be used for most of the backing off, rather than just breaking the nut loose.

Threaded fasteners, when properly torqued, generally do not need to be peened or thread locked. Do you loctite your wheel lug nuts?

viking499
November 14, 2012, 10:02 AM
I'm not a Doublestar fan, in fact I would NEVER even buy parts from a bottom of the barrel manufacturer, but it has nothing to do with this thread, or others like it.

Did not think they were top of the barrel, but don't understand how they could be at the bottom.

moxie
November 14, 2012, 10:09 AM
The first rule, especially in buying a used gun, is caveat emptor.

And, I would not expect a gun shop to completely tear down a used rifle and function check it and guarantee absolutely nothing wrong with it. Most are sold "as is." If they did tear it down, the usual check on the buffer would be to push in with a finger and let it go. If it springs back and is held by the pin it's good. Not sure the problem didn't happen after you fired a few rounds.

You're lucky in that it's a simple and cheap fix. Even if you've lost confidence in it as a defense piece, it will still be a perfectly serviceable range gun.

As others have noted, you don't need a BFA, or a dust cover. Can't imagine giving up a perfectly good S&W just to get these unnecessary appendages.

Finally, although Doublestar does give a lifetime warranty, it's clear in the owner's manual (read it on pg.31) that this applies to the original owner who must register it. And, the warranty does not read the way you reported. Can't imagine someone saying that putting a scope on a rifle would void the warrranty. At any rate, YOU are not entitled to the warranty. You are limited to politely asking for assistance. Again, caveat emptor.

Davek1977
November 14, 2012, 10:44 AM
He never claimed the shop represented it as new. and I never implied that they did represent it as new. However, the company has no obligation to him whatsoever as a 2nd hand owner, meaning if he had a bone to pick with anyone, it'd be the shop where he purchased the rifle....THEY provided him with the defective product, not DSC. Being mad at Doublestar for not fixing someone else's mistake doesn't make any sense, and shows a gross misunderstanding of the warranty. Too, I have NO reason to believe that swapped handguards or optics void the warranty. NOTHING in the manual that came with my NEW DSC rifle makes such a claim.

RatDrall
November 14, 2012, 03:20 PM
Again, if you stake the nut and then decide you want a new end plate, you're gonna need a new tube as well. The threads on the tube will be damaged by backing off a staked nut; It's aluminum.

I've removed two staked castle nuts, one was loctited on, with no damage to the other parts. It was slightly more difficult to break the piece of aluminum from the staking off, but it shears right off using the spanner wrench and the rest is cake.

Did not think they were top of the barrel, but don't understand how they could be at the bottom.

The barrel has a big bottom :uhoh:

Warp
November 14, 2012, 03:26 PM
I've removed two staked castle nuts, one was loctited on, with no damage to the other parts. It was slightly more difficult to break the piece of aluminum from the staking off, but it shears right off using the spanner wrench and the rest is cake.


I just put a QD endplate on my rifle last week. It was indeed more work to break the staking loose, but nothing was damaged. I used a little blue thread locker upon re-installation.

Dreamliner787
November 14, 2012, 03:40 PM
I have not had any issues with DS and with buying used ARs it's very much buyer beware as there are so many kitchen gunsmiths out there who think they know what they're doing but don't.

justice06rr
November 15, 2012, 02:21 AM
That's actually a minor fix. OP you need to read up, research, or even just watch youtube vids on how to put an AR together. If this is your second AR, you should know how to function check its basic components.

Like others said, that buffer tube is still reusable. Get a new spring and buffer tube retaining pin.

As far as DoubleStar's warranty, well thats another issue.

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