Miniatures


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rcmodel
November 13, 2012, 04:25 PM
While not weapons as such, I wouldn’t want to get stuck or cut with one.

U.S. M-1902 Army Officers Sword
7 7/16” blade – 9 5/8” OAL = Approx 25% Scale.
The cord hilt knot & hanger chain are brass.
Handle is black enameled, the guard & scabbard are nickel plated, and the blade is chromed.

I have read differing accounts of what these were made for.
One version is they were souvenirs. (of what?)
Another is that they were toys. (Not Hardly!)
And other is they were made as sword Salesman’s Samples to hand out to prospective customers at Military Academy’s?

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/M1902SwordMinature1.jpg

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/M1902SwordMinature2.jpg

I tend to think the later might be closer to the truth, as they are relatively scarce on the market, and too finely made to have been sold in quanity as cheap souvenirs.
This one is almost jewelry like quality.

It would take a highly skilled cutlery company to make a working sword blade this small, long, and thin.
Someone like an experienced sword manufacture.

PS: Come to think of it, they would have made a "Killer" hat or hair pin for a newly commissioned officers young bride to wear to the graduation ball.
So maybe they were jewelry??


U.S. M-1892 Krag Bayonet
5 5/8” blade – 7 7/8” OAL = Approx 50% Scale.
This one is newer, and cheaper made.
Probably a letter opener.
But the locking button works.

But why did they pick a little known & obscure U.S. bayonet only in service during the Spanish American war to model it after I wonder??

Shown laying on real U.S. 1897 Krag Bayonet
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/KragBayonetMinature2.jpg


Japanese Tanto
3 5/8” blade – 7 3/8” OAL
These were sold in 5 & 10 stores for .25 when I was a child in the 50’s.
This one is blade marked G.C.C.Q. Japan.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/TantoMinature.jpg

Probably intended as a letter opener, but it is quite sharp and would be dangerous in the wrong hands.


My smallest handmade knife
I got bored sometimes, O.K.!

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/BallardMinatures.jpg

” blade - 1 5/8” OAL
Ivory Micarta handle w/brass guard.

The other unfinished blade is ”, not including the tang.

The other junk surrounding them are brass running deer belt buckle, a brass antelope pommel insert, and a brass deer head paper weight I made.

rc

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hso
November 13, 2012, 07:21 PM
The salesman's sample interpretation makes the most sense. Take a look at this one. http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/antique-miniature-ww1-salesman-sample-251219263

I have a fondness for miniature knives and swords and have few in my collection as well, but nothing like the saber.

RTR_RTR
November 13, 2012, 08:17 PM
Having a hard time judging the size of the saber - can you get a finger in the hilt?

Owen Sparks
November 13, 2012, 08:40 PM
I have seen aintique miniature chairs and tables that were used by salesmen, as I understant it, this used to be a common practice.

rcmodel
November 13, 2012, 08:49 PM
RTR_RTR said:
can you get a finger in the hilt?
Yes, easily.
Even a bigger finger then mine.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/Knives/M1902SwordMinature3.jpg


HSO said:
Take a look at this one.
Thats it exactly.
Only mine is in better condition as the nickel plating & hanger chain is still intact.
But I think they are guessing too.

Wish I could find it in an old 1900's catalog or something, but so far no luck.

rc

RTR_RTR
November 13, 2012, 09:05 PM
Neat! Thanks

kBob
November 13, 2012, 09:21 PM
I have a sword much like that though the blade is not guttered and it has the acid etched designs that are on the current saber.

MS Meyer ( are they still around?) made them as letter openers and awards.

Mine has a name on oneside and a unit name on the other engraved on the sheath.

I beleive they also sold a small version of the bayonet for the M-1 that looked a lot like that krag bayonet.

Speaking of Meyer I was looking in an old jewlry box of mine today and stuck my finger on one of their old spring loaded closed collar stave sets. Now there is something that has drawn some blood!

-kBob

rcmodel
November 13, 2012, 09:29 PM
MS Meyer ( are they still around?) made them as letter openers and awards.Well theres a Clue I'll have to look into!

Thanks kBob!

rc

Deltaboy
November 13, 2012, 10:19 PM
The Saber would hurt if you got stuck in the liver or kidneys with it.

rcmodel
November 13, 2012, 10:41 PM
It would hurt you if you got stuck anywhere with it!

It's got nearly a 7 1/2" blade on it!

rc

hso
November 13, 2012, 10:55 PM
Y'know, we could contact Ames (http://www.amessword.com) and find out if they used miniature swords as salesman's sample?

rcmodel
November 13, 2012, 11:20 PM
The company remained family owned until the 1950s. Several ownership changes and product line acquisitions brought continued growth to the company. http://www.ames.com/

I'm already thinking the 19 year old girl that answers the emails wouldn't know what the old Ames company did 103 years ago. :eek:

But I also guess it wouldn't hurt to ask anyway.

Maybe I'll do that.

rc

kBob
December 11, 2012, 09:02 PM
I found my Meyer letter openner and here it is on a thing from my "I love me" wall, shelf actually.

This one was given me by a High School Army JROTC affiliate organization. The other side of the sheath has my name engraved on it. I hung on to it just in case some mad scientist shrinks me down to only 12 inches in heigth.

-kBob

bannockburn
December 13, 2012, 07:25 AM
rcmodel

Sometime back in the mid '70's I picked up a miniature U.S.M.C. Officers Mameluke sword. I don't remember who I bought it from (most likely mail order back then), but it is fairly well made and decent enough that I wouldn't consider it to be a toy. Probably more along the lines of being a rather unique and interesting letter opener.

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