"Buy Once, Cry Once" I don't get it.


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Berg
November 15, 2012, 11:18 AM
Buy once cry once. I've seen people post this as if we are supposed to know what it means. It seems to be used as a warning not to buy cheap crap but I don't get it, what does it actually mean? Why would I want to cry at all?

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M-Cameron
November 15, 2012, 11:25 AM
it means its better to spend more money(cry once at the price) and buy something of quality that will function well and not break or jam.

rather than to buy something cheap (and not cry at the price...), but only to have it break and jam all the time (....but to cry at all the times it doesnt work)

Sam1911
November 15, 2012, 11:27 AM
The idea is that you're sad to give up the money (hence "cry"), but giving up a bit more money to get a product that will last is better than having to shed those tears because you have to buy replacements for the cheap crap you bought the first (second, third, etc.) time.

So, buy good (expensive) stuff the first time and only suffer the pain of cash leaving your wallet one time.

Like all other platitudes, maxims, or truisms, there's a bit of truth to it, but it's not a universal solution for everyone. A better one would be, "be a wise consumer."

Dreamliner787
November 15, 2012, 11:39 AM
Pay for what you get, get what you paid for.

Queen_of_Thunder
November 15, 2012, 12:13 PM
Example: A few years ago I bought a made in 1968 with box 2 1/2 inch Colt Diamondback in 38 special for $800. I was offered $1500 on Tuesday and said no. I did express an interest in a trade for a S&W model 57 in nickle with box plus cash though. We shall see.

Example 2. I passed on a mauser red nine fo $1300. I do wish I had bought it just like the Colt Viper I also passed on. Today both of these guns are hard to find and the prices are out of reach for my budget. Should have bit the bullet and bought them when I had the chance.

Berg
November 15, 2012, 12:32 PM
it means its better to spend more money(cry once at the price) and buy something of quality that will function well and not break or jam.

rather than to buy something cheap (and not cry at the price...), but only to have it break and jam all the time (....but to cry at all the times it doesnt work)

This is the answer I was looking for, thanks it does make sense now.

mljdeckard
November 15, 2012, 12:40 PM
I frequently find this applies to holsters. :)

22-rimfire
November 15, 2012, 12:57 PM
Good point about holsters!

Everytime I buy a gun, I think about whether or not I really needed to make the purchase. Buyer's remorse. So, I "cry once", but I try to buy wisely.

Flopsweat
November 15, 2012, 01:46 PM
I frequently find this applies to holsters. :)
You got that right. I really should dig out the holsters that I never use (some that I didn't care for and a few that I admittedly tried to save money on) and have a sale. Save now! 50% less tears. ;)

RFMan
November 15, 2012, 01:50 PM
This is very frequently applied to scopes/optics :)

And sometimes to 1911s.

And occasionally to ARs.

RhinoDefense
November 15, 2012, 01:52 PM
Spend the money on quality equipment up front rather than spend more money over time to replace lesser quality equipment.

oneounceload
November 15, 2012, 01:59 PM
Read my sig line below

mcmurry
November 15, 2012, 02:24 PM
People say that the reasons AR's are so expensive is because they are hand made, like a Maserati. I say I don't want a "Maserati" gun, I just want a Ford or Chevy type of gun. Something dependable, but not out-friggin-rageous!

jmr40
November 15, 2012, 03:26 PM
AR's are not expensive. Most would be compared to a Ford or a Chevy. Even the most expensive models are selling at about the same price as a common hunting rifle today.

M-Cameron
November 15, 2012, 03:33 PM
People say that the reasons AR's are so expensive is because they are hand made, like a Maserati. I say I don't want a "Maserati" gun, I just want a Ford or Chevy type of gun. Something dependable, but not out-friggin-rageous!


there is a huge difference between 'hand made' and 'hand assembled'....

i'll eat my holster if ANY of the common ARs are actually 'hand made'

19-3Ben
November 15, 2012, 03:45 PM
I frequently find this applies to holsters.

Anybody who has every bought a cheap holster knows exactly what you mean. I agree 100% on this.

Warp
November 15, 2012, 03:51 PM
People say that the reasons AR's are so expensive is because they are hand made, like a Maserati. I say I don't want a "Maserati" gun, I just want a Ford or Chevy type of gun. Something dependable, but not out-friggin-rageous!

What?

ARs are not "so expensive"...they are not hand made...and I have never before heard a single person, anywhere, say that.

If you think ARs are "out-friggin-rageous"...I don't know what to tell you.

Have you checked out the high-end 1911 market lately?

How about an AR alternative such as the FN Scar?

Hunterdad
November 15, 2012, 03:53 PM
Buy quality scope and pay more $$. Cry because you spent so much on a quality optic.

Buy crappy scope, cry because crappy scope is crap. Replace crappy scope with another crappy scope then cry because crappy scope turned out to be crap. Etc...

Cesiumsponge
November 15, 2012, 04:00 PM
This axiom applies heavily in sport optics like red dots, rifle scopes, and spotting scopes. Several of my rigs have scopes that cost as much as, or more than the rifle.

Warp
November 15, 2012, 04:02 PM
Optics/lenses are definitely a place where it pays to spend the money for any kind of even semi-serious use.

mljdeckard
November 15, 2012, 04:05 PM
It's not across the board. You don't have to spend a lot of money to get a good gun that will do the job. I tell my students, if they don't have the wherewithal to do extensive testing, start with a used J-frame of G-19. It will do the job.

But yeah, with the scope reference above, my late father was so cheap, he would make the same mistake twice. Now, he wasn't very demanding of his gear, most of his shots were uncomplicated shots at deer at less than 200 yards. You don't need a Leupold to do that. But he bought a good varmint rifle, and I told him he was going to want more magnification. So he went and bought the cheapest Simmons 5-20 Walmart has to offer. I didn't say anything. It had a few adventures behind the seat of the truck, and we took it out to the open range one afternoon. I laid it across the hood and shot it at a target 200 yards away, and it was putting them in the dirt about 50 yards out. He thought I was just being stupid, so he tried it, and it did the same thing. We took it home, and took the scope off, and realized quickly that the tube was bent. Oh well. He said he would have to replace it, and I didn't say anything. So he replaced it with.....THE EXACT SAME SCOPE. I still have the rifle, and it works, but it's at the top of the list to replace.

No, you don't HAVE to buy the very best example of something to have it work. But if you buy a cheap one, and abuse it, and STILL expect it to work, you might be disappointed.

Warp
November 15, 2012, 04:11 PM
Agreed. And a cheap Simmons scope might be just what you need...depending on what you expect out of it. I wouldn't expect to bounce it around in the back seat of the truck and have it work. I do have a $40 Simmons scope on one of my rifles, and I am very happy with it...but it's just a simple 4x32 on my 10/22 that is only used for inexpensive plinking/practice where failure is borderline-acceptable. So far it has done everything I could have expected and everything I have asked of it.

But whenever I can afford to put a scope on my AR (currently has an Aimpoint), it'll probably be a ~$750 affair. Failure, or even sub par performance, will not be an option there.

rondog
November 15, 2012, 04:12 PM
This term also applies well to tools....especially when Harbor Freight is involved.

mljdeckard
November 15, 2012, 04:19 PM
I use Harbor Freight for tools I only plan on using once, but I don't plan on throwing them away either. :)

earlthegoat2
November 15, 2012, 04:30 PM
I suppose using common sense would do you well but common sense aint so common anymore.

Lots of folks really dont know how to research a product before they buy it.

Certaindeaf
November 15, 2012, 06:42 PM
You got it figured out yet Berg?

Rembrandt
November 15, 2012, 07:13 PM
For the most part consumers make their decisions based on either price or quality. That's pretty evident just looking at threads about "what should I buy?"

Most don't have unlimited resources to buy Wilson Combat Supergrades and Perrazzi's.....hence the compromise to get the best quality they can afford. For those who compromise, it's a still boils down to price. I'm pretty sure Donald Trump doesn't want the "best buy" based on price, he chooses the best quality.....and doesn't shed a tear. I tend to have Donald Trump tastes and occasionally pick up high end quality, unlike him I tend to cry a little.

FIVETWOSEVEN
November 15, 2012, 09:12 PM
Buy crap with a lifetime warranty and you buy a lifetime of crap!

Berg
November 15, 2012, 09:30 PM
Certaindeaf
You got it figured out yet Berg?

Yeah see post #6 on the first page.;)

But that's not stopping folks from making sure I know the answer :cool:

FROGO207
November 15, 2012, 11:03 PM
Yeah you know all about overkill and never enough of it don't you??:what::D

On that note I bought a bakers dozen High Points after the second debate to spite a much smarter person than I.:D

Ragnar Danneskjold
November 15, 2012, 11:21 PM
Keep in mind that price does not directly translate to quality. But very often, quality translates to price.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
November 17, 2012, 11:10 AM
Depends on what it is:

The Ruger P95 and Maverick 88 turn it on its head--and are just as good(or better) than anything in their category.

While for scopes and AR's --it starts with Ziess and Colt

Buy wisely

oneounceload
November 17, 2012, 04:35 PM
Qua
Ity costs you once , crap costs you every time it breaks, which on cheap stuffs frequently

1 old 0311-1
November 17, 2012, 08:21 PM
People say that the reasons AR's are so expensive is because they are hand made, like a Maserati. I say I don't want a "Maserati" gun, I just want a Ford or Chevy type of gun. Something dependable, but not out-friggin-rageous!
__________________
Prior Planning and Preparation Prevents Poor Performance.


They are called AK's. Their popularity is due to the fact that they DO work.
http://i1136.photobucket.com/albums/n489/kcq1/P1020900.jpg

oneounceload
November 17, 2012, 08:39 PM
ARs are about as handmade as a Mossberg..............get real

Take a look at what folks in NZ pay, at the "World's largest Gun Store" (their description)

http://www.guncity.co.nz/223-xidg28309.html

When you see what others pay, maybe folks here will stop whining - and that is from another gun-friendly country

76shuvlinoff
November 17, 2012, 09:25 PM
I try to buy quality firearms, knives, furniture, and tools. I'd post a list of what I think is quality but no matter what I listed someone would call me a fool.

It's an internet thing but you get the point.

BADSBSNF81
November 18, 2012, 12:25 PM
Along the lines of this thread, the best advice I ever received on firearms was from a gun store owner "Buy the best you can afford".

jcwit
November 18, 2012, 12:48 PM
And many times one receives real value from a less expensive product.

Not everyone needs a custom built $3000.00 rifle to shoot 1 hole groups at 100 or 200 yards.

Nor does everyone need a $1000 to $2000 :Leica scope or a $4000 dollar Schmidt & Bender scope.

Do we all drive Bentlys and Roll Royces?

Warp
November 18, 2012, 08:22 PM
People say that the reasons AR's are so expensive is because they are hand made,

People have no freaking clue what they are talking about.

wally
November 18, 2012, 08:23 PM
Pay for what you get, get what you paid for.

If it were only that simple!

9MMare
November 19, 2012, 02:52 AM
it means its better to spend more money(cry once at the price) and buy something of quality that will function well and not break or jam.

rather than to buy something cheap (and not cry at the price...), but only to have it break and jam all the time (....but to cry at all the times it doesnt work)

Totally. I made this mistake with my first mounted shooting SA revolvers. I was getting into the sport and had alot of expenses.

Found a "good deal" (you have to buy 2 guns) and thought I was good.

They were junk and altho most guns for mounted shooting need additional smithing for competition (altho some now come competition-ready)....I wasted alot of time at the SAS gunsmith and those guns never ran reliably. I'd get partway thru a meet and have to borrow guns. My entire first yr was that way.

It was frustrating and lost me matches and slowed down my developing some skills.

I ended up just giving up on them and buying standard reliable guns available in the sport and the guy I bought them from did the additional work on them for $25/gun (instead of the normal approx. $200/pr). And the absolute relief from not having to worry about my guns performing allowed me to focus on my own performance....and we had a ton of fun and won some $$.

Just imagine if you had that peace of mind with self-defense guns? Fortunately for me, I did that right from the start :o

hentown
November 19, 2012, 08:56 AM
First question on Otis Quick-Scoring I.Q. test: "What does 'buy once, cry once' mean?" :evil:

RFMan
November 19, 2012, 11:59 AM
First question on Otis Quick-Scoring I.Q. test: "What does 'buy once, cry once' mean?" :evil:
It probably means...you haven't done it yet :)

InkEd
November 19, 2012, 01:02 PM
As others have said, it's better to spend the extra on quality up front.

jcwit
November 19, 2012, 02:32 PM
IMHO, its better to buy what suits your needs.

One may need to take into consideration ones age, and financial situation along with others factors. Price alone is not the only deciding factor as to what one needs or its quality.

Warp
November 19, 2012, 02:33 PM
IMHO, its better to buy what suits your needs.

One may need to take into consideration ones age, and financial situation along with others factors. Price alone is not the only deciding factor as to what one needs or its quality.

Of course not, and nobody said nor implied that.

mcdonl
November 21, 2012, 07:34 AM
I have always purchased the cheapest I could find and have been doing so for decades. I use my **** hard, put it away dirty and it all keeps going year after year.

Sav .250
November 21, 2012, 08:18 AM
Buyer Beware............ Never saw/heard the cry comment.

BullfrogKen
November 21, 2012, 08:37 AM
I really like the quote Brownell's has in the front of their catalogs:


It's unwise to pay too much . . . but it's worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money . . . that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot. It can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better.

Ian Sean
November 21, 2012, 10:23 AM
The saying I use most often is probably, "Buy cheap...Buy twice".

Most often comes true on tools and optics, I try to stick to high quality and US made as much as possible myself.

If you enjoyed reading about ""Buy Once, Cry Once" I don't get it." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!