How do I do this? 1 scope multiple rounds


PDA






breakingcontact
November 17, 2012, 12:53 PM
Throwing myself on the mercy of the forum here. I'm not new to guns at all but am basically new to scopes. Will try to be very specific here. Your help is much appreciated.

Have this scope. http://www.nikonhunting.com/images/product/p-223_3x32_product.jpg

http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/riflescopes/p-223/3x32_BDC_Carbine/8496

It's designed for 200 zero with 55 grain bullets, then it has hold over marks for other ranges. OK, I get that.

What I need to know is how to use this scope. I have the Nikon Spot On app that gives me the different hold overs for different bullets. I understand that. I've read the manuals that came with it. What I'm trying to figure out follows:

It has zero reset turrets. So after zeroing for 200 yards with the 55 grain bullets, am I to then lift the turret and place the marks on 0? Then this allows me to then zero for say a 77 grain bullet. Then return to 0 mark for my original 55 grain bullet?

If you enjoyed reading about "How do I do this? 1 scope multiple rounds" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Ar180shooter
November 17, 2012, 01:14 PM
Theoretically, yes. But keep in mind, the BDC will not work properly for 77gr bullets if it is designed for 55gr bullets.

breakingcontact
November 17, 2012, 01:33 PM
I think that's what the Nikon Spot On app is for. Would make the 400 hash mark 371 yards.

That part I get as well.

So I set my turrets to zero once zeroed for 200 yards w 55 gr bullet. Then basically make a temporary zero for whatever bullet I want to use. Then can return to zero for my original 200 yard 55 grain zero?

DRYHUMOR
November 17, 2012, 02:14 PM
It might be simpler just to figure the drop of your 77gr round at 200 yds, then dial up 2 or 3 clicks of elevation. Then dial back down for your 55gr zero.

If you know the particulars of the load, you can use this calculator. Ammo makers have the drop/velocity data. The BC of the bullets they use may be harder to find in some cases.

http://gundata.org/ballistic-calculator/

HorseSoldier
November 17, 2012, 02:21 PM
For different bullet weights and loads, what you're really going to want is a scope with a mil-dot reticle, rather than a set bullet drop for a specific load/weight. However, the difference may or may not be significant for the range and application you are interested in -- you just have to look at the differences in bullet drop for range.

breakingcontact
November 17, 2012, 05:57 PM
I dont plan on shooting really long distances or for tiny groups so I'm happy with this scope. Just trying to figure out how to use it properly.

Ramone
November 17, 2012, 06:06 PM
yes, that is exactly correct.

Start a Log Book now, and when you have enough dope, you can make a simple chart of Range = X clicks up/down from 55 grain zero @ 200 yards for each loading you shoot regularly.

Chances are, you are going to find a load that the rifle likes best, and mostly shoot that.

If you enjoyed reading about "How do I do this? 1 scope multiple rounds" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!