Hog Rifle


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slickone
November 19, 2012, 11:52 AM
I am contemplating buying a rifle that can take down Hogs. I have read so many opinions. I'm asking what rifle and caliber and scope would be the right one for this. Appreciate your feedback.

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RPRNY
November 19, 2012, 12:39 PM
That rifle and scope combination with which you are most accurate and comfortable.

I understand that this is not the detailed description you may have been looking for but it is true. People very successfully earhole pigs with .22lr. I have seen a vid of Jim Shockey taking hogs with a .22 air gun. I would not be comfortable with .22 caliber rifles because I am much more comfortable with neck and lung shots which give you a larger effective target area.

What are the conditions that you will hunt hogs under. Walking up bottomland usually means pretty close shots. Baited shots are also pretty close. A 336 30-30 with Skinner sights would do you very well. If you are frequently shooting over 100 yards, a good bolt gun with well penetrating rounds in quarter bore and above "deer cartridges" will do you very nicely. Savage makes a Hog Hunter in .308 that seems to be both well designed and well received. I also think an older Remington 7600 in .270, .280, or .308 would make a great hog gun.

If you can brain shoot them with confidence, .223 seems a perfectly good choice but I am skeptical about 223 performance in neck and lung shots (flaming to commence shortly). I would say 120 gr or more at terminal velocities for your hunting conditions that provide good expansion. Unless, you have some kind of long-range hog hunting conditions, open sights or a low powered "shot gun" scope would do you fine - the Simmons Pro Hunter 1.5x5/32 for example is a great budget scope for such a rifle.

snakeman
November 19, 2012, 12:52 PM
savage hog hunter 308
marlin 336 35 rem or 30-30
308 marlin express
mossberg 30-30
marlin xl7 243 or 308
mossberg 100 atr 243 or 308
savage stevens 200 in 243 or 308
your options are practically endless.

As far as scopes go, the redfield revolution in 3-9x40 with an accurange reticle would be a good choice.

MachIVshooter
November 19, 2012, 02:13 PM
Well, I use a Remington 673 Guide gun in .350 Rem Mag topped with an ATN Mk 390 Paladin NVRS. But I only get to go after hogs once a year for 2-3 days, so I want to be sure that I have every edge in case we don't see many. So far, we only ever see them at night, the shot angles aren't always great, and they spook easily.

LeonCarr
November 19, 2012, 02:27 PM
I agree with the distinguished gentleman from New York...the Remington 760/7600 pump is a great hog rifle.

A friend of mine has a Remington 760 Carbine with the 18.5 inch barrel in .30-06 with a spotlight mounted to the scope tube for nighttime (Legal in Texas for Hogs) hunting. With a 10 round aftermarket magazine it is devastating on hogs...I call it The Redneck Assault Rifle.

Another guy I have hunted with on several occasions has a Remington 7600 in .35 Whelen, and it stomps hogs...period. 250 grain Remington Core-Lokt Factory Loads are what he shoots, and he has never had one run, ever.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Captcurt
November 19, 2012, 02:43 PM
If it works on deer it will work on hogs. Personally, I would not feel undergunned with a 22 Mag.

Texan Scott
November 19, 2012, 02:49 PM
ANY 30cal or 7.62 rifle. Lots of others! But you can't go wrong with a 30
An SKS is fine.

slickone
November 22, 2012, 10:38 AM
I appreiate the feedback. I am kind of favoring the Ruger American in 308. The scope I am not sure of.

CraigC
November 22, 2012, 11:01 AM
I like a fast handling .44Mag levergun for hogs with either a receiver sight or low power variable. They are typically shot at short range and in thick brush so long range cartridges and big scopes are completely unnecessary.

lovethosesooners
November 22, 2012, 11:27 AM
I have 2 that are really great for a little "texas hoggin"....

Remington 750 30-06 carbine (18" barrel) with a Leupold Hog Scope which includes an illuminated reticle-shoots 1 1/2" groups with cheap 180 grain core-lockt, does NOT jam, great handling rifle.

For day or night hunting, FNAR .308 with a Bushnell Elite 6500 2.5x16 and a wicked light green night light.....awesome combination!

Abel
November 22, 2012, 11:32 AM
The Ruger American with a Redfield Revolution 2-7x33mm.

GregC
November 22, 2012, 12:19 PM
I use a Marlin 1895 (45/70) with 400 grainers. Leupold Hog scope. Hit them just about any location at any angle and they will not go far! Using the low end on that scope, you can keep both eyes open for shots up close or in the brush.

adelbridge
November 22, 2012, 03:21 PM
Its not hard to kill a hog. Optics are more important than center fire caliber but when picking a caliber choose something that is going to create an entrance and exit wound for best tracking. I have hunted hogs with magnum handguns and 9 times out of 10 you dont get an exit wound and less than half the blood trail because the entrance wound is usually small. Its more fun to get up close and personal with a handgun but if it is your first time go with a rifle cartridge. Back to optics, hogs are mostly nocturnal and in Texas I shot 80% of my hogs in the dark under feeder lights or spot light. Putting a black reticle on a black hog doesnt work. I use a Vortex Crossfire 3-9 with illuminated reticle and it has been enough to take a moonlight only shot at 50 yards.

TexasPatriot.308
November 22, 2012, 05:59 PM
I use .17hmr all the time up to a .308. any caliber in between works, unless you got to have a magnum canon.

slickone
November 22, 2012, 06:35 PM
Wow folks. that is a lot of info. Everyone has their favorite ways. My friend will be taking me out to Hog hunt in a couple of months. I have not hunted anything in my life. I have fired a lot of weapons after over twenty years in the Army but decided in my old age to shoot those nasty hogs. I think that would be the only thing I would hunt.
I really do appreciate all of your answers. The next thing is to sort it out and do it. Hopefully everyone had a great Thanksgiving.
Thanks

TIMC
November 22, 2012, 08:41 PM
I've tried all kinds of rifles for hog hunting, by far my favorite is an AR-10 style rifle. They are easy to modify, easy to mount optics amd can easily take multiple pigs because of the semi-auto design.

Dr_2_B
November 22, 2012, 11:00 PM
My friend will be taking me out to Hog hunt in a couple of months.

Envy.

Let us know what you decide to use and keep us posted on the hunt. I've never been hog hunting and it really sounds like a blast.

KansasPaul
November 22, 2012, 11:38 PM
My idea of a great hog gun is an AR15 chambered in 6.8SPC. 16inch barrel makes it light, plus you can mount just about any kind of optic you want. Effective range is 300yards. Lots of info available on the web regarding this cartridge and it's use to take hogs.

Paul

CountGlockulla
November 23, 2012, 12:04 AM
http://i687.photobucket.com/albums/vv239/BlayGlock/Scout.jpg

conrad427
November 23, 2012, 12:07 AM
i have a friend who uses a norinco m-1A clone. never seen a man smile so wide.

Inebriated
November 23, 2012, 03:40 AM
My favorite rifle for them is an AK. Not many long shots around here.

That rifle and scope combination with which you are most accurate and comfortable.

I understand that this is not the detailed description you may have been looking for but it is true. People very successfully earhole pigs with .22lr. I have seen a vid of Jim Shockey taking hogs with a .22 air gun. I would not be comfortable with .22 caliber rifles because I am much more comfortable with neck and lung shots which give you a larger effective target area.

What are the conditions that you will hunt hogs under. Walking up bottomland usually means pretty close shots. Baited shots are also pretty close. A 336 30-30 with Skinner sights would do you very well. If you are frequently shooting over 100 yards, a good bolt gun with well penetrating rounds in quarter bore and above "deer cartridges" will do you very nicely. Savage makes a Hog Hunter in .308 that seems to be both well designed and well received. I also think an older Remington 7600 in .270, .280, or .308 would make a great hog gun.

If you can brain shoot them with confidence, .223 seems a perfectly good choice but I am skeptical about 223 performance in neck and lung shots (flaming to commence shortly). I would say 120 gr or more at terminal velocities for your hunting conditions that provide good expansion. Unless, you have some kind of long-range hog hunting conditions, open sights or a low powered "shot gun" scope would do you fine - the Simmons Pro Hunter 1.5x5/32 for example is a great budget scope for such a rifle.

+1

Kachok
November 23, 2012, 04:04 AM
Any quality bolt action between 243 and 30-06 shooting a quality (deep penetrating) bullet should do the trick nicely, I prefer my 6.5x55 and 308. If you shoot the head or neck a 223 works just fine too.

plateshooter
November 23, 2012, 05:57 AM
I use my SAR1 with Ultimak rail and red dot, or an AR with a 20" barrel in 762X39 with a 1.5-4 scope. I shoot Wolf 154gr soft point ammo. So far, it has been 2 shots, 2 hogs, both DRT. Will be going for the 3rd one in March.

T.R.
November 23, 2012, 06:30 AM
I've had very good luck with my .308 rifle and 2X - 7X scope.

TR

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/Wild_boar_plus_Savage.jpg

Double Naught Spy
November 23, 2012, 09:17 AM
Lots of answers without asking much about the hunting environment. That can be significant, especially for the optics, and especially for distance and light level.

Wow folks. that is a lot of info. Everyone has their favorite ways. My friend will be taking me out to Hog hunt in a couple of months. I have not hunted anything in my life. I have fired a lot of weapons after over twenty years in the Army but decided in my old age to shoot those nasty hogs. I think that would be the only thing I would hunt.

While anything that will kill a deer can kill a hog may be true, the smaller the caliber (generally speaking), the smaller the sweet spots and the more precision that may be needed. Going with a bigger and more powerful round is the side to err on, going with a larger and more powerful caliber that you can shoot well. Since most folks shoot hogs at less than 300 yards, I think the .45-70 is a very good choice in this regard. Somebody above mentioned 400 grain bullets for it, which are great, but you can get a bit flatter trajectory and fine accuracy with Leverevolution 325 gr rounds. They are not only accurate (MOA accurate out of Marlin 1895s), but are one of the least expensive hunting rounds. I get about 1900 fps out of my Marlin with these.

People talk about the shield of a hog stopping bullets and apparently this can happen, but I have not see it happen with a proper shot inside 100 yards with .223/5.56 to .45-70. In fact, I have had my .45-70 punch through both sides of a 200+ lb. boar's shields and have seen it with .308 (just not my shot).

.45-70 has quite a bit of recoil, but it isn't horrific. I find it much less bothersome than shooting a 12 ga with slugs (another possible choice for hogs, especially shorter range hunting).

I like hunting with my 5.56 AR15 and most commonly go with CNS shots to the head and it works well, but these are usually at stationary hogs inside 100 yards and often inside 50.

Optics? A lot will work, but what sort of ranges and lighting. You can't go wrong with a good optic that has very high light gathering capability. You can go wrong with any optic that is darker. There are some fine broad daylight scopes and red dots that are not good low light optics and there is a good chance hog hunting will be low light or night hunting.

If low light or night, then you will likely want a light for your rifle (assuming legal in your state). You will need to be able to mount it. That may influence what optic, rail, rings, or rifle you get such that you have another place on the rifle to mount the light.

As a final note, since this is a new endeavor, I would stay way from newer of stranger calibers, not that they aren't fine calibers for the job, but for things like military calibers or classic standbys like the .45-70, ammo can be had at relative bargain prices. So if you end up not liking hog hunting and don't plan on hunting much anyway, you have a gun that will be reasonably less expensive to shoot otherwise and ammo will be widely available.

slickone
November 23, 2012, 10:24 AM
I believe I will restrict my shooting to 200yds or under. I am in my 70's and I am still a decent shot, but the eyes aren't what they used to be.. I have an AR15 5.56, but I thought it might be a little light for a Hog. I also have a P4 sniper 6x32 scope on it.
http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd42/SigVet/AR152012.jpg

Double Naught Spy
November 23, 2012, 01:04 PM
Find out the twist rate and put the heaviest Barnes TSX bullet through it you can. If you need help with the twist rates and bullet rate information, I can pull that up for you.

I am partial to the loadings from Silver State Armory and shoot their 70 gr. versions out of my 1:8 twist Colt. If you have a slower twist, you might want a slightly lighter bullet.

I do believe there are other commercial loads for the Barnes TSX bullets, so you aren't limited to SSA. I tried them and they worked very well for me and so I am a fan. You can get them from SSA or Sportsman's Guide (which is often less expensive), especially if you are member.

www.ssarmory.com/
www.sportsmansguide.com

For a one time hunt, try your AR15 with GOOD ammo like the Barnes I suggest or whatever you feel is best. Go to the range and determine its drop as precisely as you can at 50 yard increments and if you know that, then you should be able to hit within a couple of inches quickly if you can make reasonable range estimates in the field.

slickone
November 23, 2012, 01:56 PM
Thanks for the info. Mine is a 1:9 twist, 16" barrel.

sixgunner455
November 23, 2012, 02:03 PM
Don't go buy a new rifle for your first hunt. Use that AR, since you are familiar with it. If you end up wanting something bigger, you may find that building an upper for your AR is what you want to do.

Double Naught Spy
November 23, 2012, 02:24 PM
You might do okay with the 70 gr. versions, may be just fine. Try a box and see. Something a little lighter and you should be golded.

When you get out toward the ends of what will stabilize properly, some turn out great and some won't. By 200 yards with a properly stabilized bullet from quality ammo, you should still have accuracy to the capabilities of your rifle. Too light for the spin rate and it can come apart in flight and too heavy for the spin rate and it may yaw, pitch, and tumble and be WAY off trajectory.

In my 1:9 rifles, 75 gr. match ammo does not do well. The groups open up to several inches at 100 yards but in my 1:8, I get sub MOA groups. Out of the same 1:9 rifles with 62 gr. M855 surplus ammo, I get 1-2" groups. Make sense? So twist rate can affect accuracy, so for hunting, you likely will want the heaviest hunting bullet your gun will stabilize properly to maintain its accuracy capability and get the best penetration.

http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/index.php/t-158429.html

The AR15s I hunt with have a 16" barrels as well. Choose your shot placement and trajectory wisely and you should be fine.

Steel Talon
November 23, 2012, 02:29 PM
Wow folks. that is a lot of info. Everyone has their favorite ways. My friend will be taking me out to Hog hunt in a couple of months. I have not hunted anything in my life. I have fired a lot of weapons after over twenty years in the Army but decided in my old age to shoot those nasty hogs. I think that would be the only thing I would hunt.
I really do appreciate all of your answers. The next thing is to sort it out and do it. Hopefully everyone had a great Thanksgiving.
Thanks

First understand Hog anatomy for your kill shot.

*Neck: A neck shot will kill your hog every time.

*Boiler room : Sits a bit differently on a hog itís a bit lower and forward than what you would expect. Use the crook of his front ham to visually guide you.

*Head: The head shot. For it to work Ideally the bullet needs to traverse both hemispheres of the brain. A single hemisphere strike can be survived for a significant amount of time.

The hog skull has a taper to it so head on shots can deflect the bullet away from instead of into the brain pan. A behind the ear shot will turn off the light each and every time. Hence when hunters say the like to use a 22mag or the 17hmr. The ear shot is key to their success.

Nothing here is written in stone, but this is what my experience has taught me,and what I have learned from those I grew up hunting with. So basically you can make your caliber choice based on the anatomy, a 100yd max zero and scope ability to shoot in day, evening or night.

Now the next thing to consider since youíre a first time older hunter is recoil. Light recoiling calibers with readily available factory ammo are the .243 the 7mm-08 and the 25-06 rem. These three calibers are also effective on other large game and varmints if you wish to continue hunting other animals.

My .02cents..

Good luck on your choice and your hunt!
ST~

RinkRat
November 23, 2012, 02:42 PM
If my 30-30 will take down a White Tail I'm guessing it will drop piggies too.

ForneyRider
November 23, 2012, 04:12 PM
My brother just put an Laser Genetics ND3 laser designator on his 7mm mag BAR.

I would get a rifle that can mount some night optics solutions. Hogs are very active at night.

He also live traps them and puts them down with Browning Buckmark pistol in 22lr.

Scrumbag
November 23, 2012, 05:53 PM
My choice would be a .30-06 with a low power, variable, illuminated reticule scope. Also, get somthing with "chunky" cross hairs. Thin little wires get lost on dark pigs easily. The dot will help in low light.

Also, get a wide objective lens for good light transmission. As a guide, spend more on optics than rifle. The optic will limit you much more than any factor on the rifle in my view.

ATB and enjoy your hunting,

Scrummy.


(PS Ultimate piggie calibre in my view: 9.3x62)

Agsalaska
November 23, 2012, 05:56 PM
I have a western field 30-30. Don't know how old it is, but it is a hog killing savant.

slickone
November 23, 2012, 06:51 PM
All you guys are terrific and again I thank you. Not a negative post in the bunch. I find that really refreshing. I will take your advice and experiment with the various things you have suggested. Good Hunting to all of you.

slickone
December 8, 2012, 07:19 PM
Well everybody my new rifle will be here Tuesday. I ordered a Savage Hog Hunter in .308.
http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd42/SigVet/SavageHogHunter.png
I also ordered the base, rings and a Nikon scope.

snakeman
December 8, 2012, 07:27 PM
the ar will work fine. Use a quality soft point like winchester, remington, or federal and you should be fine.

RPRNY
December 8, 2012, 11:20 PM
Well, that looks like a great choice. 308 will put even Hawgzilla down and Savage makes a nice rifle. Open sights are great if you are doing any walking up hunting. I think you will enjoy both the rifle and the experience of hog hunting. A good light is pretty important.

I just used this light on a hog hunt in central Texas:

http://www.burnhambrothers.com/product.asp?ProductID=18662

http://www.burnhambrothers.com/custom/photos/SL-18filters.jpg

along with a Nikon BDC scope. The light clips onto a 1" tube and a large, easy to use on/off switch like a doorbell fits over your barrel and forend with an elasticated band allowing you to operate it with your front hand easily. With the amber lens, I had good visibility out to @ 80 yds (dropped a hog Tuesday night at 72 yds with this light). If you will shoot beyond that distance regularly, a more powerful light would be better, but this one is cheap and convenient.

wtxj
December 8, 2012, 11:58 PM
The model 11 hog hunter in 308 will work just fine with that scope. Low mounts will work just fine as they do on mine.

This will work on deer also :-)
Short rifle, light, great trigger
It will recoil just a little more on the bench, at site in then when you are out on the hunt.

I'm running Talley's and a Leopold on mine.

bluetopper
December 9, 2012, 10:05 AM
A single shot Handi-Rifle in 500 S&W Magnum.

Abel
December 9, 2012, 11:41 AM
'o6

Sky
December 9, 2012, 12:12 PM
I have killed hogs with AK, SKS, AR in 7.62x39 and the Ar in 5.56. but as others have said or implied the range really dictates the preferred firearm to be used. Most of the pig popping is done at night so I use a night scope when really dark which restricts me mostly to the ARs and 125 yards or less with the night scope.
I have not had a shot with the CMMG ARs in .22 but depending on the circumstances and range I would not hesitate taking an ear/head shot with the .22.Ar but I would plan on follow up shots just in-case. Pigs in my area of South Tx used be be on the smaller size before the Mountain Lion (s) scared them all off from our normal hunting areas.

MCgunner
December 9, 2012, 12:16 PM
I like .308. Night vision would be nice, but I have to resort to spotlights 'cause good night vision is stupid expensive. Hogs are 90 percent nocturnal down here. I've caught a couple out in daylight over the years. If you get 'em in light, it's usually right at dawn or dusk. Whatever scope you put on it needs to have a large objective to gather light.

Here's an SKS I had set up for the task for a while. I took the scope off it since. I used it this year to take a nice 9 point. :D

http://i50.tinypic.com/208wn43.jpg

JShirley
December 9, 2012, 12:23 PM
As a few have said, better firearms for you will depend on where and how you hunt.

Liberty1776
December 9, 2012, 06:50 PM
Well, I thorta like the BLR in .358 Winchester, myself...

altez
December 9, 2012, 07:42 PM
Lots of good choices really but like others have mention, gets good optics since you'll be hunting them mainly at night. But my main hog gun is an ar-15 in 6.8.

Kymasabe
December 10, 2012, 03:19 AM
As mentioned earlier, if it's good enough for deer, it's good enough for hogs.
My go-to rifles for hogs are either my Marlin 336 .30-30 or my old Chinese SKS.

Swampman
December 10, 2012, 08:03 AM
I recommend a quality M-14 clone in .308.
A goodly percentage of the time when hunting hogs you won't see anything.
When you see any, you're likely to see 30 or 40 of them at once.
A full power rifle with good handling and a high capacity magazine will allow you to make the most of those opportunities.

I have friends that do well with SKS's or AR-15's, but the .308 caliber, combined with a high quality bullet (I prefer Nosler Partition Golds) will allow you to blow a hole from rectum to brain at any reasonable range.

As far as scopes, the sky is the limit. If I could afford it, I'd hunt with a day/night capable ATN or Varo. Since I can't afford them, I usually use a Leupold VXIII 1.5x5.
Don't spend extra money for more magnification, a four power scope is plenty for hogs even at 400 yards.
A lighted reticle can be useful, but don't buy a cheap scope that's so equipped thinking that it'll give you an edge. Put the money into good quality glass, then, if you can afford it, tack on the features.

brnmw
December 10, 2012, 09:35 AM
Depending on how you like your setups:
A lever action .45-70 Gov't works very well. > Scoped even better.
Semi-auto I would go with an SKS 7.62X39mm, or an AR-10 7.62 (.308 Win.)
In a blind and out of reach from angry hogs I would not hesitate to use a bolt-action Win. M70 in either (.270 Win., .308 Win., .30-'06 Spfld.)

I mentioned in a blind because if I am out walking and stalking hogs I want a semi-auto vs. say the bolt-action. Even then I always carry a backup pistol just in case.

Strange Bob
December 10, 2012, 12:28 PM
I live in and grew up in hog country (they come up around my house because of the oak trees/acorns) and I totally despise the vermin. I .22LR a bunch but that is not the way to recover them. You can anchor them with the 5.56 and the heavier rounds usually can make recovery easy although I've done in quite a few with 55 grain FMJ's.

The .308 will lay 'em down and you'll be able to dress them out . The larger calibers are the go to because you do need the heavier rounds/higher energy bullets to ensure a no tracking situation.


Did I mention how much I hate hogs!!!! :D

longshot7.62x51
December 10, 2012, 12:49 PM
Mines a ptr91f with aimpoint comp2 and a magnifier in 3x.

RPRNY
December 10, 2012, 01:03 PM
See post #37. Mission accomplished.

slickone
December 10, 2012, 02:03 PM
Thanks everybody for your input. The rifle will be here today and I didn't realize the breakin procedure was so involved. The Nikon Buckmaster 3x9x40 with BDC reticle was shipped today. I'll let you know how it goes later.
Happy Holidays

FenceChargerIII
December 10, 2012, 02:36 PM
I don't see .223 Rem mentioned much, but lots of "Hog guns" are chambered for that cartridge. How would an AR-15 work, or a Mini-14?

MCgunner
December 10, 2012, 04:27 PM
Why would ANYONE rechamber for .223 to hunt hogs unless, maybe, the original was in .22 Hornet? :rolleyes:

.223s are for prairie dogs. Oh, sure, they'll kill hogs. I had to track a badly hit hog once. It charged me. I got a shot on his head from about 15 feet with my .357 revolver and it fell nearly at my feet. I shook for 10 minutes after than and vowed never to track a wounded hog again. there's plenty in the woods. Ain't gonna risk my health over one pig. If you don't wanna have to track one, you don't use underpowered rounds. If all you wanna do is hog irradiation, well, my 10/22 is enough. Sooner or later they'll die.

soonerfan85
December 10, 2012, 05:10 PM
My old Model 94 in 30-30 works just fine using 160 gr. Hornady Leverevolution FTX. IIRC, they give you over 2,300 fps velocity at the muzzle and 1600 ft lbs of energy at 100 yds. Good penetration and expansion. Puts those piggies down quick. Open sights because we seldom get shots at anything over 50 yds. If further than that I let my brother have the honors with his 7 mag. and fancy TASCO BDC scope. He likes shooting hogs with an elk gun. :o If he's not along I take my Savage 111 in 30-06 with Burris 3-9 scope. Inexpensive (under $400 used) and accurate set up and very effective on a wide range of critters.

soonerfan85
December 10, 2012, 05:29 PM
Strange Bob said: I live in and grew up in hog country (they come up around my house because of the oak trees/acorns) and I totally despise the vermin. I .22LR a bunch but that is not the way to recover them. You can anchor them with the 5.56 and the heavier rounds usually can make recovery easy although I've done in quite a few with 55 grain FMJ's.

The .308 will lay 'em down and you'll be able to dress them out . The larger calibers are the go to because you do need the heavier rounds/higher energy bullets to ensure a no tracking situation.

Did I mention how much I hate hogs!!!!



You guys got a real problem over there. One of my cousins is a regional mgr with John Deer and he hunts with clients over there pretty frequently. Never a shortage of targets.

husker
December 10, 2012, 06:44 PM
Down it Texas My uncle has been using a Ruger Mini 30 with outstanding results.
Thanksgiving dinner was very yummy

pikid89
December 10, 2012, 07:30 PM
My favorite, .22 Magnum

my other favorite, 110gr .270 Win

razorback2003
December 10, 2012, 07:39 PM
Do you have a deer rifle? Whatever you have for a deer rifle will work for pigs. I wouldn't buy another rifle just for a pest like hogs if you have a good deer rifle and are a good shot with it.

I saw you picked up that Savage 308 with the accutrigger and threaded barrel. That will be a great rifle that you can use for anything. Savage is an accurate rifle especially in 308.

Paul7
December 10, 2012, 07:52 PM
I dropped one with a .243 last week, my first one. Next time plan to use my 6.5x55, light recoil but penetrates well.

It seems with trophy hogs no gun is too much. I guy at the hunting camp shot a 450 lb.+ hog twice in the head with a .308 and it still didn't kill it.

pikid89
December 10, 2012, 10:02 PM
truth be told, the head of a hog is bigger than the brain...

once a hog gets large enough, it starts laying fat in the neck area, making the head appear larger than it is...that leads to what you might think is a head shot, but all it clips is muscle or fat, and fat dont bleed much

MCgunner
December 10, 2012, 10:38 PM
It seems with trophy hogs no gun is too much. I guy at the hunting camp shot a 450 lb.+ hog twice in the head with a .308 and it still didn't kill it.

That's why I don't really like head shots. Shoot off his mandible and he dies a painful death in the brush. Yeah, still a dead hog for you land owners, but I shoot for meat.

I never had a problem with the .308. I've never shot a 400 lb hogzilla, but I have shot a few 250 lbers DRT through the shoulders using a 140 barnes. I've gone to shooting a 150 Nosler BT for everything, though. I don't have a penetration problem with that bullet at just under 2800 fps.

TIMC
December 10, 2012, 10:56 PM
I have a couple of favorites for hog busting. An old 5 digit S/N Remington 700 in .308 that I heavily customized and the other is a DPMS AP4 LR308. Both rifles are topped with Leupold 6.5-20x50mm scopes, the Remington 700 has a VX3 LR and the DPMS has the Mark IV. They are outstanding rifles for taking pigs at any range, if I can see them, they die. That makes it pretty simple!
Here are a some I have take in the last couple of weeks...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v369/timc/70DB1BDE-724D-4D8F-9BFB-26C5F40D7D13-4439-00001026E08F205B.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v369/timc/C88CF563-28D9-4848-9AC4-E974AB8E1B97-7381-000017E05C54D6A8.jpg

This one was taken this evening about 5:30.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v369/timc/5185ED2D-570B-4012-8D69-7BA9A9C876CD-5260-00000BF84856FEF0.jpg

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