Rust preventer for long storage


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chaddy
November 19, 2012, 11:31 PM
Need to know what to use to keep my guns from rusting in storage in my safe? Cause my s&w bodyguard revolver in junk and I never shot it. I put clp and rem oil wipes to clean it but it didn't work. 500$ gun now ain't worth 20$...

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Certaindeaf
November 19, 2012, 11:48 PM
I'll give you $20 for it.
I'd try one of those electric heated rods that go in/are for your safe.

JTQ
November 20, 2012, 12:40 AM
Eezox seems to be pretty popular.

http://www.eezox.com

Drail
November 20, 2012, 10:44 AM
If the gun rusted while it was in your safe then your safe is in a really bad place. You need to monitor the humidity of the air in the room the safe is in and get contol of it with a de humidifier. If the safe is filling up with moist air every time the door is opened and then being closed you have a much bigger problem than can be solved with oil on the guns as you now know. Was the gun in a cardboard box or a fabric gun rug in the safe? What else is in the safe besides guns? I have been using Breakfree CLP for 25 years and I have never had a gun rust in or out of the safe. Remoil is not a rust preventative.

Greg528iT
November 20, 2012, 11:49 AM
I'd like to use the heated rod, but I don't want to drill a hole big enough for a plug to fit through.
I've been using the rechargeable moisture absorbing cartridges. Which reminds me, I need to check them and plug them in to dry them out.,

ColtPythonElite
November 20, 2012, 11:52 AM
I would rather drill a 1/4" hole than deal with rusty guns.


I use a Dri-Rod, monitor humidity with a digital gauge, and wipe down with Rem oil. I have guns that might not get touched for a year at times. Never had a speck of rust.

Certaindeaf
November 20, 2012, 12:07 PM
I'd like to use the heated rod, but I don't want to drill a hole big enough for a plug to fit through.
I've been using the rechargeable moisture absorbing cartridges. Which reminds me, I need to check them and plug them in to dry them out.,
Drill a small hole just big enough for the/a wire, cut the wire and splice/put on a new plug. Lots of safes already have holes, especially at the bottom.
If you have a firesafe, a hole might screw up that action though.

ColtPythonElite
November 20, 2012, 12:13 PM
Gun safe dehumidifier rods generally come with a EZ fit plug that you put on once the cord is thru....my safes are fire rated and came predrilled.

BSA1
November 20, 2012, 12:21 PM
Rig Grease.

http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/oils-lubricants/rust-prevention/rig-universal-gun-grease-prod31842.aspx

Vaccum seal storage bags.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/shop-accessories-supplies/gun-storage-materials/gun-storage-bags/vacuum-seal-storage-bags-prod42749.aspx

Look no further.

Greg528iT
November 20, 2012, 01:08 PM
Drill a small hole just big enough for the/a wire, cut the wire and splice/put on a new plug If you have a firesafe, a hole might screw up that action though.
Gun safe dehumidifier rods generally come with a EZ fit plug that you put on once the cord is thru.

I thought about cutting the wire. I was concerned about messing up the fire resistance, not that a 1/4" hole should matter much.. but...

I'll have to look closer at the heater rods.. I didn't realize they had them ready to assemble.

RaceM
November 20, 2012, 01:16 PM
Oil with lube of choice then vacuum seal.

chaddy
November 20, 2012, 01:42 PM
How bout zip lock bag will that work

Certaindeaf
November 20, 2012, 02:47 PM
I thought about cutting the wire. I was concerned about messing up the fire resistance, not that a 1/4" hole should matter much.. but...

I'll have to look closer at the heater rods.. I didn't realize they had them ready to assemble.
I was just thinking about my prior post. If you have a firesafe you could probably spooge some high temp RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) goo into the hole around the wire. That'd probably work good.

oldbear
November 20, 2012, 03:01 PM
My storage routine is as follows: Clean well, lube as normal, two thin coats of wax, place in "Bore Store" bag, and don't worry about it.

Certaindeaf
November 20, 2012, 05:06 PM
^
how do you get wax on all the pins etc?

19-3Ben
November 20, 2012, 05:22 PM
How bout zip lock bag will that work

You just got a ton of great advice that will work better than your suggested answer to your own question.

sgt127
November 21, 2012, 01:23 AM
Quick question, a S&W Bodyguard revolver is stainless, alloy and plastic. What rusted? Is it a bad finish? Smith had a run of bad "paint" clear coat on alloy guns for awhile. Is that it?

http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product4_750001_750051_800120_-1_757767_757751_757751_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

Certaindeaf
November 21, 2012, 09:27 AM
I'm pretty sure he means the old Bodyguard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Wesson_Bodyguard

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e8/S%26W_Bodyguard_left.JPG/250px-S%26W_Bodyguard_left.JPG

sgt127
November 21, 2012, 09:53 AM
Wow. Thats sad. I actually forgot about the old model Bodyguard until you posted that.

Next, when I hear the words "Military and Police" I won't think about this:

http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j277/sgt127/IMG_0039.jpg

:(

oneounceload
November 21, 2012, 11:26 AM
After cleaning, I wipe them down and place them in silicone socks in the safe with the Goldenrod and three of the boxes of silica dessicant. Here in humid FL, all is well

chaddy
November 21, 2012, 11:48 AM
No this is the new one with the laser.

Certaindeaf
November 21, 2012, 12:05 PM
Then I take my $20 offer back. just kidding

85win
November 21, 2012, 12:36 PM
A question for some of you guys who mentioned using a heating rod.

I have a small safe that is bolted to an outer wall, so in the wintertime the inside of my safe gets cold, sometimes very cold, especially overnight.

I debated using a rod but thought that a) cold air always holds less moisture than warm air and b) if there is moisture in the safe a very cold gun will rust at a much slower rate than a warm gun.

Is this line of thinking correct? I have never had a problem with rust from storage, although I do use good rust preventatives. Even now I am still debating whether to use a rod or not years later (like I said it is a small safe).

Thanks

Certaindeaf
November 21, 2012, 01:12 PM
You bring up a good point. If you go with a rod, bring the empty safe up to temp and then put the same temp guns in there. Putting cold guns into an immediately warm environment causes condensation to form on them.
If they aren't rusting I wouldn't worry about it.

BCRider
November 21, 2012, 03:31 PM
A question for some of you guys who mentioned using a heating rod.

I have a small safe that is bolted to an outer wall, so in the wintertime the inside of my safe gets cold, sometimes very cold, especially overnight.

I debated using a rod but thought that a) cold air always holds less moisture than warm air and b) if there is moisture in the safe a very cold gun will rust at a much slower rate than a warm gun.

Is this line of thinking correct? I have never had a problem with rust from storage, although I do use good rust preventatives. Even now I am still debating whether to use a rod or not years later (like I said it is a small safe).

Thanks

I'm afraid that your thinking is dead right in the wrong direction.....:D

a) All air has some moisture in it. The higher the temperature the more it can hold. As your warm house air leaks in and out of the safe or is exchanged when you open the door you end up with moist air inside. When it cools the air reaches the dew point and the moisture condenses out of the air and onto any cool surfaces such as your guns. Rust begins shortly after that.

b)Rust occurs just as easily at cool temperatures as it does at warm ones. So a cool gun with moisture condensed onto the surface is at just as much risk as one which which is warm and wet.

Two things you need to do pronto. First off insulate the safe or cabinet from the outside wall by sticking a layer of 1 to 1.5 inch blue or pink styrofoam between the safe and the outer wall. And if this is a basement floor then put a layer between the safe and the floor. Then re-attach using longer lag screws or whatever you're using. The insulation will greatly aid in preventing the insides getting too cool. Actually the ideal solution is to find a new spot where it's attached to an INSIDE wall. But if that's not practical then use the hard rigid foam insulation. And don't use the softer white stuff. The rigid insulation is also a vapour barrier where the white stuff is not.

Secondly, you want to warm the inside of the safe so that the relative humidity in the safe is reduced. Read up on "relative humidity" and how it changes with air temperature to understand why warming the air in the safe is an effective anti rust option. If you don't want to buy a rod style heater then installing a light bulb down in a lower corner is just as good but it runs the risk of being damaged where a small heating rod is more durable. You want the heat source to sit down near the bottom of the interior so it sets up a convection flow inside the safe. This also avoids having a layer of cold moist air down on the base. Use the natural convection flow to aid in circulating the air so there's no cold pockets.

85win
November 22, 2012, 07:16 AM
Thanks BCRider, I think I will take your advice!

usp9
November 22, 2012, 08:44 AM
I use Eezox

Ramone
November 22, 2012, 09:00 AM
Some common household chemistry can accelerate rust at an amazing rate.

Any bare steel in a room where someone has mopped with bleach will rust so fast you will not believe it.

orionengnr
November 22, 2012, 11:54 AM
What is "long storage"?

I have not shot a rifle/shotgun in several years :( so my few long guns just sit in the safe. I try to take each one out and give it a look-over and wipe-down once a year (usually during the Christmas-New Year timeframe) but I have surely missed a year here and there. Thank you for the reminder--that time is here again. :)

The safe gets opened maybe once a week (on average), either to take out/put back something for the next or the last range trip, or maybe to access some important papers.

I have been using Eezox for this annual wipe-down for the last six-seven years: I started using it after reading this:
http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

and this:
http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html

Eezox is pricey and can be hard to find (I've never found it locally, so I buy it mail-order and buy enough to make it worth the shipping, etc.)

I also use a GoldenRod, bought when I bought the safe.

Knock on wood, not a bit of a problem. The EDC and frequent range handguns get cleaned with Ed's Red (homemade CLP--google it), which works fine and costs next to nothing.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

C0untZer0
November 22, 2012, 12:10 PM
Zip lock bags are a bad idea, unless you zip your gun up in the bag while you're in the Mojave desert. You still need dessicants in that bag, even if it's vacuumed out, and you still need a protectant over the metal.

Original Cosmoline is still great for long term storage, but Rust-Veto 342 is an industrial strength protectant:


http://www.cosmolinedirect.com/?gclid=CL6RqPr54rMCFegWMgodxwIAaA

rbernie
November 22, 2012, 12:29 PM
I've used VCI bags with great success....

C0untZer0
November 22, 2012, 12:32 PM
Any bare steel in a room where someone has mopped with bleach will rust so fast you will not believe it.

You're highlighting a property of chlorine - it's highly reactive, and it corrodes steel, especially stainless steel.

There is an entrie category dedicated to the kind of corrosion of steel that comes from exposure to cholrine/chlorine compounds - its called CSCC - Chloride stress corrosion cracking .

And that's why using cleaners that have chlorine in them - like carbon tet, brake cleaner, carb cleaner, engine degreaser etc... can be bad for your firearm - especially if its stainless steel. There are carb and brake cleaners that say they are chlorine free. But unless it's printed on the can somewhere that its chlorine free - it's common for these cleaners to have Tetrachloroethylene or Trichloroethylene in them.

I don't know how much chlorinated esther Eezox has in it, but it does have some, and IMO it doesn't take very much of a chloride compound to start to cause CSCC, and that's why I don't use Eezox.

chaddy
November 23, 2012, 10:43 AM
Could I use space bags and put oil in them?

hso
November 23, 2012, 10:52 AM
In addition to the approaches already mentioned use on of the vapor corrosion inhibitor (VCI) products like Bullfrog or Zerust. I picked up a couple of small Zerust capsules at Lowes and I've ordered both off the internet.

marinetowgunner
November 24, 2012, 04:36 PM
a good coat of ballistol before every deployment is what all of my firearms got. One pass, let it dry, and store it. Come back a year later and good as new.

jaguarxk120
November 24, 2012, 09:15 PM
Long term storage==Cosmoline!:D

mtrmn
November 28, 2012, 11:48 AM
I use Fluid Film-bought a case of it on ebay. Works wonderfully. I have an automotive shop and bare steel, under a roof, coated with Fluid Film will be good for YEARS in the humid jungle climate of Louisiana.

I have found that most every "gun" oil will eventually evaporate and CLP is one of the worst. I use Mobil 1 engine oil in my ARs for lube and WD40 to clean (not lube!) the bolt carrier group. The carbon just wipes away.

Trent
November 28, 2012, 02:46 PM
CLP doesn't last long.

Break Free makes a "collectors oil" that is much heavier, thicker, and evaporation resistant. I've had guns coated in it for a couple of years now and they're still "wet" to the touch.

plateshooter
November 29, 2012, 06:38 AM
I've been using rig grease since I had rust in an AR barrel several years ago. Guy at the range told me that if you use oil in the bore and stand the gun on it's butt stock, the oil will eventually run down and you can get rust at the muzzle end. I thought he was just OCD until it happened to me.

Rig grease stays put in the bore. Never had a problem since using the Rig.

chaddy
December 2, 2012, 01:04 AM
Anymore

chaddy
December 2, 2012, 01:05 AM
Put them in zip lock bag with clp will that work?

Trent
December 2, 2012, 03:14 PM
Would the CLP attack the plastic over time?

chaddy
December 3, 2012, 11:14 PM
How bout them gun socks?

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