how much did reloading used to cost?


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hardheart
November 22, 2012, 11:47 AM
Searching old threads online, I saw one that mentioned Academy was selling 9 for 3.86 a box back in 2005. I can't remember exactly what I was paying, since I had a long stretch of not shooting. If reloading cost what it does now back then, I would think only competitive shooters would have bothered. Have components and equipment risen as much, less, or more than factory ammo?

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medalguy
November 22, 2012, 12:25 PM
No idea really but I would guess prices have risen about the same, percentage-wise. I don't know how you could compare the two.

Forgot-- I was looking at a friend's stash of brass yesterday and he had a box of 20 .303 British Winchester factory ammo marked $3.97. I'm guessing it was 30 years old? Wish I could even reload it for that today.

James2
November 22, 2012, 12:29 PM
Yes, components have risen in proportion to ammo over the years. I remember buying primers for $7.00 per 1000. Ya, guess that dates me. I started loading in 1957.

Krogen
November 22, 2012, 12:46 PM
I got started in the mid 80's. I still have some powder that was $9.95 / lb and primers that were $10.95 / 1k. But, my paycheck was less in those days too. What really strikes me, though, is ammo prices. I think they've gone up faster than handloading components. It hasn't been over 10 years since Lake City 5.56 was ~ 16 cents per round. Now 40 cents is a good deal, with 45 or 50 cents not uncommon. That has led me to re-start handloading for 5.56 mm, 9mm and 45 ACP. In days past, it wasn't worth handloading; now it is.

Cleftwynd
November 22, 2012, 01:08 PM
I used to but 7mmSTW factory rolled for 40-50 per 20, now I see it as high as 140, and brass at 70 per 25 pack!

MachIVshooter
November 22, 2012, 01:20 PM
Powder hasn't jumped temendously. Brass & Bullets have gone up significantly. Primers are what really took a hike.

If I were to hazard a guess, these are the approximate percentage increases over the last decade or so:

Powder: +10%-20%
Brass: +50%
Bullets: +50-70%
Primers: +200%-250%

Reloading equipment: +10%-20%

Now this would be for common stuff. A lot of the higher end or obscure components were always expensive, and have not changed much.

angus6
November 22, 2012, 01:40 PM
Academy was selling 9 for 3.86 a box back in 2005.

looks like I was at around $1.30 to load them then and now at $2.00 a box as free w/w are pretty much gone

highlander 5
November 22, 2012, 04:58 PM
I started loading in the early 70s as 44 mag ammo was $5 a box of 20. I believe I got it down to around $2 a box of 20 and that was with the original Lee Loader.

blarby
November 22, 2012, 05:18 PM
It was basically free.

You apparently used to be able to chew primers back into shape, grind powder off the end of the stove, and pluck bullets off the trees.

Any lead shot you needed could apparently be picked out of the toilet, thanks to the amount of lead floating around and through everyones body- and you could roll your own shotgun hulls out of dark shade grown Virginia tobacco.

Happy thanksgiving.

Magnum Shooter
November 22, 2012, 05:26 PM
I have a box of 100 Speer 158g JSP for 38 bought back in the early 80s, it’s priced at $ 5.49. Powder was about $12/lb and primers about $10/K back then.

Most competitive shooters want/need the best performance from their guns and the only way to get that is to hand load, regardless of price.

wv109323
November 22, 2012, 05:45 PM
I think where reloading has the biggest advantage is in "specialty" ammo. That would include ammo like Federal Gold Match and some of the game ammo loaded with partition or bonded bullets.
Federal Gold Match runs like $36.00 per box of 50. You can reload a compatible load with a cast bullet for $6.50 to 7.00 for 50. Ammo with jacketed bullets would be about $12.00 per box of 50.
The same thing applies with FGM in .308 Winchester.
It is hard to buy new brass and load some of the more common calibers and even break even with promotional ammo. This would include 9mm, .38 Special and .223/5.56.
Primers and Bullets have risen much faster than inflation . This is due to the recent wars, panic buying and the demand for raw materials such as copper and lead.

Arkansas Paul
November 22, 2012, 06:19 PM
I used to but 7mmSTW factory rolled for 40-50 per 20, now I see it as high as 140, and brass at 70 per 25 pack!

Here's new brass for quiet a bit cheaper than that.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/1601358387/remington-reloading-brass-7mm-stw

rodinal220
November 22, 2012, 06:41 PM
I remember being able to buy Win231/HP38 from HSM for $8 a lbs back in the early mid eighties. primers like $10 a thousand.It wasn't that long ago you could buy mil-surp 5.56 brass for $10-12 a thousand.Its insane now.Lead is both a precious and unwanted by some metal.

oneounceload
November 22, 2012, 07:07 PM
I used to buy 5000 209 primers for 85.00; but then I also bought a case of Remington .22 (6250 rounds) for $95.00 at the same show

VINTAGE-SLOTCARS
November 22, 2012, 07:22 PM
I have a bottle of unique priced at $7.99 a pound, a tin 8 0z of Red Dot at $1.88 and CCI primers at .97 cents a hundred also early 80's. Cast bullets were done by a friend for $20 dollars per 1k lead cost included. I still have several thousand .45 acp, 45 long colt, 44 mag, 357 mag, 9mm, and .380 I used for a mac 11. My buddy always needed money and I bought what I thought was way too many bullets at that time.

JLDickmon
November 22, 2012, 07:47 PM
Today, I broke open a brick of WLP primers I bought in the late '80's or early '90's.. sticker said $16.50

CZ57
November 22, 2012, 08:56 PM
A lot less! The biggest price increases have been with bullets and primers. ;)

gamestalker
November 22, 2012, 10:43 PM
Wll, I started out with Shotshell loading back in the mid 1970's and at that time some shops would offer powder in sample size quantities, like 1/8 or 1/4 lb.baggies as I remember it. The standard 1 lb. container of Red Dot was like $6 or $7. chilled shot was probably around $8 per 25 lb. sack, AA wads were $2.50-ish per 250 ct. or mabe it was 500 ct., 209's were like $12- $13 per K, and hulls could be found in vast quantities for .03 each. That was back when Blue Magics could be found every where, I always thought those hulls were a tad better than AA's, and paper hulls were also widely available too. I might be low balling it though cause I think a box of 1-1/8 oz trap / skeet loads cost about $1.50 per box to load and that was using the more expensive AA wads.

I started loading metalic like 1979 I think. Primers were easy to find @ $16 per K, powder was in the $8-$10 per lb. range, high end jacketed rifle bullets were $6-$8 per 100, and I don't remember what I was spending on brass. I know that on occasion when I couldn't find brass factory high powered rifle ammo for like .270 win, 30-06, and 7mm RM could be found for $8 per box for Rem, win, Federal, and the economy brands like PMC were about $6 per box. Ya, those were the days my friends and I sure do miss them.

I bought my first RCBS "O" frame aluminum press for $60 from Longs Drug store in Flagstaff, Az.., it is an RS2 or Reloader Special 2. Bought a Rock Chucker for $20 also at a yard sale. Bought my RCBS 5-10 scale at a yard sale for $5 and it was in perfect condition and still in the original box. I remember the guy had a $10 price on it and I talked him down. Bought my first Mec 600 JR for $89 or less brand new. Then in the mid 1990's I bought my second 600 JR on sale at Cabela's for $189 if that sounds accurate.

Bought my first several Rem. 700 ADL's for $180 or $190 from Kmart, Rem. Wingmaster 870 was only $225. or so, and the economy model 870 was $150 or $160 I think. Ya, things have deffinietly gone up a smidge you could say.

GS

cfullgraf
November 22, 2012, 11:00 PM
I kind of remember around 1980 being able to reload 38 Special cast wadcutters for a bit more than the cost of quality 22 long rifle.

Sheldon
November 23, 2012, 01:25 PM
I would venture to guess you'de save about half of retail for your reloads versus buying factory ammo if you get components in bulk quantity.....at any given time. Ammo manufacterers make a profit over what they have invested in the combined components used to make their ammo and for the most part that is what the reloader saves in doing it himself.

340PD
November 23, 2012, 01:44 PM
I just used up an old can of Green Dot from the 70's. $1.79/lb in grease pencil on the can. Most of my reloading costs were under $2.00/box for handgun calibers.

cpt-t
November 23, 2012, 02:15 PM
hardheart: I started reloading on my own in 1963. I bought a 218 BEE and a 50 round box of WIN 46gr HP`s for it were $4.25 a box. I bought 2 boxes a week to build my brass supply. At a Gun Show a few weeks ago I saw and old box of the same WIN 46gr HP`s for $90.00 plus. I was looking thru an old 1964 reloading manual and found a rececite, from Gunning Wholesale in Wichita Ks from for a 1lb can of 2400 powder for $2.69, and 2 boxes of 224 Dia 45gr Sierra bullets, They would have been a 100 bullet`s in a box for $4.28 for 2 boxes. and $00.21 taxs for a total of $7.18. Primmers Don`t quote on this but the figure .25 to .35 cents a packet of a 100, comes to my mind.
ken

RandyP
November 23, 2012, 02:24 PM
Most everything costs more today than it did "X" years ago though the actual value of a dollar fluctuates across many different standards - while reading some of the ads from 60's might make a person drool over the great 'buys' to be had, in the context of the times and workers' wages, they were not really great deals, just normal prices. Inflation is a strange thing indeed. lol

MachIVshooter
November 23, 2012, 04:23 PM
Most everything costs more today than it did "X" years ago though the actual value of a dollar fluctuates across many different standards - while reading some of the ads from 60's might make a person drool over the great 'buys' to be had, in the context of the times and workers' wages, they were not really great deals, just normal prices. Inflation is a strange thing indeed. lol

Ammo has more than doubled in the last decade. Home prices, new cars and average wages have not gone up anywhere near that. It's not just normal inflation.

hardheart
November 23, 2012, 05:04 PM
I use the rule of 72 for doubling prices. At 3% average inflation, prices from the mid eighties should be about doubled now. So I guess primers are about 50% higher than they would be if inflation was the only upward pressure on price.

Hondo 60
November 23, 2012, 05:28 PM
When my dad passed away in 2004, he still had some of his pay stubs from 1978.
He was makin' $6 somethin' an hour.
In today's economy that'd be about $20/hr. or so

And that was a decent living wage at the time.
I started my first job in 1976, I got $1.98/hr.

So while component costs were much less, so was the pay check.

rg1
November 23, 2012, 05:34 PM
Not very many years ago, like 2004-5, you could buy once fired military brass for less than $30.00/1000 and if you bid more on auction sites you paid too much. Now the same type brass runs from $50-85/100. Back in the 80's-90's primer prices were from 1 cent to 1 1/2 cents each or $10-$15 per 1000. I remember bullets back around the 80's costing $8-$14 per 100 for premium bullets. The cost of copper and brass has gone up and sellers in my opinion are taking advantage. Bet bullet and brass companies are making excessive profits?

Kerf
November 25, 2012, 10:39 PM
Yeah, reloading was much cheaper back then. I think I have some new, unprimed .348 Winchester cases, price marked on the box of twenty at $3.10 IIRC. I could go out and look but itís too cold out, Iím having a beer and watching TV. Those were expensive at that time. I donít know what they go for today. I think Iíd rather not know. A .270 Win box of twenty new unprimed were about $2.10 which really made the .348s look expensive as all get out. And I do recall paying $16.00 for a box of twenty .458 Win.Mag. loaded ammo, which was about 80 cents a round; thatís almost a dollar a pop.

What bothers me about the situation we find ourselves in today is that back then there were choices. Telescopic sights for instance; Lyman, Tasco, Weaver, B&L, Redfield, Leupold, Weatherby, off the top of my head were all competing with one another in terms of price and quality, and the average Joe could scope his rifle without breaking the bank. Whatís the price of a riflescope today that you can see .22 caliber holes at 200 yards with? I donít think the bank would give me the loan to buy one. I did have two: 10X Weaver w/ dot, and a 7.5X Leupold AO, $100.00 and $160.00 respectively. I call this the Walmart Effect; where a corporation or other entity( think $1250.00 toilet seats) comes in and begins taking/buying everything a company can produce. That company becomes totally dependent on that one large buyer and doesnít really care about competing for ones and twoies of the retail trade, since all of their competing riflescope makers have gone out of business. They can then begin dictating terms of trade to the sole remaining manufacturer. Makes you wonder what the cost of ammo will be in the future, doesnít it? Donít get me wrong here; I like my social security check they send me. Iím just not sure why they need all that ammo to cut me a check, too.

kerf

7mmb
November 26, 2012, 12:37 AM
Since I started reloading in 1999 the price of bullets and primers have at least doubled. Powder is more but not double. The biggest factor is the cost of metals have increased dramatically. I'm an auto mechanic and I know the price of wheel weights have gone way up too. If the price of lead in wheel weights has doubled so will the price of lead in bullets. The price of copper has gone up too so there goes the price of cases and bullet jackets. Primers are made with metal too.

4895
November 26, 2012, 12:50 AM
I started loading in 2006. At that time, I bought 500 Remington 125 grain SJHP bullets for .357 magnum at the low price of $26.99. Check the prices now on those bullets, if they are even in stock! I thought to myself I would never load 500 rounds of .357 mag. LOL! The price has more than doubled to over $60/500.

oneounceload
November 26, 2012, 01:25 PM
Ammo has more than doubled in the last decade

You must not have been shooting very long then. I started reloading in 1980. Take a good look at ammo prices over the last 30 years and you'll prices as correspondingly high then as today - there was a drop in prices about a decade ago - today, with commodity prices and the US dollar low value, we are lucky the prices are actually where they should be including inflation from before the drop through to today

ranger335v
November 27, 2012, 04:47 PM
In 1965, my first primers were $6 a brick, powders ran about $2.75 a pound and jacketed rifle bullets sold around $5 a hundred. Mail order dies were around $7 and a good press cost about $20. Sounds good NOW, but as a percentage of the average guy's wages per hour our things are quite a bit less costly today.

oneounceload
November 27, 2012, 04:58 PM
and in 1965 the minimum wage (which did not exist) was about $1.00- $1.25 / hour

jfh
November 27, 2012, 05:20 PM
I started reloading in 1989. At the time, I was working strictly with .45ACP using brass I was given (and still have), Win 231, WLPs and H&G 69 200-gr. LSWCs. My rounds were loaded to just over 800fps to meet Major in club competition. I built and set up a SA 1911 with NM frame ($360.00, blued) over the years for this load.

I could just sneak in for five cents a round in 1989--it went up about six months later, IIRC, when the price of power jumped, and then REALLY went up a few years later when UPS managed to get the HazMat surcharge going.

Until then, I think my 231 ran about $20.00 for 3 pounds, and a case (5k) of primers was just under 50.00. The brass originally was a few hundred pieces used that my shooting mentor gave me--but I started buying Starline--maybe for about $70/K? $90? Anyone remember?

The bullets were either bought locally at gunshows or from that Montana outfit that was so good, and then disappeared--the manager fraudulently operated the place for the absentee owner.

So, it was about one cent for the WLP, one-plus cents for the 231, and two-plus cents for the 200-gr. LSWC. I originally factored in something for the brass amortization until I understood good brass at the low-MAX ballistics I was doing essentially would never wear out.

Jim H.

Kramer Krazy
November 27, 2012, 10:02 PM
Not too long ago (2005), I was buying Winchester "white box" 100-round packs at Walmart for $7.34 for 9mm, $19.95 for 45 acp, and $17.95 for 38 spl. When reloading, I was often getting around $8/100 for 45 acp with Rainier bullets in '06. Interestingly, I stocked up on a bunch of reloading components back then and then sat out from shooting for a while. I just reloaded 500 rounds of 45 acp with Winchester TMJ bullets for about $9/100 a few days ago. ;)

whtsmoke
November 27, 2012, 11:33 PM
I still have two cans of Reloader 7 from way back that have a sticker on them for 3.50, i traded a Mauser 98 219 Ackley Imp. Zipper for two case of this stuff. my bench guns really loved it, wish i had the old zipper back again. young and dumb.

CraigC
November 28, 2012, 12:14 AM
Five years ago cast bullets were about half what they are now and primers were 30% less. Powder hasn't changed much.

ArchAngelCD
November 28, 2012, 12:43 AM
The last sale I caught @Dick's before the prices went up forever I was able to buy a case of Remington UMC .38 Specials for $42.90, case of 9mm for $39.90 and 45 Auto for $49.90.

These days instead of .38's being $4.29 they are $18.99.
These days instead of 9mm's being $3.99 they are $14.99.
These days instead of 45's being $$4.99 they are $20.99.

That's almost 4X (400%) the price they were and metal prices only went up 30%, just not right.

BTW, back then I could load .38 Specials for $2.78/box at most, today they cost me $5.49/box. Sure $5.49 is still better than spending $18 or $19/box but it's still not $2.78/box!

hardheart
November 28, 2012, 03:15 PM
I really wish I had stocked up 8-10 years ago, but I had barely started shooting at the time, and I didn't have many firearms to begin with. Hindsight is 20/20. The fact that light practicing/plinking for one summer with non-premium factory 9mm could re-buy my Glock is why I want to reload 9, despite the savings still not being that great if not shooting cast. I can't see not reloading .357, it's not even 'cheap' to shoot jacketed reloads.

korny351
November 28, 2012, 07:15 PM
Bear in mind, I started reloading in the mid-seventies. I found some old die boxes and bullet boxes.

RCBS die sets - $11.25
Speer 30 cal. 170 gr. JFP - $5.01/100
Speer .357 140 gr. JHP - $6.20/100

I think I was paying around $21.50 for Hornady 38/.357 158 gr. LSWC bulk boxes of 500.

Also found some powder and primers from the era, but the stickers were too faded to make out. Loaded some ammo awhile back with these components and they still go boom. So much for shelf life on older powder and primers.

ArchAngelCD
November 29, 2012, 01:21 AM
I really wish I had stocked up 8-10 years ago, but I had barely started shooting at the time, and I didn't have many firearms to begin with. Hindsight is 20/20. The fact that light practicing/plinking for one summer with non-premium factory 9mm could re-buy my Glock is why I want to reload 9, despite the savings still not being that great if not shooting cast. I can't see not reloading .357, it's not even 'cheap' to shoot jacketed reloads.
9mm reloads using a LRN bullet cost $5.04 /box. (Missouri Bullets)
9mm reloads using a FMJ bullet cost $7.04 /box. (Winchester Bullets)

Compared to factory ammo both are well worth reloading! Sure, like you said Cast bullets will cost you less but it's been a lot of years since 9mm FMJ factory ammo was available for only $7, not even the Eastern European stuff. I can't remember seeing any 9mm ammo available for less that $12/box since before 2007. Please don't quote me online prices unless you add in the S&H charges first. (which are usually high)

Reefinmike
November 29, 2012, 03:17 AM
2012- $1.25/box for 38/357/380 cast... im not going to complain...

drd
November 29, 2012, 09:49 AM
A friend gave me Rockchucker from 1980 the receipt show that the Press was $70 and the RCBS Dies were $15.00. Has inflation really gone up 500 per cent on those dies??

jfh
November 29, 2012, 12:39 PM
Inflation, the last time I checked, was generally conceded to have gone up about 700 percent since 1967, the year used as "the base year." Changes in measuring techniques at one point--tweaking the shopping basket to allow for production efficiency in food, for instance--were changed, I think, in about 1980.

My own rule of thumb--now that I am retired and living on a fixed income--is that the average inflationary cost adjustment is noticeably over 700 percent because of the cost increases in food and fuel in the last few years. So, to see a product from 1980 having gone up only 500% sounds pretty good to me.

Our current advantage over the inflation base of 700 for certain items--think small tools and clothing, for instance--comes from the fact most of these are now made in China or other third-word countries effectively paying much less than a skilled worker here ears.

Complex manufactured items still seem to follow the rate, however. My Mustang Fastback, bought new in 1967, Listed out at $3991 fairly-well equipped for the time and sold for $3324 plus the 3% sales tax. A nominally-similar model this year would run over $28-29,000 list--and its sales price should show the 700-plus% increase in price over my 1967.

If you want to get politically active about this, think of it in terms of your dollar's shrinking value--you know, the money you work so hard for, and maybe even try to save--if only to be able to buy less with it in a few years.

But, I digress. Let's keep the thread on track; sorry.

Jim H.

Blue68f100
November 29, 2012, 03:38 PM
In 1977 I was buying primers for $8.50/k, powder was $2-3/lb, I was buying 357 147gr SWC for $8.5/k. Yes things have gone up considerably.

hardheart
November 29, 2012, 04:28 PM
A friend gave me Rockchucker from 1980 the receipt show that the Press was $70 and the RCBS Dies were $15.00. Has inflation really gone up 500 per cent on those dies??
The dies should only be about $40 if it was strictly the change in the purchasing power of the dollar. It really seems the last decade has been the most harsh on the pricing of components.

Sort of like the price of gas, I remember working in the oilfield and crude was at $18 a barrel and we were overjoyed at $30 a barrel because it meant the oil companies would send more work our way with increased exploration budgets. A little over a decade later and I wish crude was priced at those levels again, while the number of Benz, BMW, Porsche and even Ferrari autos in the area is rising steadily.

ArchAngelCD
November 30, 2012, 01:09 AM
The dies should only be about $40 if it was strictly the change in the purchasing power of the dollar. It really seems the last decade has been the most harsh on the pricing of components.
Actually, it's been more the past 4 years than the past 10. :fire:

Guard Duck
December 1, 2012, 08:46 AM
OK. My first post, and it'll be a nostagia one.
I started loading shotshells in 1969. A 25 lb. bag of shot was $6.95, shooting up to $12 at times, and we'd really freak out over that.
Red Dot was about $2 a pound, and an LGS sold it LOOSE, i.e. "Hey Chet. I need 3 pounds of Red Dot." and he'd return from the back with a paper bag full of powder. Double-bagged for safety, of course.
Primers were .95 per 100, $8 per 1000, but who could afford a thousand at once?
I still have a can of IMR-4198 with the price sticker showing $2.95 on it.
Sierra .44 caliber, 240 gr. JHC bullets were $4.95 per 100.
W296 powder, if you could find it, was $3.95 a pound. (Good grief!)

I got out of shooting and reloading for about 20 years, and started up again around 2008, and I'm shocked - shocked, I tell ya - at what the price of components are now. But... I'm so glad that I got back into rolling my own. I don't miss going into an LGS and being told that: "No. We still don't have any (insert caliber choice here). Maybe next month."
Now, if they'll only ramp up production of small pistol primers...

Grumulkin
December 1, 2012, 08:53 AM
I started loading from a box of brand new Norma 243 Winchester brass I bought from someone on the web who no longer wanted it. The 20 cases cost around $2.50.

armarsh
December 1, 2012, 09:37 AM
No one has mentioned Accurate selling surplus powder. Including UPS (No Hazmat then!) it was $10 per gallon milk jug, if you bought a 6 pack.

bfoosh006
December 1, 2012, 12:02 PM
A few things that have caught my attention.... 1. you could buy surplus powder darn near anywhere, for really cheap. 2. Shipping and Handling costs have really skyrocketed at some suppliers.... Fuel costs have an adverse effect on all aspects of our hobby, hauling lead and copper and brass from point a to point b costs a bunch more nowadays.

Soooo.... years ago reloading was cheaper.

Kerf
December 2, 2012, 03:36 PM
GuardDuck,

Welcome to THR, and thanks for the memories, (mine are similar). A lot of people don't know it, but guard ducks can be dangerous...

popper
December 2, 2012, 06:11 PM
3%/yr decrease in buying power. And the Gov lies about it. Clinton took autos and a bunch of stuff off the inflation list to make himself look better. Staple goods was about 2% until now. Expect ~5% from now on.

dickttx
December 2, 2012, 06:18 PM
Actually it, comparatively, cost about the same as today.
I bought a new Ruger Blackhawk 45 Colt in 1970 for $70 (after the 30% FFl dealer discount), but couldn't afford the extra 45ACP cylinder for an additional $7.

Ken70
December 5, 2012, 10:53 PM
I bought some old Handloaders Digests from the 70's and 80's. The prices look cheap compared to today, but when you crank in a dollar in 1975 was worth about 5 times todays money, then it wasn't that cheap. 90's and early 2000's were probably the best, money still had value compared to today and the prices hadn't done the big jump we had in the last 6 years. It was reallly expensive back in the 50's, not that I was reloading, but $1.50 per hundred for primers is about $12.00 in todays money. No competition back then, CCI was the only company selling to the public. The ammo makers didn't sell back then as it ate into the sales of factory ammo.

dickttx
December 6, 2012, 11:13 AM
Ken, not quiet correct about CCI being the only company selling primers in the 70's. When I reloaded in the late 60's/early 70's there were several companies selling primers. In fact the CCI's were relatively new on the market.
My 1972 Handloaders Digest shows primers available from Alcan, CCI, Federal, Herter, Norma, Remington, Hodgdon, and Winchester. The list prices it showed ranged from $5.30 for Herters to $9.30.
I have a lot of those 1970 era Gun Digest, Handloader's Digest, etc. Enjoyable reading.

Ken70
December 6, 2012, 01:15 PM
It was the 50's that CCI was the only game in town for primers. Later the rest of them got into it.

When I compare prices on some of the stuff I bought 30 or 40 years ago, I can see why I was always having to save up before I could buy it. Very little competition, everybody seemed to compete on other than price. Not just gun stuff; electronics, clothes, furniture, appliances. I remember going into a Price Club and marveling at the prices, something that was $50 at Sears, $35 at Price Club. And they were still making a profit. This was about 1987...

dickttx
December 6, 2012, 05:16 PM
I remember that too. In 1980 I bought a Burrough B-92 (mini computer) with client accounting and payroll programs. The main unit weighed 800 pounds. $40,000. Seven years later I replaced it with a PC, printer and programs for client accounting, payroll, depreciation, and tax preparation for less than the annual maintenance contract on the Burroughs. Everyone I have bought since has been cheaper than the previous one.

Baryngyl
December 7, 2012, 05:20 AM
When I very first started reloading about 14-15 years ago I was getting primers for $.99 to $1.39 per 100, my 243 and 308 bullets were $8.99 per 100, powder was $14.99 or $15.99 a LB.
Started reloading shotshells about 9 years ago and shot was $13.99 a 25LB bag at Connies Components, $20.00 for 2.2LBs of REX powder (can not even find REX now).


Michael Grace

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