Your calibre preferences for Africa


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Readyrod
November 25, 2012, 10:48 AM
I'm not interested so much in the best caliber/rifle for Africa cause I know it depends but I was wondering, for those of you who hunt Africa, what calibers/rifles do you personally like for the hunts that you like to do? If you want to add some good stories of your hunts feel free, I ain't going to complain. (yea I'm fishing for hunting stories)

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MCgunner
November 25, 2012, 11:18 AM
H&Hhunter we be along soon. :D

Boxhead
November 25, 2012, 12:16 PM
Though used only on plains game, we have used the 9.3x62, 358 Win, 8x57 and 7x57 with complete satisfaction on 30 or so critters. The 9.3 was used on eland and "the rest" while the others were used on "the rest" kudu/wildebeast/gemsbuck on down. If eland were in the hunt I would still prefer the 9.3 but know the others would do if required.

Grumulkin
November 25, 2012, 02:47 PM
For locales where shots will be in the 100 to 200 yard range or less, the 375 H&H Magnum is a good choice. For longer shots I like the 300 Weatherby Magnum. The aforementioned would be for rifle hunting. For handgun hunting, I'd go with a 375 H&H Magnum, a 444 Marlin or a 460 S&W Magnum.

Airline baggage policies being what they are now, unless one wishes to pay hundreds of dollars in excess baggage fees, one should choose wisely in what one takes and how it's packed. If only taking handguns; no problem. If taking long guns, one that breaks down into shorter pieces will save you money.

http://www.orchardphoto.com/j19ud-87.jpg

Rifle and handgun packed in airline acceptable gun case that meets airline requirements for size and weight.

gbran
November 25, 2012, 10:04 PM
I'm wondering, very small game aside, can Africa be attacked with 3 calibers?

Dangerous game.
Large game.
Medium, smaller game.

Robert
November 25, 2012, 10:25 PM
Run a search on H&Hhunter, then settle in and enjoy the hundreds of threads and posts he has given us on this subject over the years. I know for a fact that he has used his 375H&H to take Cape Buffalo. He also carries a 470NE as well as others.

Grumulkin
November 26, 2012, 07:34 AM
I'm wondering, very small game aside, can Africa be attacked with 3 calibers?

Dangerous game.
Large game.
Medium, smaller game.
Easily; you just have to pick the right projectiles. In fact you can do it all with two even for the little stuff.

1. 375 H&H Magnum for everything from Dassies to Elephant. The little stuff and the really big stuff get FMJs or solids and everything else gets expanding bullets.

2. 12 gauge shotgun for any bird hunting you wish to do and for some of the very small and fast moving antelope.

Readyrod
November 26, 2012, 08:46 AM
1. 375 H&H Magnum for everything from Dassies to Elephant. The little stuff and the really big stuff get FMJs or solids and everything else gets expanding bullets.

2. 12 gauge shotgun for any bird hunting you wish to do and for some of the very small and fast moving antelope.

That's pretty minimal. I've been wondering for a while if, since 12 gauge is always suggested as bear defense, it would work against lions or other dangerous African animals.

Grumulkin
November 26, 2012, 11:11 AM
A 12 gauge is not uncommonly used to follow-up on a wounded Leopard and it should work for Lion. I would be worried about adequate penetration on Cape Buffalo, Hippo, Elephant and Rhino but maybe it would work.

H&Hhunter
November 26, 2012, 03:43 PM
A .375H&H is always the right choice in Africa. In dangerous game country I bring a .375H&H and a heavy such as a .470NE double or a .458Lott bolt gun or depending on the hunt maybe a heavyish medium like a .404 or one of the various .416's is a very good choice for DG. In places where you are hunting Dg in more open country like the Zambezi delta of Mozambique or areas of Tanzania a scoped .400 of some kind is REALLY tough to beat. But the .375 always comes along and is never a poor choice as a back up or a primary weapon with the exception possibly of hunting elephant, cows in particular, in very thick bush. That is where an ultra heavy like a .500 of some type or even a .577 comes into it's own.

Why not a light rifle in DG country? Because I don't like walking around in serious DG country anything less than a .375H&H. If I were to get surprised charged by a buff or an elephant I do NOT want a .30 cal rifle loaded with soft points in my hands. And YES I've been surprise charged by elephants on several occasions.

For plains game hunting in non DG country I bring a .375H&H and a .308 or a .30-06. I generally find myself using the .375H&H anyway unless I am hunting light stuff on open country like Springbok.

Robert
November 26, 2012, 03:58 PM
So what you are saying is you really like 375H&H. ;)

brnmw
November 26, 2012, 04:23 PM
I have never hunted in Africa but one of my employers has, and I know he used a .375 H&H Magnum before and liked it. Personally I love the .375 H&H Mag. even thought I have never used it in Africa. I have heard of people using it on Cape Buffalo before.... along with a .45-70 Gov't as well. Both great choices for anything other than mabye a Hippo, Rhino, or Elephant.

gamestalker
November 26, 2012, 05:27 PM
I haven't been hunting in there before, but my boss has. He used a 338 WM and was told it was the lightest round the guides would allow him to use for dangerous game. He killed a bunch of big thick game with that round including a lion, cape buff, and a panther.

GS

brnmw
November 26, 2012, 05:47 PM
I am beginning to notice that "Employers" go more than Employees..... Sensing a pattern coming on. ;)

Readyrod
November 26, 2012, 06:11 PM
Why not a light rifle in DG country? Because I don't like walking around in serious DG country anything less than a .375H&H. If I were to get surprised charged by a buff or an elephant I do NOT want a .30 cal rifle loaded with soft points in my hands. And YES I've been surprise charged by elephants on several occasions.


Well that sort of says it right there. A hard argument to beat. Thanks H&H.

H&Hhunter
November 26, 2012, 06:50 PM
He used a 338 WM and was told it was the lightest round the guides would allow him to use for dangerous game. He killed a bunch of big thick game with that round including a lion, cape buff, and a panther.


Gamestalker,

I've always thought the .338 Wm would make a decent if not somewhat light for the job buff swatter, though it's illegal in many places to use on buffalo.

I'm guessing your employer was hunting in South Africa?

hq
November 26, 2012, 07:52 PM
After a couple of days in Africa with a loaner .375 (airline lost my gun), I had to get one of my own. It pretty much has made my old .460 obsolete; still adequately powerful but far less punishing recoil. If there ever was a universal caliber for the continent, that most likely is it.

I've also considered .338 Lapua Magnum, which is among the most notorious long range calibers currently on market, but it doesn't quite have the punch of .375. And hunting ammo may be difficult to come by, in case of another airline baggage mishap. That's always a consideration, especially if you forget to "tip" "helpful" airline and customs officials at the airport. In some african countries $50 goes a long way finding your baggage in record time, should something happen.

gbran
November 26, 2012, 11:40 PM
Found this; .375 H&H web page. I'm impressed and sold.

http://webpages.charter.net/375magnum/

The Big Game Hunter
November 27, 2012, 12:33 AM
I'm personally a big fan of the 9.3x62mm. This caliber has a wide range of applications with the right bullets and shot placement. I've shot and cleanly killed animals ranging in size from white tailed deer to elephant with it. If you use the right bullets, it does not obliterate smaller game like Steenbok or Dik-dik. At the same time, it has adequate penetration and power to take even the biggest dangerous game like cape buffalo and elephant when using controlled expansion soft points and solids.

Yes, the .375 H&H is slightly more powerful. However, the difference is pretty small. If you can't do it with a 9.3x62, you probably can't do it with a .375 H&H either. With both of these rounds, you have a much smaller margin of error when dealing with dangerous game compared to something like a .416 Rigby or a .458 Winchester, especially in a charge situation. Yes, there are better cartridges for dangerous game than the 9.3x62. However, if you want one cartridge to cleanly, ethically, and legally hunt virtually every animal in the world, the 9.3x62mm will fit that bill.

Please understand that I'm not trying to bash the .375 H&H. If .375 H&H weren't a great caliber, it wouldn't be so popular in Africa. I'm merely trying to bring attention to a lesser known and in my opinion, greatly underrated caliber.

hq
November 27, 2012, 07:59 AM
9.3x62 has the advantage of being about 10mm/.40" shorter than .375H&H so magnum-length action isn't needed. This fact offers some very interesting possibilities, my favorite being rechambering guns like Winchester 1895 in it. I'd love a Valmet Hunter/Petra in 9.3 for overseas hunting but legislation in some african countries prohibits the use of semiautomatic rifles and in many situations a classy lever action is a very nice alternative to a double rifle. A variation of Roosevelt's "medicine gun", one might say.

MCgunner
November 27, 2012, 10:32 PM
See, I'm just a broke Texas redneck, never been to Africa, so I ain't gonna weigh in on caliber. I'm having a good time reading an informative thread, though.

I was wondering, though, hg, about the 1895. Lever guns tend to be a lot more complicated than bolt guns or double rifles and, therefore, a lot more can go wrong with 'em. I'm not familiar with the 1895 action, though, but would seem to me that the KISS principle would be a good thing for dangerous game. Asking more than opining. :D

.333 Nitro Express
November 27, 2012, 11:42 PM
I'm planning for my first safari next summer--I'm going to either the Eastern Cape in South Africa or to Namibia. It's going to be a plains-game-only proposition, but since I've been dreaming of going for years, I'm more than ecstatic.

Here's what I'll be taking:

http://i1281.photobucket.com/albums/a516/Liomonte/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_5897.jpg

Ruger No. 1 in 450/400 Nitro Express, topped by a Leupold 4x; and Mauser 8x57, with open sights (or peep sights if I can find one that fits). I know that the 450/400 is probably too much gun for kudu & company, but going to Africa without it seems wrong. In all likelihood, though, I'll be using the Mauser most of the time.

Two classic choices that will make me enjoy Africa all the more.

P.S. I too am a big fan of the 9.3x62, and I concur with the accolades that it has received on this thread. I do not yet possess a rifle in that fine caliber, but it's only a matter of time until I do.

The Big Game Hunter
November 28, 2012, 12:45 AM
MCgunner: There is nothing wrong with taking a lever action to Africa. On my first safari I took a Marlin M1895 chambered in .45-70 and a vintage Martini-Henry rifle chambered in .577/.450. My father has hunted plains game with a Winchester Hi-Wall and a M1886. All are great lever actions and did very well on plains game.

You do make a valid point about using a lever action on dangerous game though. I would agree with you, but more due to the fact that it is pretty difficult to find lever action rifles chambered in a round that is powerful enough to ethically and legally kill dangerous game. People have done it with .45-70, but it's not legal in most places and even if it were, I personally wouldn't try it. If you had a M1886 chambered in .475 Turnbull though, that's a different story.

hq
November 28, 2012, 09:56 AM
I was wondering, though, hg, about the 1895. Lever guns tend to be a lot more complicated than bolt guns or double rifles and, therefore, a lot more can go wrong with 'em. I'm not familiar with the 1895 action, though, but would seem to me that the KISS principle would be a good thing for dangerous game. Asking more than opining. :D

Like The Big Game Hunter noted, lever guns are few and far between in calibers powerful enough for big or dangerous game. I've hunted in Africa with a Marlin 1895XLR, which is borderline as far as sheer power is concerned. Good handloads with heavy solids are a necessity if you want to hunt anything really big with it and even with them I wouldn't go after an elephant, hippo or rhino.

Lever guns admittedly are a bit complicated mechanically, but usually very reliable as long as the shooter knows what he's doing and has familiarized himself with them.

Winchester 1895 and 9.3x62 is a very interesting combination of box magazine feeding (allows the use of spitzer bullets), respectable power and ability to shoot several rounds very quickly when the need arises. A double rifle is great for one follow-up shot and with some practise, quick reload too, but personally I've found that by the time I have inserted the spare rounds from between my fingers, I've already fired five aimed shots with a lever gun.

Husker_Fan
November 28, 2012, 10:45 AM
I've not been to Africa, but have two friends who have. Both have hunted plains game on more than one occasion and have taken plains game from diker up to kudu and zebra. This was done in South Africa in areas with little to no risk of running into dangerous game. They used .30-06 and 7mm Rem Mag which performed well with Nosler Partitions.

Husker_Fan
November 28, 2012, 11:33 AM
Ok, this is a bit off topic, but you jerks really have me wanting a .375H&H.

What would you recommend? A drop block like the Ruger or some bolt gun? Cost would rule out a double gun (unless I win the lottery tonight).

H&Hhunter
November 28, 2012, 12:17 PM
Husker Fan,

if you want a general purpose .375H&H I'd highly recommend a Winchester in either the Alaskan or the Safari with preference to the Alaskan. Because it's a lighter more lively feeling rifle than the somewhat blocky safari version. With the following recommendation get the thing bedded before you ever shoot it. Winchester factory bedding is worthless. But after it's bedded it is ready for action. You can find a M-70 Alaskan in .375H&H on Gunbroker it's the Only place I've been able to find one. Some distributor has bought them all up and is selling them on Gunbroker.

Good luck and you are welcome from the "jerks".;)

hq
November 28, 2012, 01:20 PM
When selecting mine, I considered a number of different bolt rifles, from Winchester to Ruger, CZ to Remington and so on. I really wanted a Sako with battue-style full stock, but they weren't available at the time and when I couldn't find a nice, used Sako AIII, I ended up buying a Weatherby Mark V.

VERY strong action (great for my handload experiments), 60deg bolt angle for fast reloading even with a low-mounted scope and a factory accuracy guarantee, which the rifle exceeded in practice by a good margin. I also like the angled comb in high recoil applications. Bedding the action wasn't really necessary, even though nowadays mine sits in an all-out aluminum frame custom walnut stock.

Remember to take all recommendations from us "jerks" with a grain of salt and buy something you really like and want. The caliber is pretty much universal for all game and when your favorite rifle is chambered in it, you can take it to any hunt you want. Don't forget the scope; I blew my budget on the custom stock and while it now has a semi-decent Redfield borrowed from another rifle, I really want to install a 56mm Zeiss on it, complete with an illuminated BDC reticle. Dawn and dusk hunts with a large, quality scope are sheer bliss.

Husker_Fan
November 28, 2012, 02:20 PM
H&Hhunter,
Thanks for the recommendation. I, of course, don't think the people here who give me wonderful ideas on how to spend money are "jerks." My wife may differ though. :)

I'm off to do a search over lunch to see your other threads and maybe find a picture of a trophy room.

CraigC
November 28, 2012, 07:32 PM
I booked an ill-fated plains game hunt about six years ago. Biggest game to be hunted was kudu. The plan was to take a late model Winchester 1895 .405WCF after having it fitted with a receiver sight, swivel studs, glass bedding and a trigger job. Hornady soft points proved to be too tender for tough game and the switch to Woodleigh WeldCore soft points was made. Loaded with 400gr bullets, it is the full equivalent to original .450/.400 loads. There was some miscommunication between myself and the PH and I ended up cancelling and getting screwed out of my deposit.

That said, I have since picked up and moved to some acreage in Tennessee, which has soaked up most of my disposable income until the last year or so. The new plan is to again book a trip to Africa for a plains game hunt sometime in the next few years, for maybe two weeks or more. The same .405 will go along and probably the 98 sporter 8x57 I just found. I'll take my Clements Custom Bisley .44Mag along if the laws are still accommodating. They were then, not sure now.

I've talked to guys that have been out west hunting elk several times without getting a bull. I just couldn't see spending ten thousand on an elk hunt, with zero guarantee that I'll even see any elk when I can have a hell of a time in Africa for the same cost.

Robert
November 28, 2012, 07:46 PM
I love my M70 Safari Express, no matter how blocky it may be. But H&H is spot on, have the thing bedded by a good smith. Ask me how I know.

Readyrod
November 29, 2012, 12:12 AM
Looks like the 375H&H wins. I know it's been asked before but since we are on the subject how is the recoil, and how do you deal with it or handle it?

H&Hhunter
November 29, 2012, 12:28 AM
Recoil on a .375H&H is not heavy. I've yet to meet anyone who can't learn to shoot a .375H&H very well even small women and teenagers.

Robert
November 29, 2012, 08:31 AM
Recoil on my 375 is much better than shooting my 590 with heavy slugs. Standing or sitting is fine, off a bench it gets a little old but is still doable.

.333 Nitro Express
November 29, 2012, 10:44 AM
Here's how to handle medium and big-bores without developing a flinch:

1 - On your first trip to the range, shoot your rifle at moderate distances and STANDING UP. Keep your body absolutely relaxed as you shoot. This will allow you to rock back gently with the recoil, which will feel like a gentle shove rather than a punch. You feel the recoil only when you try to resist it.

2 - On subsequent trips to the range, once you no longer tense up under recoil, use the bench, but SIT STRAIGHT. Do not assume the typical forward-leaning position, and let your body rock back from the waist up (see previous point). Do not crawl the stock. The .375 does come back quite a bit under recoil, and the scope will hit your brow if you're not careful. Ask me how I know.

3 - If you start flinching, go back to step 1, and force yourself to keep both eyes open and follow the scope-picture under recoil. Play it as a game--see how many times you can do it every 10 shots, and try to beat your own record.

4 - Once this becomes a habit, you'll think no more about recoil. Besides, the .375 comes back slow and deep rather than giving you a vicious jab like a 7mm or 300 WBY.

I hope this helps

Readyrod
November 30, 2012, 08:22 AM
Thanks for the recoil advice. Much appreciated.

Boxhead
December 2, 2012, 12:27 PM
We, me and my three son's, have hunted the plains game of Africa, from porcupine to eland, with the 9.3x62 (250 gr Barnes X), 358 Win (200 gr Barnes TTSX), 7x57 (160 gr Accubond) and 8x57 (180 gr Ballistic Tip). All worked fine. I am in the throes of finishing a buffalo rifle and it is based upon a NH 416 Rem M70 Safari with Wisner sights, PT&G bottom metal and a soon to arrive McM stock.

Grumulkin
December 2, 2012, 10:11 PM
Recoil on a .375H&H is not heavy. I've yet to meet anyone who can't learn to shoot a .375H&H very well even small women and teenagers.
I would beg to differ on the 375 H&H recoil not being heavy. You have to remember there are those who think the recoil on a 22-250 is pretty bad. Just the fact that one of the above posters warned about scope bites shows how heavy it can be.

While the recoil is heavier than a 30/06 or 300 Win. Mag., I would agree that most can learn to shoot a 375 H&H Magnum well since it isn't as bad as some others. My technique:

1. Started out with a 7X57 Mauser; yes, I thought the recoil was bad and the muzzle blast even worse.

2. Got a 308 Winchester; that recoil was pretty bad.

3. Got an Encore in 375 H&H Magnum. At first I shot it off the bench with a Lead Sled weighted down with 100 lbs. of shot. I almost thought it was too much but persisted and was impressed at what a hammer it was. Yea, I was bleeding after I shot my Warthog with it.

4. I quit using the Lead Sled and sold it. I then got a 458 Lott with no brake. After shooting that for awhile off the bench, the 375 H&H Magnum didn't seem too bad. In fact, a 378 Weatherby (with no brake) doesn't seem too bad now.

I have 2 375 H&H Magnums now; one a rifle & one a handgun. It's all what you get used to I guess.

H&Hhunter
December 2, 2012, 11:47 PM
Just the fact that one of the above posters warned about scope bites shows how heavy it can be.

The worst scope bite I've ever had was with an unloaded .308. Long story, but scope bites have a lot more to do with technique eye relief and rifle fit than actual recoil. Anybody who "thinks" a .22-250 has bad recoil is over thinking.

Recoil is in most cases is about 95% mental and 5% real and a .375H&H is a medium bore with medium recoil that anybody who wants can learn to shoot very accurately and very well.

I agree though that it's what you are willing to get used to. Don't psych yourself out like I see so many shooters do, have a positive attitude and learn how to hold onto a rifle and you'll find success with just about anything you want to shoot.

.333 Nitro Express
December 4, 2012, 12:24 AM
H&H Hunter is absolutely right.

I had scope bite because I was using poor technique on the particular shots that gave it to me. It could have happened with any other rifle. I remember once when I sat all day in a deer stand, got fidgety as a result, and when the deer finally appeared (after sundown, when there was barely light to see), I got so excited that I welded my eye to the 'scope. And the .375 H&H reminded me that I shouldn't have (although the deer was worth the bleeding!).

Having said that, there's no denying that a .375 H&H *does* come back quite a bit. But it does so slowly.

H&H Hunter is also right in advising you not to psyche yourself out. If you use the recoil tips I gave you, I assure you that you will not only not suffer from the recoil, but you'll come to enjoy the sensation of a big gun feeling "alive" when you shoot it. I'm not a big guy at all, and I guarantee you that the .375 H&H is something you can put tens and tens of round through without getting sore.

Readyrod
December 4, 2012, 09:19 AM
If you use the recoil tips I gave you, I assure you that you will not only not suffer from the recoil, but you'll come to enjoy the sensation of a big gun feeling "alive" when you shoot it.

Sounds good. Thanks.
Thanks H&H too.

atek3
December 5, 2012, 02:39 PM
I thought I'd poke my head into this thread. This summer, I'm going to Africa for my first plains game. My only hunting rifle is a Tikka T3 Lite in 7mm Rem Mag. I'm happy with the rifle and my ability to shoot it well for most all of the game they have, but I'm a little concerned about Eland. If Eland is the only large game I'll be taking, would sticking with the 7mm RM be okay if I use the right bullet and stick to <150 yard shot? I've got 10 days to hunt a 22 square mile ranch, so I don't think I will be rushed into making a sub-optimal shot.

Otherwise, I'll probably purchase a second gun for Eland/Moose/Bear (in something medium-bore like 338 Win Mag).

On the other hand, I could skip the second gun and just add a true dangerous game rifle in 375 H&H or 416 Rigby, but having never fired serious cartridge like that, I'm a bit concerned about recoil. I don't have as much mass to soak up the foot-pounds as most of the other African hunters I've seen. I'll head up to my friend's land in Vermont and try his. That'll pretty quickly determine whether or not I want a gun like that.

apologies if this is considered a threadjack.

H&Hhunter
December 5, 2012, 04:10 PM
atek,

A 375H&H is NOT a "serious" cartridge from a recoil standpoint. If you can shoot a .338 you can shoot a .375.A .416 Rigby is upping the ante a bit though.

A 7 MM will kill an eland but is really really minimum on a critter that big.

Grumulkin
December 5, 2012, 05:14 PM
I thought I'd poke my head into this thread. This summer, I'm going to Africa for my first plains game. My only hunting rifle is a Tikka T3 Lite in 7mm Rem Mag. I'm happy with the rifle and my ability to shoot it well for most all of the game they have, but I'm a little concerned about Eland. If Eland is the only large game I'll be taking, would sticking with the 7mm RM be okay if I use the right bullet and stick to <150 yard shot? I've got 10 days to hunt a 22 square mile ranch, so I don't think I will be rushed into making a sub-optimal shot.

Otherwise, I'll probably purchase a second gun for Eland/Moose/Bear (in something medium-bore like 338 Win Mag).

On the other hand, I could skip the second gun and just add a true dangerous game rifle in 375 H&H or 416 Rigby, but having never fired serious cartridge like that, I'm a bit concerned about recoil. I don't have as much mass to soak up the foot-pounds as most of the other African hunters I've seen. I'll head up to my friend's land in Vermont and try his. That'll pretty quickly determine whether or not I want a gun like that.

apologies if this is considered a threadjack.
I met a hunter whilst in South Africa who was on his way to hunt elephant. He was probably 5' 6" and maybe 125 lbs. soaking wet. He was going to use an 8 bore.

As for Eland and a 7mm Remington Magnum, if you use a sturdy bullet in the 160 grain range and place your shot well you should be OK. You'd be better off with something bigger though. I don't think you'd get much more recoil with a 375 H&H Magnum than you would with a 338 Winchester Magnum so if I were you, I'd just go with the 375 H&H Magnum.

atek3
December 5, 2012, 11:58 PM
I don't have a momentum chart with me but my guess is that it basically goes 7mm>338>375>416 with roughly a step function increase in recoil from one to the next.

Again, hopefully I'll get to test out my friend's Sako in 375 H&H sooner than later

atek3
December 6, 2012, 11:01 AM
answered my own question:
http://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm

it's more like 7mm>>338≈375>>>416.

Given that, I think you're right about 375 H&H being the one to 'step up to'

atek3

H&Hhunter
December 6, 2012, 11:08 AM
it's more like 7mm>>338≈375>>>416.


Agreed.

Folks the .338 and the .375 both put out about 4,000 ft/lbs they fire similar weight bullets at similar velocity. therefore in equal weights their recoil will also be very similar.

CraigC
December 6, 2012, 11:57 AM
IMHO, if you can handle any of the smallbore magnums, you shouldn't have a problem with the .375.

H&Hhunter
December 6, 2012, 07:16 PM
I met a hunter whilst in South Africa who was on his way to hunt elephant. He was probably 5' 6" and maybe 125 lbs. soaking wet. He was going to use an 8 bore.

And of course it's an absolute fallacy that a small man feels less recoil than a big one. In fact quite the opposite. I big man soaks up more recoil than a slightly built man. Recoil tolerance is a personal matter and psychological one more than anything.

Connie Brooks of Barnes bullet fame is .500 NE shooter. If she weighs 130 lbs I'd be shocked.

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