When did the gun market shift to collectors & accumulators?


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bushmaster1313
December 2, 2012, 09:42 PM
IMHO, a very large proportion of the guns bought today by private citizens in the USA are bought by people (bless their hearts) who already have all the guns that they really need for defense, hunting and recreation.

I am sure that this has not always been the case, and in the not too distant past, most gun owners felt lucky to have a gun, and if they were real lucky, to have a rifle, a shotgun and a handgun.

When did the market turn to lots and lots of guns being bought by people who already had lots of guns?

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Agsalaska
December 2, 2012, 10:04 PM
Good topic,

I would guess since the mid to late eighties.

bushmaster1313
December 2, 2012, 10:08 PM
A trip to the local LGS or surfing Gunbroker shows that lots and lots of guns are being marketed beyond the basic rifle, shotgun, handgun.

I think it's fun.
Just wondering, when did the fun start?

In comparison, we are probably at that point with watches, but we are certainly not at that point with cars.

wojownik
December 2, 2012, 10:09 PM
I dunno if I exactly agree with the premise of the question. Firearms collections have been around since ... well, since there were firearms to collect. So long as there have been disposable incomes and accessible prices of firearms, there have been folks who have collected. I remember as a boy visiting Teddy Roosevelt's historic home on Long Island, and being awestruck about the collection he had been amassing since the 1880s. And my uncles collection that he'd been building since the late 1940s. And a neigbors since the 1960s. Collecting is nothing new.

Much of this discussion may already be occurring here in a related thread http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=686249

creeper1956
December 2, 2012, 10:15 PM
As compared to today's plastic guns, the guns of years past are, for lack of a better term "interesting". If you look at who are buying "steel guns", it's guys in their 40s or older, with the exception of the 1911... which has had quite the resurgence with the advent of $500 1911s that aren't total crap. Apparently, even the younger folks find the 1911 fascinating... if they can get one for the price of a Glock.
I am sure that this has not always been the case, and in the not too distant past, most gun owners felt lucky to have a gun, and if they were real lucky, to have a rifle, a shotgun and a handgun.
I don't find this statement to be true. In the 70s I had a much larger gun collection than I do now and even larger in the 80s and 90s. I've recently (the past year and a half) divested myself of many of my guns because I got cancer and needed fast cash... had I stayed healthy, I'd still have over 40 very high quality centerfire firearms and premium target air rifles. :(

rust collector
December 2, 2012, 10:41 PM
They are made to last. If you want to stay in business making such items, you must find new markets. Gun makers have been catering to collectors for hundreds of years, and started marketing to a whole new group of owners near the turn of the century--women. The assault weapon ban ramped up demand for black rifles, and what is the fun of a lego gun with only one upper?

It's a constant challenge, especially when there may suddenly be boatloads of Mosin Nagants or SKSs arriving in ports. Maybe even lend lease 1917s and M-1s. And when folks start putting a bunch of time and money to make these useful for big game, well, it's time to kick out as many model 70s and 700s as you can. Sooner or later demand wanes, tooling wears out, and the fun is over.

Gun makers are also creating demand by putting out better firearms. They have a limited window of opportunity with us baby boomers, and then it may be a long dry spell.

22-rimfire
December 2, 2012, 10:48 PM
I don't know. I think it has been this way pretty much since WWII and especially with the advent of "gun shows". I wonder when the first gunshow happened? I know of them going on since the 70's for sure.

maskedman504
December 2, 2012, 10:53 PM
Since the concept of disposable income and the advent of manufacturing technology. :D

Ignition Override
December 2, 2012, 11:02 PM
Here is one reason: other than milsurp rifles which were already damaged or otherwise messed up, my goal was to keep buying Enfields, trying to shield them from people who want to sporterize original rifles. Hoping my son will one day become bitten by the gun bug.

The original reason I bought a second Enfield (the first #4) was actually to limit wear/tear on my first, which was a #5 "Jungle". Then I discovered how many rifles had wood sliced off, metal parts cut off or holes drilled, and seldom found one in the original configurations at our really small shows near Memphis. Guys in Atlanta are much more fortunate, but I doubt that they appreciate it. Our gun shops seldom have any.

At my first shows in late '08, each time an original LE #4 was spotted, it did surprise me, and I had no idea how many more would appear at shows which often have none. This can ignite a buying habit.

stickhauler
December 3, 2012, 02:07 AM
I'm much the same with M-1 Carbines, I actually feel a need to nearly weep seeing how some people have butchered these noble warriors.

Actually, the money I've spent on firearms has actually been a better investment than my 401-K, they've actually increased in value. That 401-K seems to bleed more value every month.

I'll grant you, I knew a good many people back in my youth that had a small number of firearms, usually a shotgun and a rifle. Usually a single-shot break-down shotgun, and a bolt action .22 caliber rifle. I knew very few people who owned handguns. And in truth, back when I was a kid, if they'd tried passing a law that banned handguns, it very well would have passed and been accepted. The common belief was that people who owned handguns were likely those with criminal intent (at least where I grew up).

But I also knew some folks who had many guns, even back then. And I never thought them to be strange in any manner. I shared their fascination with well constructed wood & steel firearms. I was intrigued then as to how they functioned, and still am. I'm much the same with motor vehicles, though I can't afford that little habit as easily as I can indulge myself with owning firearms.

MachIVshooter
December 3, 2012, 02:34 AM
When did the market turn to lots and lots of guns being bought by people who already had lots of guns?

When people have disposable income, they buy what they like. Since WWII, Americans by and large have had a lot of disposable income.

However, I don't think the percentage of people with "lots and lots of guns" is as high as you think. There are (with a sizeable margin of error), about 80 million gun owners and 300 million guns in this country. That's slightly less than 4 per person broken down evenly. Now, say that only 1/4 of gun owners have more than one gun. That leaves 240 million guns for 20 million people, which is 12 per. Still not "a lot". Suppose 18 of those 20 million people have 10 guns each. That leaves 60 million firearms for the remaining 2 million owners, or 30 each on average. You can see where this is going.

In short, the number of people out there with truly staggering collections is really pretty small. It's a devoted subculture.

roscoe
December 3, 2012, 08:39 AM
When people have disposable income, they buy what they like. Since WWII, Americans by and large have had a lot of disposable income.

Ding! Winner!

Sav .250
December 3, 2012, 10:43 AM
Sign of the times........

ny32182
December 3, 2012, 10:54 AM
When "the economy gets tough", people go out and buy luxury items. It's a vicious cycle.

SigMic
December 3, 2012, 10:55 AM
I wouldn't think it's anything new. Just out of curiosity Bushmaster, do you think this is a bad thing? I read your question as if you think so, but then again, I'm terrible at reading into people's intents on boards like this, so I figured I would ask.

HoosierQ
December 3, 2012, 12:12 PM
Despite the realities of the last few years, the whole post-WWII economy is probably when the thing really took off. Prior to WWII more people actually needed a gun to put food on the table than today (more farmers, ranchers, trappers per capita than today) but those folks would be living on a pretty tight margin and thus own only those guns that they needed.

Post WWII, salaries climbed to the kind of adjusted level we see now, more or less, thus allow folks who hunt for sport, protect themselves, control varmits, and just plain shoot for fun, to accumulate more than they need do actually do so.

Thus we see guys with a dozen old Winchesters because they love old Winchesters etc., etc., etc. In my example, probably some of these same "old Winchesters" were the one and only centerfire weapon owned by some fellow living very close to the land in the early decades of the 20th Century.

medalguy
December 3, 2012, 12:35 PM
I don't think the disposable income thing really popped until fairly recently. I know for many years we struggled to raise 2 children, and it wasn't until about 20 years ago that I really began to have very much disposable income with which I could buy whatever guns I wanted. Sure, I bought a few along the way, but most people I knew didn't have the amount of disposable income they have today. There was some, but not nearly as much as today.

Of course, part of that equation is that I built and sold a business and retired, and I don't have the expenses I did a few years ago. Now I guess I'm one of those who already have a lot of guns and continue to buy more. Why? Because I can, and because I enjoy them. I don't shoot all of them by a long shot, but I still enjoy having collectible things with history around them. BTW I don't own any tupperware.....;)

eldon519
December 3, 2012, 12:42 PM
You pretty much answered your own question before you asked it. Collectors and accumulators buy lots of firearms, thus the market caters to them because they are the ones doing the buying. If you buy a handful of guns and call it quits, you're no longer a customer, so why cater to you?

SharpsDressedMan
December 3, 2012, 02:47 PM
Wouldn't they be the ones with the money?

Sniper66
December 3, 2012, 04:02 PM
As a society we seem to want more of everything...cell phones, computers, TVs, cars, more bells and whistles on our cars, so it makes sense that we want more guns too. Gun ownership, especially with personal carry, has become increasingly popular these days. I love guns and have about 15-16 of them...2 more if I count a pellet rifle and BB gun.

huntsman
December 3, 2012, 04:08 PM
When did the gun market shift to collectors & accumulators?

In my family it hasn't but I think when pre-64 Winchesters and Colts first doubled in price from what they were sold for when new.

itchy1
December 3, 2012, 07:10 PM
Because I can't bear the thought of the look on my son's faces if I left them a collection of sea shells.

EddieNFL
December 3, 2012, 07:29 PM
IMHO, a very large proportion of the guns bought today by private citizens in the USA are bought by people (bless their hearts) who already have all the guns that they really need for defense, hunting and recreation.

Need has little to nothing to do with it. We rarely buy guns, automobiles, houses, furniture or food based on needs. We buy "wants."

pharmer
December 3, 2012, 08:44 PM
It's because dollars are worth less every day. Buy a quality firearm, enjoy it as intended, keep it in nice shape. If you need or want to sell it 20 years down the road, you will certainly get your money out of it (unless we turn into England). Some people see this as a good thing and indulge freely. I'd rather have money that was worth something over a long period of time. Joe

bushmaster1313
December 3, 2012, 08:45 PM
Just out of curiosity Bushmaster, do you think this is a bad thing? I read your question as if you think so, but then again, I'm terrible at reading into people's intents on boards like this, so I figured I would ask.

Unspeakably bad

http://i1270.photobucket.com/albums/jj603/bushmaster1313/CIMG0073_0003.jpg

powder
December 3, 2012, 09:02 PM
naughty bushmaster!!( how much u need for the Model 37?) :)

When the econ. hits the dumps, people sell their guns, and we smart ones have held out to invest therein.

I used to study in my car, in the Gander MT. parking lot, waiting to see the cases going in: Gander wants to rip em, and I want to invest in new steel. Match made in firearms nirvana!

bushmaster1313
December 3, 2012, 09:32 PM
naughty bushmaster!

I confess that I was feeling very guilty about having so many shotguns to the exclusion of other worthwhile interests.
I did my penance by selling half of the shotguns and buying a handful of centerfire rifles.

helitack32f1
December 4, 2012, 01:29 AM
IMHO, a very large proportion of the guns bought today by private citizens in the USA are bought by people (bless their hearts) who already have all the guns that they really need for defense, hunting and recreation.

I am sure that this has not always been the case, and in the not too distant past, most gun owners felt lucky to have a gun, and if they were real lucky, to have a rifle, a shotgun and a handgun.

When did the market turn to lots and lots of guns being bought by people who already had lots of guns?
I am not convinced that your premise is true and you have offered no real evidence that it is. As long as I have been aware of being around guns (1970's) all the gun enthusiasts I have known were always looking for that next desirable firearm. People who collected muzzle loaders, military guns, hand guns, specific manufacturers, etc.

I suspect that what is really going on is that it seems much more prevalent because everyone is on the interwebs bragging about their collections or latest purchases. Because of this, we are more aware of how many people buy lots of guns.

That being said, I believe the advent of liberal presidents being elected and re-elected serves to speed up the acquisition process, especially for those of us who covet certain guns that will most likely be the first targets of non-thinking liberal presidents that insist on saving all of us from ourselves and inanimate objects.

DurangoKid
December 4, 2012, 01:56 AM
Collecting arms is as old as mans first arms. Why do you think you can go to a museum and see arms from the Revolutionary War or Civil War, F&I War. Guns from the Western expansion or "Cowboy" arms. Guns of Europe German and Swiss Yeagers dating to the 1500s. Thanks to gun collectors.:)

As for gun shows when did they start? The gun shows as we know them started in the 1950s. Gun shows were for gun collectors and shooters hunters etc. They needed a place to trade and find firearms not sold in hardware stores of the day. No dealers attended gun shows they were for private sales. The National Pawn Brokers Assoc. and Gun Dealers Assoc. saw Gun Shows as their enemy. The passage of the 1968 Gun Laws attacked private gun sales. A system for Dealers having an FFL and the Form 4473 was introduced. The new BATF was established to enforce these rules. Now full circle another lost freedom. The gun shows are now weekend "Flea Markets" for FFL Dealers.:(

wideym
December 4, 2012, 04:24 AM
I started to accumulate and collect guns when I came back from Iraq in 2005. I rejoiced it the fact that the 94 AWB expired and "pre ban" configurations were affordable once again. Then I started collecting all those guns I used to have when I was younger and never imagined they would be banned from importation. Then I started collecting WWII rifles, then pistols, and now I started buying guns that might not catch on like the SCAR 17, Vector Kriss, Keltec KSG, and PMR 30.

It helps that I'm single with no kids, just me, the cats, and a lot of guns (171 so far).

evan price
December 4, 2012, 06:16 AM
I started in the gun hobby buying only guns I needed. Then I bought only guns I would shoot a lot. Then I bought guns that I thought would serve a purpose. Then I bought some C&R guns that I knew I would never have another chance to buy at good prices, or ever. Then I bought some classics that I enjoyed shooting. Then I decided that since I don't do most of the expensive hobbies I used to do anymore that I'd start buying what I liked. Then SWMBO decided that I needed a $200 limit on unapproved purchases. It's amazing what kind of high-quality basic firearms you can buy for under $200 if you look around and discover where they turn up.

pockets
December 4, 2012, 07:42 AM
Nothing shifted.
Some people buy one gun and that meets their needs. Some people buy two guns and that meets their needs. Some people buy 12 guns and that meets their needs.
This is like asking; "When did the shift to owning 200 PEZ dispensers happen?". Hobbies and hobbyists come in all flavors.
Personally, I have owned a lot more than 5 guns for at least 4 decades.

Dentite
December 4, 2012, 10:01 AM
I know a lot of people who bought their first gun in the past 5 or so years. So while collectors and accumulators will always buy, there is no shortage of new buyers out there. That being said I don't have any hard data on the percentages (and I'm glad things like that aren't openly tracked to produce such data).

bannockburn
December 4, 2012, 10:25 AM
I would say after WWII when all the G.I. bring-backs and military surplus weaponry was imported into this country. Couple that with a booming post war economy and a larger segment of the population beecoming interested in collecting firearms, and having the means to do so.

mgmorden
December 4, 2012, 10:32 AM
You pretty much answered your own question before you asked it. Collectors and accumulators buy lots of firearms, thus the market caters to them because they are the ones doing the buying. If you buy a handful of guns and call it quits, you're no longer a customer, so why cater to you?

That's about the most clear and concise answer I've read. Why would a market cater to the segment that isn't buying their products?

il.bill
December 4, 2012, 10:59 AM
I confess that I was feeling very guilty about having so many shotguns to the exclusion of other worthwhile interests.
I did my penance by selling half of the shotguns and buying a handful of centerfire rifles.
If that was your 'penance', I would like to ask the name of your priest. He sounds like my kind of 'confessor'.

huntsman
December 4, 2012, 10:59 AM
The gun shows as we know them started in the 1950s. Gun shows were for gun collectors and shooters hunters etc. They needed a place to trade and find firearms not sold in hardware stores of the day.

yeah I had some older gun friends tell me about those fun times, I started going to gunshows in the early 70's and noticed a change for the worse by the late 80's

Romeo 33 Delta
December 4, 2012, 12:08 PM
A long time ago! Think back to the good olde days of the ads for Milsurps in American Rifleman ... you know, the early 60's and the first, great wave of "CHEAP" arms (of course, back then we all made a lot less per week). I've been a collector/shooter since the 60's and finally have reached a point where the guns I don't have, I know I never will (Jap Type 5, Enfield No I Mk VI), but that's OK 'cause I have enough to keep me busy and out of trouble. :D

FROGO207
December 4, 2012, 09:01 PM
I shift to accumulator every time the economy takes a hit and those that need the cash more than their unused firearm seek me out. Seems to happen with regularity as of late. And yeah it does help to be single and well established at my great job.:cool:

TennJed
December 4, 2012, 09:16 PM
About the same time the average house became 2500 sq ft, everyone has 2-3 cars and replaces them every 5 years, every house has 4 TVs and 2 computers

Zoogster
December 4, 2012, 09:55 PM
I think some of that is just perception.
The forums are going to have more collectors because collectors are people that have a high enough interest in firearms to seek out others and talk about them.

The gun stores though have had a lot of new buyers since the first Obama election scared many into thinking they had to buy soon. I saw many people buying thier first gun since 2008, or first new type of gun.


However collectors are also going to be a good market to cater to. Modern quality firearms are durable and can last a long time. Ammunition adds up, and to burn through enough ammo to wear out most quality firearms would cost many times what the gun is worth in ammunition.
So this means the reliable market is people that are going to buy several guns out of interest and not people that actually shoot the guns enough to need to replace the old ones.
Marketing to first time gun buyers is hard..how do you find them and market to them? Scare tactics to need a firearm for self defense typically. But thats not really an informed crowd that is going to appreciate many qualities of various firearms.
You also don't know they actually will buy a gun. So even knowing you found them is unreliable.
Compare that to collectors. You know where they are, how to market to them, that they will appreciate various designs including some that are only slightly different than one they already have, yet to them is still different enough to consider buying it.
They are often better informed, and will appreciate materials or quality that is beyond just function, and that you can charge more for. And they may buy multiple of such guns, and are likely to be in contact with other collectors and so may recommend further business yet.
So often times profit is greater too compared to some guy trying to get a defensive firearm that just needs it to fire rounds and doesn't want it to cost more than that other plastic gun.


As for disposable income being new. That is also perception. People used to be ashamed to have much debt, so the average person didn't owe much. Today it is normal to have long term payments for vehicles, massive long term debt for houses, nevermind credit cards and other debt. Is it really disposable income if they still owe half what thier house costs, but they are spending a fraction of that on guns or tvs or other listed devices?
It would seem that some decades ago people owned thier homes and vehicles a lot faster than they do today on average.
Maybe they were the ones that really had disposable income, it just didn't seem like it because they were spending it in smaller quantities as they made it, but what they did buy was in addition to the big ticket things they actually owned.

surjimmy
December 5, 2012, 12:05 AM
I believe it started in 2008.

Onmilo
December 6, 2012, 09:31 AM
surjimmy, no it was in 2004.
The market went flatline from 1994 until 2004 when the assault rifle ban was lifted but even then guns were being bought and sold.
I got into western black powder cartridge guns during the ban...

bracer
December 6, 2012, 11:06 PM
For some collecting fine arms show that they appreciate the skill of the gun smiths and the ability of a stock maker to pick out a stock blanks and turn then into a work of art. For some it takes years for them to master the skill to make fine arms. Most factury arms will look crude when compared with fine arms. Collecting fine arms has ben common for a lot of years.

akodo
December 7, 2012, 09:47 AM
it started at the same time as regular consumerism.

There was a time when people had one pair of shoes, one nice dress/suit and one older dress/suit...and that was that.

Houses containing 2 adults and 6 kids managed with one bathroom. Kids shared rooms and shared beds.

After WW2 the consumer boom was born.

Not only do people have more guns than they really need, they have more jackets, more shoes, more pants, more kitchen gear, more media equipment, more rooms, more everything, well beyond 'cover all your basics'


Of course there have always been the exceptionally wealthy who broke the mold by having multiple high end guns, but they also had multiple high end shoes, furniture, homes, cloths, etc.

Biggest difference now seems to be the rich have a pile of high end items of group x and the middle class has a pile of cheap items of group X. Maybe the middle class would be better off by having 1 high end item rather than 10 low end items

CZguy
December 8, 2012, 12:25 AM
akodo's post is very accurate. It makes me sad that we, as a society have become so addicted to things.

huntsman
December 8, 2012, 07:21 PM
^Worse than that Americans are addicted to credit

welldoya
December 8, 2012, 08:22 PM
There have always been collectors but I think the internet has fueled a lot of the interest in guns. People come on forums such as this one where the real enthusiasts hang out and talk about guns, they get excited about guns and go out and buy one.
I really do think the "hype" on the internet has fueled a lot of the sales.
Do you think Pythons would be bringing what they do without all the chatter on the gun forums ?
It's absolutely insane what some guns are bringing these days. And it's a shame that some of these guns will never be shot. People are just buying them to make a buck at a later date. Shooting them might decrease the value. A crying shame.

oldcelt
December 8, 2012, 08:36 PM
In my lifetime I have seen American people become very materialistic. It is just as akodo stated.

jim243
December 8, 2012, 09:40 PM
This is one of the more interesting descussions on the forum, not sure when this all started, I do not see it as a recent thing. We might as well blame it on the industrial revolution, Henry Ford or the endless wars that keep rolling around.

First, each time a war rolls around there is a sharp increase in the number for firearms that are produced, resulting in an excess of collectable ones from previous wars as well as excess production when the war ends. Costs of owership goes down and sales go up as well as collections.

Interesting thought, if 500 years ago Beretta had CNC machines to mass produce firearms, would we be speaking Italian today instead of english. Or is Henry Ford really the father of the ability to produce so many AR's today.

Why do so many collect more than one gun, BECAUSE they can.

Jim


I have to go figure out how many I have to sell, I have over the 20 per owner mark.

happygeek
December 9, 2012, 01:59 PM
As for disposable income being new. That is also perception. People used to be ashamed to have much debt, so the average person didn't owe much. Today it is normal to have long term payments for vehicles, massive long term debt for houses, nevermind credit cards and other debt. Is it really disposable income if they still owe half what thier house costs, but they are spending a fraction of that on guns or tvs or other listed devices?
It would seem that some decades ago people owned thier homes and vehicles a lot faster than they do today on average.
Maybe they were the ones that really had disposable income, it just didn't seem like it because they were spending it in smaller quantities as they made it, but what they did buy was in addition to the big ticket things they actually owned.


+1 I was telling the wife the other day while watching football that I remember watching the NFL back in middle school (about 15 years ago) and there was a lot of ads on for car dealerships talking about how they charged $X over factory invoice. I can't remember the last time I saw a car commercial that stressed price, heck most of the ones I've seen recently were advertising leases, especially the ones for overly expensive companies like Acura.

KC&97TA
December 9, 2012, 07:41 PM
I happen to like X-Mas... people sell things cause they need money, 'for the kids'... I seem to run across rifles/pistols that I don't need but can't pass up.

I'm sure there were other political events that have pushed the buying powers, but 4 events come to mind.

1994 - before the originial black weapon ban
2004 - after the ban lifted
2008- dem'o in the white house
2012 - reelection of a dem'o

Firearms really are "good" investments. Grandpa's Winchester 62 was $7 in 1933, today they sell for around $350, don't know what the originial price of a 1954 pre-64 model 70 was in 1954, but I'm sure it would sell for a decent profit over 1955 msrp. Pre-ban 1994 stripped lower reciever $50, after the ban $250... decent profit as well.

I haven't lost a dime on firearms I've sold... may have only made $0.01 on one, but I've sold a few for a nice profit.

Investments such as Gold/Silver will always have value, judgeing by the commercials for precious metal sales they seem to be selling precious metal as well, in the even of a total collapse lead/brass will play a significant factor in survival/wealth.

The biggest reasons for my purchases... I've done well for myself, after growing up poor, after wanting so many things as a child I can now treat myself.

browningguy
December 9, 2012, 08:05 PM
Since my kids graduated from college and went out to make their way in the world. Biggest pay raise of my life when the two of them got finished.

MAKster
December 9, 2012, 11:36 PM
Probably 90 percent of gun owners only own one or two guns. The people who have a collection of 20 guns are actually only 1 or 2 percent of gun owners but these are the people who hang out on gun forums.

Baba Louie
December 10, 2012, 08:49 AM
KC nailed itI'm sure there were other political events that have pushed the buying powers, but 4 events come to mind.

1994 - before the originial black weapon ban
2004 - after the ban lifted
2008- dem'o in the white house
2012 - reelection of a dem'o
Before that one could look to the 1968 GCA as well.
Political awareness and the fact that gov't prohibition, ban or limitations can, have and will occur will always sell prohibited or "possibly prohibited" items and things.

Coupled with disposable income of course.

BigJimP
December 10, 2012, 03:07 PM
I'll put myself - in the Collector/Shooter category .....I collect, but I shoot everything I collect ( they aren't just safe queens - regardless if they cost me $ 500 or $ 5,000 ...they all get used and shot).

I don't know if a collection is 5 guns, or 25 ...or 50 or more....

There have always been collectors of fine firearms.../ easily back to the 1800's...with people that had the money to purse the hobby. But I think modern consumerism probably became more widespread..after WW II ...but its directly connected with some kind of prosperity.

As part of the Baby Boomer generation...I have all my needs met...so I spend money on my hobbies...and guns and shooting ...are a major hobby. Some guys collect old cars, antiques, etc...(none of which is cheap )...but in the gun hobby - those of us that have way past everything we need - and many of us, have all the guns we want...we're still looking for a specific model, with a specific finish, etc...( like a special revolver, or whatever ) to fill one more niche in the collection.../ we sure don't need it ....but we like to have it ...

I like S&W revolvers...so in model 27's ...( a classic S&W revolver in .357 mag ) ...I have 4", 6" and 8 3/8" mod 27's blued...and a 4" and 8 3/8" in Nickel...but the 6" Nickel has eluded me.../ I see some that are beat up ...or past the engineering revision dash 2 that I prefer, etc....but I have yet to find that 27-2 Nickel 6" in excellent condition - even though I'm willing, in today's market, to pay $ 1,000 - $ 1,500 for it ...maybe more.../ and I shopped the big gun show near me this weekend ...found only one...seller wanted $ 1,000 for it and finish was ok, but bore had some spots I didn't like..so I passed on it...and the Hunt goes on....but I'm patient.

( and sometimes, the Hunt, is most of the Fun ! )......

chez323
December 10, 2012, 03:51 PM
I would say that I personally made that transition when I found these wonderful forums and there classified sections. Prior to this discovery I had what was necessary for my various hunting/shooting needs. But once I found the forums and learned about the different types, styles and varieties of guns that were out there i was amazed. And when one came up for sale that caught my eye and was within my means I'd pick it up. But I shoot the guns I buy with rare exceptions, not really into buying one just to look at it and keep it in my safe. I like to think of it as my 401G fund. LOL thought in reality most of what I pick up I hang on to and will pass down to the next generation in my family.

olafhardtB
December 11, 2012, 03:02 AM
How can I try one out if I don't have one? If I don't like it, I trade it or sell it. If I quit liking it away it goes.I don't worry about getting my money back out of it. If I want it I'll figger out how to get it.

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