Baiting back hogs that USED to come around


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KMatch
December 4, 2012, 02:08 PM
Need my pigs back for the Holidays!
Hi there! Got a question for ya on getting some hogs back for a bit of fun. A few months ago my inlaws started complaining about the hogs tearing up their property. It's 20 acres of flat pasture with cows and horses. I was doing a fair job of baiting and shooting 1 here and there, but was trying to not run them off until after Christmas which is the time both my son-in-laws will be itching to hunt them. BUT, wouldn't ya know it... I caught the lead sow of 1 of 2 known sounders in the trap 1 day, and 2 days later, caught 3 of her younguns in the same trap! Not my plans, as I was looking for a particular boar in that trap, but pigs never follow plans, now do they! :neener: Naturally, this has run all but a couple of random late night boars away. We don't keep the same hours. I just found out, a neighbor to this property has suddenly had pigs on HER place within the last couple of weeks. Hmmm... :confused:

So, I need to bait them back for the Holidays... This other property is 200 yards from my nearest location I can place a feeder which will be a "no-shoot" zone and 700 yards from the feeder they were hitting before. Keep in mind any baiting has to be done around cows and I already fenced the 1 feeder mentioned. What would your plans be based on the bit of info I tossed out there? Should it matter, this is an hour south of Houston, 20+ acres of flatland next to thick woods. Lots of distraction, as in, oil refinery, 4 lane highway, beer joints, etc, all within cussin' range so noise and distractions don't apply quite as stringent as it might for many of you. Largest on trail cam is likely barely 200 pounds, or, 24 inches at the shoulder. Just FYI. Oh, and don't tell my inlaws I'm trying to get pigs to show back up on their place! They think I'm doing a helluva job. :evil:

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Blue68f100
December 4, 2012, 03:33 PM
No need to fence any thing in, just taint the corn with diesel and every thing else will leave it along. Hogs like the smell, and it repels all other wildlife.

KMatch
December 4, 2012, 03:43 PM
I have to put barbed wire around feeders to keep livestock out. The hogs never touched diesel although the cows n horses love it - Oops! I AM curious if farm blend still uses higher sulfur content than the pump brew. If so that could be a difference as in the last couple years the epa has killed the sulfur content which is what I understand the attraction is. Anyone compared?

helotaxi
December 4, 2012, 06:25 PM
You actually have laws there that keep you from baiting them? If not, dig a post hole about 2' deep or so and dump a jar or two of molasses and a pound or two of corn it it. They'll smell it from a long way away and will dig out a bomb crater trying to get to all of it.

MCgunner
December 4, 2012, 06:34 PM
Hmm, I've never had this "problem".

I fee the deer. The hogs mostly eat it, though. :rolleyes:

KMatch
December 4, 2012, 07:56 PM
I'm in Texas so no laws outside of using hand grenades and I may be mistaken on that! I'm considering the posthole routine but that was a last resort as I'm trying to REDUCE damage. It just may come to that, though. "It's for the cause." Molasses more popular than syrup?

helotaxi
December 4, 2012, 11:47 PM
More "stink" to molasses. They can smell it from farther out.

jmorris
December 4, 2012, 11:57 PM
If you are trying to reduce damage, be happy you have run them off for the time being.

KMatch
December 5, 2012, 12:47 AM
J, I agree. The main difference, though, is the rooting is surface damage. The postholes turn into fishponds. I might suffer through fixing some but that's still a last resort. Now, once the kids get to hunt as I promised and baited them with hog pics, I plan to napalm the place, likely starting with a corral trap. In the mean time I appreciate everyone's help!

KMatch
December 5, 2012, 10:02 AM
Alright, now that I'm back on the puter and off the phone, here's my next plan... I intend to make a few batches of different stuff. 1, sour with yeast, sugar, beer. 2, corn n molasses. 3, I dunno... Diesel? No luck with that, yet, including soaking an old tree I've since removed but that was pump fuel IF there's a difference. I've got 600 yards of fenceline with multiple trails I intend to try these mixes out on. Too much work? Not really. But these guys have proven to be extremely picky and they don't follow the same rules I read about online and they SURE don't come running to a feeder like you see on TV. Corn in a pile? Forget it! It won't be touched. Pigpipes? Never touched! Sour corn? Mmmm, maybe here and there. Shrimp shells? Nope. But they'll tear the hell out of the land all around rooting! A couple years ago my SIL and I did put a couple holes in the ground, 1 with straight corn, 1 with some store bought wonder drug. As far as I know, that corn is still in the ground untouched. That's the kind of stuff I'm dealing with, so who wants to critique my plans above? Oh, and running them off to another place was never the plans! Killing them was. I wouldn't want someone running theirs off to MY place!

Certaindeaf
December 5, 2012, 10:17 AM
Talk to your neighbor. Go where the hogs are. throw 'em a bone

jmorris
December 5, 2012, 10:19 AM
J, I agree. The main difference, though, is the rooting is surface damage. The postholes turn into fishponds

The "surface" damage will still ruin a hay meadow and quite difficult to smooth back out. It can take many hours with a disc plow then harrow to fix the damage. If the field is strong with Bermuda grass, it will just ball up making it even harder.

What we do is bait In the "woods" or beside areas we do not want damaged. Corn on the bottom, Pigout or other concoction on top then a little dirt to cover it up. Covering it with dirt is to keep from having other animals set our radios off.

If they blow up the spot making a large crater, just keep digging deeper. The goal is to have one spot to fix not acres.

Don't worry, there is nothing you can do to keep them away forever your kids will have their chance.


game radios
http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/attachment.jpg

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/attachment-1.jpg

KMatch
December 5, 2012, 11:19 AM
The radio looks interesting and homebuilt. How about some specs on that? It started the gears in my head turning - driveway alarms for triggers tied to cheap 2 ways... Save me from re-inventing the wheel, would ya!

MCgunner
December 5, 2012, 12:50 PM
I bought this the other day. Figure to put it out back and bait a spot in the woods where I can see from the porch. :D 400 foot range kinda limits putting it out too far.

http://www.harborfreight.com/wireless-driveway-alert-system-93068.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_11813.jpg

KMatch
December 5, 2012, 01:12 PM
I saw those but the reviews were complaining about 20-40 yards or something like that. Does yours work as advertised? I only need about 100.

Blue68f100
December 5, 2012, 02:24 PM
I've used the gate alarms and they work well if you stay in range.

I looked at the wireless cameras and they were pricy. There was one guy in south Texas that used his wireless to trip the gate to his trap. This way it would only trip when he was headed to his place.

The sour corn has work in most cases. But these hogs learn from others which makes it harder and harder to trap them. The main thing is to eliminate the human scent. This is why it's best to have a trap just set idle for weeks before setting.

MCgunner
December 5, 2012, 09:03 PM
I saw those but the reviews were complaining about 20-40 yards or something like that. Does yours work as advertised? I only need about 100.

I haven't even taken it out of the box, yet. We haven't closed on the house. But, it will be a couple hundred feet max to the thing where I wanna set it up and the box says it's got 400 feet range, the box says....:rolleyes: :D We'll see, it's cheap if nothing else.

KMatch
December 5, 2012, 11:09 PM
Mcgunner. There's a video (youtube I think) of this driveway monitor being used as a hog alarm. Due to noise, he replaced the speaker with an LED flashlight head (low power) sticking out the front of it. Sensor in the feeder area, receiver on the dash of your truck, and the light comes on when triggered with no noise. It was a cool idea! The LED even responded to the high and low volume settings as bright and dim.

Blue68f100
December 6, 2012, 10:13 AM
Where I have mine setup at is 50yrds (mailbox) and 80yrds (trap area) off and they work fine. The one at 80 yrds has also been tested to 100yrds. I have the receiver inside the house setting on on the window frame, next to the glass. I have 2 on the same channel and 1 different for the mailbox.

jmorris
December 6, 2012, 11:21 AM
The radio looks interesting and homebuilt. How about some specs on that? It started the gears in my head turning - driveway alarms for triggers tied to cheap 2 ways... Save me from re-inventing the wheel, would ya!

Check out the 5th post in this thread.
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=319415&highlight=Radio


If you are close to the place you bait and have power the driveway alerts are the easy way to go. The one I have here at the house was cheap, works at least 100yds and can have up to 4 sensors.

I built the radio one because I needed a few miles range.

jmorris
December 6, 2012, 11:28 AM
This is the driveway alert I have except the plastic is black. It's around 110yds to the furthest sensor at the gait to where its located inside the house.

http://www.smarthome.com/7311C/Skylink-Household-Alert-HA-100-Combination-Set/p.aspx

der Teufel
December 6, 2012, 08:04 PM
I saw those but the reviews were complaining about 20-40 yards or something like that. Does yours work as advertised? I only need about 100.

I tried one and got about 65-70 yards range out of it before it went bonkers. After a couple of uses the receiver just started squawking whenever I turned it on, even if the transmitter was off. Maybe I should try another one - I like the concept. But the range appears to be about half of what's advertised.

KMatch
December 6, 2012, 10:08 PM
Alright, back to baiting pigs. Night before last, 3 big (for here) boars dabbling in spin feeder corn for about an hour. Last night, the same boars hit and not a bit of the molasses corn I tossed out for a test to be found, with some koolaide corn sampled only and the feeder corn pretty much untouched. Thanks, helotaxi! As a plus, they cleaned house in 7 minutes versus the usual hour on a long night when corn was hardly touched. So... What are some options for distributing a molasses mix like this? A posthole is a last resort I may still use and hand scattering is doable. The problem here is either doing this day to day or reserving this for a hunt only which takes away any option to condition them to show up closer to MY schedule versus theirs. Hints?

KMatch
December 11, 2012, 09:59 AM
Question: Why is there so much focus on postholes and no one EVER mentions a simple slop trough? I've seen troughs used in a few places including a spot across the river nearby which due to no pressure, the hogs are out in daylight in large numbers at this spot. I'm ready to dig a hole or 3 to bait some back in, but in my searching for ideas, I've seen NO mention of troughs and related feeding ideas. Why is this? Is it the "wild boar" rooting instinct? Not worth the time? Other? It seems like a good idea to me, but I've been wrong a couple of times before. I wrote them down, but lost my notepad... ;)

helotaxi
December 11, 2012, 04:50 PM
Putting it in the hole will keep other animals out of it.

KMatch
December 11, 2012, 05:26 PM
Putting it in the hole will keep other animals out of it.
Gotcha! My feeder is fenced in, though, due to cows.

helotaxi
December 11, 2012, 05:59 PM
Probably not an issue then. Heck, you could probably just dig a small trench rather than bothering to buy/move in a trough.

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