Cleaning scorch from cylinder of SS


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Pierce
December 4, 2012, 04:26 PM
When cleaning your stainless revolver how do you rid the face of the cylinder of the scorch left after firing?
I try to wipe with #9 after each reload when i go to clean I plug the chamber and then I scrub using magic eraser and #9 but its a pain though it works and doesn't score or burnish the finish.

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The Lone Haranguer
December 4, 2012, 04:51 PM
http://www.natchezss.com/images/products/KBGC221.jpg

I would not, however, get too carried away. I would certainly not let carbon build up until the cylinder rubs the barrel, but minor burn rings have no effect on how the gun shoots.

Seven High
December 4, 2012, 04:56 PM
Some options are Flitz or Simichrome polish, along with a rag. Also,if you can find one the old round typewriter eraser with brush will take it off. Less mess than the polish.

jr_watkins
December 4, 2012, 04:58 PM
Similar product,

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/647492/midwayusa-rust-and-lead-remover-gun-cleaning-cloth

I hate to see the scorch rings as well and this impregnated cloth works pretty good, but still requires a bit of rubbing. Works great to remove leading from the barrel as well.

CraigC
December 4, 2012, 05:02 PM
When cleaning your stainless revolver how do you rid the face of the cylinder of the scorch left after firing?
I absolutely do not. It hurts nothing, does not impede function, will be right back again next time you shoot and is FAR more trouble to remove it than it'll ever be worth. However, the various lead removal cloths ARE abrasive, despite claims to the contrary and will remove metal over time. IMHO, it's simply unnecessary labor and I would never buy an obviously used stainless revolver with a clean cylinder face.

ColtPythonElite
December 4, 2012, 05:14 PM
The black is carbon. A white ink eraser will take it right off.

beag_nut
December 4, 2012, 06:23 PM
Don't worry about it, unless it gets so thick that it impedes the cylinder rotation.
Or, when you want to sell the piece.

gerrym526
December 4, 2012, 07:19 PM
I've used Flitz with heavy duty paper towels (Scotts rags in a box-white ones) with very good results. Takes the scorch marks right off the stainless steel of the barrel and cylinders with not much "elbow grease" needed.
Have never tried the white ink eraser-but will do so to compare results the next time I need to clean SS.

Steve in PA
December 4, 2012, 07:31 PM
Well, I've been cleaning my S/S Super Redhawk with one of those cloths for over 20 years and there is nothing abrasive about them. It is the chemical in the cloth, not some type of abrasive mixture.

Shooters says to clean the bore because the residue may attract moisture, etc. But yet its okay to neglect the residue on the face of the cylinder? I'd never buy a S/S revolver that was neglected that way by its owner.

CraigC
December 4, 2012, 07:38 PM
Well, I've been cleaning my S/S Super Redhawk with one of those cloths for over 20 years and there is nothing abrasive about them. It is the chemical in the cloth, not some type of abrasive mixture.
Do you think I posted what I did because of something I heard at the gun shop? No. I tested it. It removes metal. I took a 400grit brushed finish to a bright polish in two minutes. It's abrasive. Period.


But yet its okay to neglect the residue on the face of the cylinder? I'd never buy a S/S revolver that was neglected that way by its owner.
It's not residue, it's carbon scorching, big difference. It's not neglect and to imply such is just silly beyond words.


I'd never buy a S/S revolver that was neglected that way by its owner.
Yeah, you do it to your blued guns too???

huntershooter
December 4, 2012, 07:47 PM
I'm with the "why bother, it'll just be back next time you shoot" school.
The OP specifically mentions "scorching", not carbon build-up.

BYJO4
December 4, 2012, 08:06 PM
I use a lead removal cloth and bronze brush to keep clean.

1 old 0311-1
December 4, 2012, 08:09 PM
http://i1136.photobucket.com/albums/n489/kcq1/P1020858.jpg


If it ain't turning blue you ain't shooting enough.:D:D Mothers polish, and Lead Wipes get it looking new.

45_auto
December 4, 2012, 09:49 PM
It's not residue, it's carbon scorching, big difference.

All it can be is either some type of particle (residue) or the cylinder metal itself is discolored. It's not discolored stainless steel, so what does that leave?

What does "carbon scorching" mean to you?

Hotshot10
December 4, 2012, 10:35 PM
I've used Hoppe's Elite (not No. 9) with considerable success.

Hoppes Love Potion
December 4, 2012, 10:50 PM
I have found if you polish the cylinder face with Mothers Mag, the carbon build-up is not as severe and much easier to remove. The Mothers Mag creates a very smooth surface and I suspect the carbon simply has less surface to cling to on a microscopic level.

gamestalker
December 5, 2012, 12:17 AM
I was reading a S&W owners manual that suggested not over doing it because some cleaning agents can effect the integrity of the steel. I can't remember the exact mentioned don't do's, but something like don't use steel wool or any abrasives or solvents not intended for firearms. Something about certain agents / solvents can absorb into the steel, thus degrading the temper hardness qualities.

I don't go over board with mine. I use #9 and it works well enough. I've never experienced any build up that impedes cylinder rotation using my reloads though. I would imagine SWC's, LSWC, and other non jacketed type bullets and powder types may develope heavier deposits than the jacketed loads I shoot though?

GS

DammitBoy
December 5, 2012, 12:23 AM
Mothers polish works like a charm.

Driftwood Johnson
December 5, 2012, 12:33 AM
I absolutely do not. It hurts nothing, does not impede function, will be right back again next time you shoot and is FAR more trouble to remove it than it'll ever be worth. However, the various lead removal cloths ARE abrasive, despite claims to the contrary and will remove metal over time. IMHO, it's simply unnecessary labor and I would never buy an obviously used stainless revolver with a clean cylinder face.

Craig C and I agree completely on this one. Once you have a bunch of revolvers, you will stop trying to scrub the carbon rings off the cylinder faces. NO, IT IS NOT ABUSE! It is simply avoiding doing completely unnecessary labor.

45_auto
December 5, 2012, 08:23 AM
It's definitely unnecessary labor, they don't hurt anything at all. But they also sell stuff to clean the sidewalls of your car tires. Whatever makes people happy.

I usually only clean mine just before I sell them to craigc as "NIB, never been fired".

DammitBoy
December 5, 2012, 11:13 PM
I wash and wax my truck and my motorcycle too, even though that process does nothing to improve the performance of either vehicle.

Different strokes fer different folks boys...

snooperman
December 6, 2012, 08:34 AM
+1 on what CraigC said, it is more harmful to use lead cleaning cloths as it will remove metal. I do not use it at all. When carbon builds up enough it will flake off on its own with general cleaning methods. There are too many harsh chemicals being used today to ruin the metal of fine guns over time. My 2 cents- Snoop

snooperman
December 6, 2012, 08:50 AM
I have seen a friend bring his cleaning stuff to my place and after shooting he sprays some type of foam into the bore and action to get rid of "gunk" and carbon. Now, he wants to know why the blue is coming off. He is obsessed with cleaning like many others. To each his own.

Master Blaster
December 6, 2012, 09:26 AM
You Know I always read about this question and I have to admit I shoot my stainless revolvers frequently as I do my blued revolvers. I shoot reloads, both Jacketed and Cast and swaged lead. My procedure is to simply wipe the front of the cylinder with a patch wet with Hoppes Elite (formerly known as MPRO 7) Gun cleaner, and then briefly scrub it with a brass brush, the double ended hoppes model that looks like a toothbrush. The stuff comes off, and although it isn't spotless all my revolvers have no significant build up after 10's of thousands of rounds.

USSR
December 6, 2012, 11:54 AM
Uh-oh, my 686 has 31 years of scorch on it.:what:

Don

PRM
December 6, 2012, 02:15 PM
Personally. I just clean mine and don't worry a lot about a little "color." If it really bothers you, get some Mother's Mag Polish and a hand towel. It will pretty much just wipe off.

beatledog7
December 6, 2012, 03:35 PM
Why remove it? I'm not saying you should let it cake up and interfere with function, but to me that left-behind carbon color gives a revolver character. Like when I'm buying a used car, I get suspicious if a revolver I'm considering looks too clean.

SharpsDressedMan
December 6, 2012, 07:12 PM
Way back i nthe early 1970's I had some of the early S&W stainless guns, and I think one time I used Zud (?), a household stainless steel sink cleaner. It took the carbon off the front of the cylinder so well, it looked like a new gun. Don't know if they still make that product, but a good stainless cleaner might work as well. I saw no harmful effects. Justy looked new; even when I sold it. :rolleyes:

788Ham
December 7, 2012, 01:11 AM
Get some Mother's mag and wheel cleaner, it'll clean that thing up like new, and won't wear the metal down either!

1 old 0311-1
December 7, 2012, 02:12 PM
Get some Mother's mag and wheel cleaner, it'll clean that thing up like new, and won't wear the metal down either!



Actually Mothers is an abrasive, just the mildest one. I have tried them all.
http://i1136.photobucket.com/albums/n489/kcq1/P1010930.jpg

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