Does muzzle/gap flash tell you anything about top strap cutting?


PDA






Buck13
December 6, 2012, 02:15 PM
Are the gasses from bright-flashing powders any different in temperature than low-flash powders? Naively, I'd guess from the flash descriptions that Power Pistol would be spraying the top strap with hotter gas than #7. Is there any truth to that, and would it matter for wear on a revolver frame?

If you enjoyed reading about "Does muzzle/gap flash tell you anything about top strap cutting?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
627PCFan
December 6, 2012, 02:49 PM
Its not the heat of the gas so much as it is the pressure of the gas escaping the gap. Also some believe that ball powder blasting contributes some if not more to the erosion than the temperature.

Guillermo
December 6, 2012, 03:24 PM
a 627 mentioned, it is a "sandblasting" effect that damages topstraps.

It seems like beaded powders are worse offenders. My theory is because of the greater mass as compared to smaller extrusions.

Obviously the more unburned or partially burned powders, the greater the effect. This is why folks, when loading hotter ammo, report more damage. They mistakenly think that it is because of more gasses when, in fact, it is more "sand" in the "blast".

Buck13
December 6, 2012, 05:50 PM
Thanks. I have an old Colt that I want to treat gently. Photos and provenance here:

http://www.theliberalgunclub.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=13443

rcmodel
December 6, 2012, 05:57 PM
That gun should be fed a steady diet of 148 grain wad-cutter mid-range match, or standard pressure 158 grain lead bullet ammo.

If you use either, there will be no top-strap cutting, ever.

It is too old to be +P rated, and that is where you get ammo with a lot more ball powder, and flash.

rc

Buck13
December 6, 2012, 07:00 PM
Read the fine print, sir. :) It's not a .38 Special!

I'm brewing up my first batches of hand-loads right now (got as far as priming last night). Trying 90 gr. lead .314 Hornady SWC and 100 gr. plated Rainier .312 RNFP over 3.7 gr. of Unique. I might make some of them with 3.2 gr. of powder.

The 0.3 cc dipper that came with the dies throws only 2.7 gr. with Unique, which I'm concerned might be too light.

rcmodel
December 6, 2012, 09:20 PM
Read the fine print, sir.I read your post again, and still see no mention of what caliber it is.

Bad enough to have go to another gun forum to see a picture of it to find out what your post was about.

Then you expect me to read the thread over there to find out what caliber it is too??

Regardless of what caliber it is, use standard pressure loads with lead bullets and Bullseye or similar powder like the gun was made for, and you will get no top strap bead blasting, flame cutting, molecule displacement, particle beam distortion, flux capacitor flatulence, and it won't even mess your hair up.

rc

The Lone Haranguer
December 6, 2012, 09:30 PM
RC, the revolver is a Colt Police Positive Special in .32-20.

Trying 90 gr. lead .314 Hornady SWC and 100 gr. plated Rainier .312 RNFP over 3.7 gr. of Unique. I might make some of them with 3.2 gr. of powder.

I would be concerned about it being enough powder. :confused: Is this OK by the manual?

These mouse fart handloads ;) you're cooking up shouldn't hurt the old-timer, nor would modern factory ammo that is loaded "cowboy action" style with low pressure and a lead bullet. There used to be a high velocity, rifle-only load with a jacketed bullet; even if you could find it, this would not be what you want.

788Ham
December 7, 2012, 01:04 AM
From the looks of the bore, it doesn't appear to have been shot much, those lands and grooves look as sharp as brand new! The back strap and LFT muzzle are nothing, thats a very nice piece!! Congratulations.

Buck13
December 7, 2012, 02:37 AM
The Alliant website's only Unique load shows 3.5 gr. with a 98 gr. bullet. I was given similar advice in the reloading section here.
http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=8460523&postcount=13

The table included by Lee with the dies recommends 3.1 grains to start with a 98 gr. bullet, which they say corresponds to 0.34 cc on their Perfect measure, or the 0.3 cc dipper. My scale says the dipper throws 2.7 gr. Unique, which matches the results in several discussion forums if you search for "Lee dipper Unique." I made a couple of dippers from casings that throw 3.1 or 3.6 gr, each +/- 0.1 gr. People recommending 4.0 to 4.5 grains are like a rash all over the Internet, so I'm feeling fairly safe with my home-made measures.

Remllez
December 7, 2012, 12:12 PM
For the most part no matter the caliber.......flame cutting, flux capacitor flatulence etc. is usually self limiting. It will take a longtime for a 32.20 to cut the top strap deep enough to cause concern...just stay away from the rifle rounds and you'll be fine.

Buck13
December 7, 2012, 02:09 PM
There used to be a high velocity, rifle-only load with a jacketed bullet; even if you could find it, this would not be what you want.

They're ba-a-a-ack! (Does anyone even remember that reference??) Freshly minted and ready to ship today:
http://www.venturamunitions.com/load-x-32-20-winchester-100gr-jhp-hi-speed-ammo-50-rounds/
Using these in any revolver, except *maybe* a new Ruger?, would seem like a very bad idea.

These are the cheapest factory ammo I found, and shot nicely for me. Clean-burning, too.
http://www.venturamunitions.com/hsm-32-20-winchester-115gr-rnfp-h-ammo-50-rounds/

Buck13
December 7, 2012, 02:10 PM
flux capacitor flatulence

:lol:

If you enjoyed reading about "Does muzzle/gap flash tell you anything about top strap cutting?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!