would anyone ever conceal carry a cap and ball revolver?


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jason41987
December 7, 2012, 09:05 PM
ive been seeing some projects of peoples involving cutting down and shortening cap and ball revolvers, and bobbing the grips, sometimes removing the sight... making what they call a "belly gun" or a hideout gun i guess they were called... so i wonder if anyone would ever actually carry one concealed... if so, why? and what make/model and configuration would you go with?... im assuming though these belly gun mods are just for show and tell?

ive known people to carry single action cartridge revolvers like the colt SAA and remington 1875.. and i guess these revolvers would actually be slower to reload than changing cylinders on a '58... never thought about it, and if i was going with a single action id still probably go with one of the top two. but just curious if anyones ever use cap'n'ball in that manner?

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Busyhands94
December 7, 2012, 09:26 PM
I carry one when I'm fishing, a Remington with an 8" barrel holstered in my jacket. Or my Super Companion. I don't feel unarmed at all, not the slightest bit.

jason41987
December 7, 2012, 09:34 PM
i like cap and ball for fishing and camping as well.. its going to sound odd i say this, but its for the survivalist aspect of it... i know how to find the chemicals in nature needed to make gunpowder :D

Fiv3r
December 7, 2012, 10:42 PM
I sometimes carry my 8" '58 in an uncle mike shoulder holster. Sure, I've got more modern "reliable" guns, but I just like the cap and ball sometimes.
I carried the '58 for the better part of 2 months every day in the swampy regions under my arm. Took it out to the range: Bangx6.
Is it something i want to try and reload? No. Is it the "safest" bet give the other guns I have? Noy really. Do I feel more than confident being behind the trigger of that hunk o' hog leg? Oh yeah. I have never felt underguned.

bubba15301
December 7, 2012, 10:49 PM
i have carried an 1862 pietta 5 1/2 in barrel

Busyhands94
December 7, 2012, 11:43 PM
Any bad guy NOT on drugs it going to run the other direction when you draw that 8" barreled .44, that's obviously a big fat equalizer. No bad guy is going to laugh at you for shooting them with a New Model Army.

jason41987
December 8, 2012, 12:43 AM
my question was about concealed carry though... has anyone ever done that?

rodwha
December 8, 2012, 01:00 AM
Highly unlikely as most anybody legally able to carry would choose something modern that may be more reliable and easier to reload.

Jim, West PA
December 8, 2012, 01:09 AM
Not yet. But i plan to carry my 5.5" '58 .44 when i git 'round to findin the right rig.I'll even swap out for my 5.5 stainless ROA.
Heck, why not ?
If i ever have to use it and miss, the smoke will cover my git away 175912

rodwha
December 8, 2012, 01:12 AM
"If i ever have to use it and miss, the smoke will cover my git away "

Most certainly! Unless it is a small pocket pistol. You may need to fire off a few for the smoke screen!

Busyhands94
December 8, 2012, 02:19 AM
Rodwa, you'd be surprised. Even a .22 short loaded with Holy black puts out a cloud of smoke equal to the amount of smoke you'd get from a regular sized toke from a pipe or cigar.

Now... put 9 rounds of BP loaded .22LR into an H&R 9-22, shoot all that ammo double action... you'd be having trouble seeing your target halfway through the cylinder! Been there, done that, too much fun! :D


Here's a comparison I did between a New Model Army and a .38 Special with Winchester White box fired from a M&P Smith and Wesson. I used 130 somethin' grain FMJ flat tipped bullets at about 750 FPS for the video. For the Remington I used a full chamber of Goex and a ball.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OukAS0Gk8BA&list=UUQyanVLLSkwkvmZgcO3jrww&index=1

barneyrw
December 8, 2012, 02:24 AM
Anyone who thinks he has a real need to carry a concealed handgun wouldn't even consider it unless that's all they own.

TheReiver
December 8, 2012, 02:28 AM
I've heard of people doing this, but personally I wouldn't carry one for defense unless that was literally all I had. A cap and ball pistol would beat the hell out of a karate chop but I seriously doubt that a million years of practice would allow me to reload one as fast as I can slap another mag into my Glock. I would think that precipitation would be a much bigger issue also......

Busyhands94
December 8, 2012, 02:37 AM
Not if you seal your caps. I have fired cap and ball revolvers underwater with sealed caps. Light charges and incredibly strong handguns were used.

VA27
December 8, 2012, 02:40 AM
I haven't, but I wouldn't be afraid to if it was all I had.

TheReiver
December 8, 2012, 02:57 AM
Not if you seal your caps. I have fired cap and ball revolvers underwater with sealed caps. Light charges and incredibly strong handguns were used.
Hmm, I'd have been scared to pull the trigger underwater, but that's good to know about the waterproofing option.

40 rod
December 8, 2012, 03:11 AM
If i had to CC BP I'd use the Morman Avenger. A 1860 Colt minus the barrel.

jason41987
December 8, 2012, 05:02 AM
have you seen the new pepperbox pistol by EMF? uses the 1851 frame with a lengthened arbor and cylinder

BHP FAN
December 8, 2012, 08:17 AM
''would anyone ever conceal carry a cap and ball revolver?''

yes.

kBob
December 8, 2012, 08:27 AM
Brother Rockwell's revolvers were not barrel -less. but the barrels were cut back short just as the many shortened Colts you see on this board. He appearently started doing this to fit his coat pockets as early as the first Pattersons that became available. He may not have done as much "Avenging" as western mythos would have us believe, but he was the first presidency of the Church's "secret Service" and needed concealable weapons.

Changing centuries.....

......and mythos.....

Ever seen "Aliens" the second movie of that chain? The scene where the Space Marines break out all manner of off the books personal weaponry from concealment on their persons?

Around 1974 I was in a unit that provided security for the Pershing missle system system wen deployed on "Combat Alert Sites" (presurveyed, wired in launch sites) in West Germany. We guarded and patrolled with live ammunition. For political and public relations reasons at the very time contact with the Old Bader Minhof Gang and Palistinian terrorist was most likely the powers that be decided patrols out side the wire should be made without ammunition. Several of us shared a repro duction 1851 in .36 that we would conceal on our person under our field jacket on some of those patrols. If we happened to be on an patrol together there was some discussion as to who would get to carry it in fact, usually decided by who had the best skills with it, thank goodness that was me in the other guys mind when I was one of the guys together. Nope a C&B revolver is not equal to an M-16 A1 by any streatch of the imagination and an M-60 GPMG would strangle itself laughing over a comparison..... but we believed it beat being "naked" all to hell.

After being in the dark a couple of hours the muzzle flash seems remarkably bright. Really difficult to hit Jackrabbit sized targets with in the dark with those near nonexsitting sites I understand

Yeah, I have carried a concealed C&B revolver.

-kBob

Foto Joe
December 8, 2012, 10:34 AM
I think those of us who do carry as a matter of practice would think twice before taking a Black Powder revolver with us. I carry for one purpose and one purpose only, to protect myself and my loved ones in the event that the unthinkable happens. I have no illusions about whether or not I can hit what I'm aiming at with an 1860 Sheriff model or that it will go off when I pull that trigger, even though that 140gr round ball will flatten out to the size of a quarter when it strikes a target there are just too many variables in self defense.

You don't want to look back in hindsight and realize that "if" you had been carrying a 1911 instead of an 1860 the body of your wife or child just might not be laying where it is now. Self defense is deadly serious business and few in real life have ever cleared leather in that pursuit, I have and I hope never to have to do it again. Re-loading isn't an issue unless you're in law enforcement or you were ignorant enough to put yourself into a situation that should have been avoided, as a civilian if you find yourself in a firefight and having to re-load you are in BIG trouble.

I commonly leave Black Powder revolvers loaded at home and out where they can be easily reached but they are not my first line of defense nor should they be for anyone hoping to defend themselves. This is not a game folks, nor is it a fashion statement, it's life and death. As such it deserves the due respect that you would give the life of yourself or your loved ones. If you're going to carry a gun, concealed or not, you had better do so with the intent and mindset that one of these days you are going to kill another human being, failure is NOT an option in self defense.

Bedroom= Mossberg 500 w/pistol grip loaded with #6 shot.
Carry guns in order of size =
Bond Arms 45/.410 loaded with .410 SD rounds.
38 Special loaded with HP +P
S&W Model 39 +P
S&W 1911 +P

Sorry for the rant but this is something that I take very seriously.

Hellgate
December 8, 2012, 12:42 PM
"I've heard of people doing this, but personally I wouldn't carry one for defense unless that was literally all I had."
My sentiments. I've done it and can't say I trust the cap guns with my life unless that's all I had. I've had 3 or 4 times that I carried a loaded (carefully avoiding any oil, lube,etc. in the chambers or nipples) when upon firing the gun several months later had multiple failures to discharge. It may just be that Remington caps are no good for long term use (left loaded). Next time I will try RWS caps. I've had too many duds to rely on them. I use a carry C&B strictly for finishing deer or elk when hunting so it is not my life or death. Loaded up at the end of September and shot dry end of Oct/Nov. On my belt under a coat at times of varying weather from hot to snow.

jeepnik
December 8, 2012, 12:45 PM
As I have posted before, yep, I do.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f271/Jeepnik/GUNS/HANDGUNS12-31-07-0006.jpg

zimmerstutzen
December 8, 2012, 01:34 PM
Every yr in pa, one or two people are arrested carrying a black powder gun concealed without a permit

jason41987
December 8, 2012, 04:14 PM
thats their fault for not having a permit

BHP FAN
December 8, 2012, 06:41 PM
back when that is all I had, that is all I carried. Forty years ago, now, but I didn't feel ''naked'', or even under-armed, except in the sense that that's where my holster was.

Acorn Mush
December 8, 2012, 07:20 PM
Sorry for the rant but this is something that I take very seriously.

Foto Joe, thank you for a thought-provoking and incisive post. It did not seem to me to be a rant at all, but rather your attempt to convey to the rest of us the gravity of the subject based upon your real-world experience.

I have the misfortune to live in California. As such there is no way in Hell I would be able to attain a CCW permit since I am not, and never will be, a politician or a rock star. If this state ever decided to come out of the Dark Ages and adopt the "shall issue" CCW philosophy I would seriously consider applying for one, giving due thought and sober consideration to what you have written.

My hat is off to you, sir.

jeepnik
December 8, 2012, 07:32 PM
Acorn, it is quite possible for "regular" folks, I'm one, to obtain permits in California. The ease or difficulty varies from county to county. I suggest you check and see if your county or a nearby county has more lax issuing standards. A short move might make all the difference in the world.

YumaKid
December 8, 2012, 08:08 PM
Gents, it really depends upon your employment/financial situation. Right now would not be the most opportune time (but it sure seems like the most urgent time) to "head East"; but as things turn around, you should consider crossing the river to where permits were once fairly easy, take and pass a class that covers handgun law and shooter's rights/responsibilities and also involves some shooting to qualify as somebody who could actually enjoin the target, as opposed to a passing vehicle only remotely near your threat.

Two things of which to be aware:
1.) "...the river..." Uh, yeah... that would be the Colorado River, the one that protects we Arizonans from your state's ludicrous laws and political machinations. (Shame on us for not 86'ing Raul Grijalva; but c'mon, you guys.... Nancy Pelosi and Jerry Brown? AGAIN?????)

2.)If you read closely, you saw that the CCW permits "were once" easily obtained with only an NCIC background check and a class. Not since 2010... when law was changed and the issuance of permits ceased. Now it reads (paraphrasing): "If you're over 21 and legal to own a firearm, you're legal to conceal it"! I'm as "anti-regulation" as the next ten Tea-Party members; but that may be a little overboard.
I ONLY offer this opinion after observing the actions of a very few random people I've seen at our local shooting range.
Some people should not own guns, just as they should not own or handle most sharp objects.... nothing more dangerous than one of those 3/4" diameter pencils like we all used to use when we were in pre-school or kidnergarten; and it better not be overly-sharpened, either!
(IMHO)

Guvnor
December 8, 2012, 08:30 PM
The full size navy and army models are big, heavy guns and i can't really imagine trying to conceal one on me somewhere. But the smaller framed .31 guns like the 1849 colt or 1863 remington pocket would probably be doable. I wouldn't be as concerned with having enough stopping power (as plenty of dead people from the 19th century would attest to that) as i would about reliability issues like cap jams, etc. also not sure if i would trust leaving one loaded for long periods (like months at a time). But if you had a way to seal the caps to keep out moisture and you knew the gun ran reliably, then I could see it being suitable. I once took a 1851 navy on a camping trip just for kicks, it was fun...felt like an true old time mountain man, lol.

MCgunner
December 8, 2012, 09:15 PM
Outdoors, sure. I've carried my Supercompanion concealed before, but only a couple of times.

I carry a 9mm subcompact in a pocket usually, occasionally a Radom P64, or if I'm in a revolver mood, a particularly sweet Taurus M85SSUL. A NAA .22LR rides shotgun in my weak side pocket.

I have kept a .44 fake Navy loaded in the house when I had nothing else other than a .25ACP.

PRM
December 8, 2012, 10:19 PM
Over the last 30+ years at various times - YES. Will I ever again - YES.

I started shooting C&Bs when I was younger because it was cheap and I liked to shoot. As time passed, I upgraded to the 2nd Generation Colts, and later outfitted them with pre-ban elephant ivory. Both have seen their share of lead balls go down range. There are just some days that I feel like having my "old friends" around. They are accurate, reliable, and except for being a little slow on reloading, will do all their modern counterparts will do. Slow to reload - that's why I have two :-)

Most days, I have either a Colt PPS or S&W Model 36-1 with me. Even been known to carry a Walther at times. All said, my first love in the shooting world was black powder. Its a fondness I always keep close at hand.

Jim, West PA
December 8, 2012, 11:06 PM
I rethought this question and..........i still say ...YES.
But only in this configuration.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=172297&d=1348349736

loose noose
December 9, 2012, 12:19 AM
Sorry folks, but when I'm carrying concealed (which is allmost allways) I either carry my Springfield XD40 or or my Colt .45acp, I just don't take any chances when it comes to me or mine. Believe me I truly love shooting the holy black, and will continue to do so till death do us part. However, when it gets really hot out here like it did last summer, I carry a little TCP .380, as it beats throwing rocks.:uhoh::D

husker
December 9, 2012, 01:54 AM
If its all i had to carry I would with out worry. Im a way better shot with my coal burners. But I shoot them way way more than my 45s

Busyhands94
December 9, 2012, 01:59 AM
I carry em', I know they'll always go bang, and I know they'll stop a threat just fine if my life were in grave danger.

DurangoKid
December 9, 2012, 02:55 AM
I like my BP handguns. That said, There is an old quote about not bringing a knife to a gun fight. There could also be one about bringing a Cap & Ball pistol to a modern shoot out. You are most likely going to meet some guy in a "Hoody" firing a pistol that does not lay a cloud of smoke and fires 14 reliable rounds of expanding bullets. The slow often binding cap dropping C&B with a light lead ball that takes 3 days to kill with lead poison is no match for a modern semiauto.

BHP FAN
December 9, 2012, 03:20 AM
The ''light'' lead ball in .44, or even .36 was made from pure lead which expands pretty darn well, especially if it hits bone.The cap and ball revolver was a reliable killer in the Civil War, and in the right hands, it still would be, if it were pressed into service. An 1860 Colt .44 snubby will kill a fellow just as dead as a Tech Nine.

.22-5-40
December 9, 2012, 03:36 AM
I've thought of this too..but what if you were involved in a shooting..and the police decided to confiscate your weapon for who knows how long..after trial over?? What then is going to happen to your nice shiny revolver after sitting uncleaned?

BHP FAN
December 9, 2012, 03:54 AM
A very good point, and one I had not thought of. Still, I do have several, and if I had to ''sacrifice'' a handgun, I'd rather sacrifice a Pietta than my Inglis Hi-Power....

jason41987
December 9, 2012, 06:44 AM
exactly what bph says... if it sits in evidence that long.. doesnt matter, its a $180-$250 piece of equipment as opposed to an $1000 smith and wesson.

the only reason i would consider it is just how much better i shoot with these than anything else... im far more confident in hitting something with single action revolvers than i am with any other tool, due to the balance, handling characteristics and pointability

brushhippie
December 9, 2012, 08:33 AM
My involvement with BP revolvers is based on me being able to make what it takes to load and fire, Ive got about what it would take to buy a 1911 in ALL 5 of my BP revolvers, so you bet! although Ive changed my lifestyle a good bit and really have no need for concealing a handgun I normally just open carry.....but I dont go to town maybe twice a month.

Kaeto
December 9, 2012, 10:58 AM
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p565/kaeto3/DCP00376.jpg

I have carried this concealed.

Guvnor
December 9, 2012, 01:20 PM
Nice grip work. I bet that shoots one helluva flame out the barrel. Even if you missed a bad guy you'd probably at least give him a 2nd degree burn. :p

Kaeto
December 9, 2012, 01:51 PM
I also have a drop in cylinder for it that lets me use .45 Long Colt.

351 WINCHESTER
December 9, 2012, 02:44 PM
If that's all I had - yes. I would find a way, but I have other pistols that are much better suited for s/d of the protection of my wife, myself and others. You can rest assured that the bad guys are going to have the best they can afford or the best they can steal.

44 Dave
December 9, 2012, 03:23 PM
Not all of my concealed carry is "under coat" I often have a concealed under a blanket or jacket on the truck seat where size doesn't mater. I can hit the target a lot better with a big old six gun and I do load all 6 in my Remie.!
Dave

dickydalton
December 9, 2012, 03:40 PM
I agree, Foto Joe. My choice of defensive arms is a little different but concealed carry has no BP guns.

scrat
December 9, 2012, 04:21 PM
I would carry my 1858. with reserve cylinders. I dont think it would ever be possible to conceal carry a WALKER

arcticap
December 9, 2012, 05:08 PM
ive been seeing some projects of peoples involving cutting down and shortening cap and ball revolvers, and bobbing the grips, sometimes removing the sight... making what they call a "belly gun" or a hideout gun i guess they were called... so i wonder if anyone would ever actually carry one concealed... if so, why?

Folks seem to always relate how they like BP guns because their purchase aren't as regulated and in most cases they're not registered, so that the government can't take them away as easily.
Inherent in that line of thinking is that they can easily serve as throw away guns which would make tracing it much more difficult, especially if it were used in a shooting.
As low of an opinion that many have about carrying them for self-defense, if any good or bad guy were to actually use it, it's an easier gun to not have traced back to them. And because it may be considered to make a nearly perfect throw away gun, then perhaps that would make C&B's more desirable for concealed carry.
Why even bother with reloading it when a person could just carry 2 or 3 of them and then toss them away after use.
Since it's a crime to have possession of a firearm with the serial numbers altered or removed, then having possession of a C&B would be the best gun for a bad guy to be caught with, especially if they had no other choice of gun. That could mean less jail time.
That sounds like a good enough reason to carry one concealed. And I wouldn't want to argue with any person that was pointing one at me, especially if it was a bad guy. And knowing that it could easily be a throw away gun and not traceable, I would think that he must really mean business. If he's really willing to point a loaded C&B at me then I think that would be an especially good reason to fully cooperate with him. :)

BHP FAN
December 9, 2012, 05:30 PM
I'm not a bad guy, and these aren't throw aways...but your point is well taken.

http://i989.photobucket.com/albums/af11/hut-man/Pistolas.jpg

Kaeto
December 9, 2012, 07:07 PM
Your snubby C&B is in .36? Mine is in .44.

BHP FAN
December 9, 2012, 10:13 PM
mine is a .36, the Pietta, with a grip and frame to match my .357 Thunderer, that I bought from VTI Gunparts, and installed by me. Quite the pain to do so, as the gun was Pietta, and the grip and grip frame were Uberti, nothing lined up, and it even used slightly different screws.

Kaeto
December 9, 2012, 10:31 PM
My grip and frame came off of a Pietta 'Gold Rush Begins' model in.36. I put it on a Pietta 1860 Army I had gotten off Gunbroker that had the 3" barrel and an 8 1/2 " barrel. I'm in the process of getting another 1860 barrel cut down to 5 1/2 ". I call my 1860 "Mijolnir"

BHP FAN
December 10, 2012, 03:40 AM
Very cool. I built mine before you could generally even find bird's head's grips to put on BP revolvers.

jason41987
December 10, 2012, 05:04 AM
I would carry my 1858. with reserve cylinders. I dont think it would ever be possible to conceal carry a WALKER
anyone big enough to conceal a walker is someone im probably not going to want to mess with anyway

jason41987
December 10, 2012, 05:32 AM
question.. do those thunderer grips use the same trigger guard / front strap as the standard 1851/1873 grips?

kBob
December 10, 2012, 07:18 AM
Looking for a part on Dixie's site and noticed their lead gun on their christmas flyer is an abbreviated'51/44 with Thunderer grips.

Just thought folks might want to know.

-kBob

Kaeto
December 10, 2012, 07:25 AM
@ jason41987: Unfortunately no they don't. It's a front strap/trigger guard used only by those type grips.

@ kBob: And that gun is sold out until after the holidays. Dixie sold out of it in two days.

Desert Scorpion
December 10, 2012, 12:16 PM
I had a walker in my glove compartment for a good 8 months when I was in the states, reloading wasn't an issue as u really should only need one bullet!! Right! Plus the size of it and the smoke would scare anyone down range of it. Hell shoot the walker somewhere safe to scare them the smoke alone out of that thing will confuse them.

Logan5579
December 10, 2012, 03:36 PM
Would I conceal carry a C&B revolver? Sure, I have in the past and still do from time to time. Not in the summer months, I'm a decent sized guy but I can't conceal a five inch barrel 58 Remington without some kind of jacket or workshirt over my regular clothes. So it's fall and winter months at most and really not as often as I would like. Where I work allows me to CC if I wish to do so (actually encouraged at times as my boss likes having a CC permit holder on property), but in that situation I stick to my modern 45 auto...keeping in mind that if one is ever involved in a defensive shooting at a workplace, you don't want to have to explain why you have a blackpowder revolver on you in addition to any other questions that you will have to answer.

When I am not at work, sometimes I still pack shorty with me just because I am very comfortable with a revolver in general, actually prefer revolvers to semi-autos...different discussion...but I'm a good shot with the old single action, I've shot it enough to be confident with it. Some of the discussion on here seems to center on reliability...somebody always brings that up when talking about C&B revolvers, if you use the right components and the right loading technique you'll have no worries about reliability.

A word though, some finish gunsmithing is a good idea with these replica guns, just knowing where to smooth out certain parts and where the typical problems come from is 90% of the battle here. Caps hang on corners and jagged stuff as the cylider turns, cylinders bind (on the remmies) without sufficient lubrication because of a design flaw and a small diameter cylinder pin. If the caps you use give you periodic misfires, its time to try a different brand...I like CCI, I'll get maybe one true misfire in 1000 caps.

As far as loading technique goes, finesse is the key to that lock, a proper seal at both ends of the cylinder gives you a load that will fire when you want it to. I recently fired out two cylinders that I loaded three years ago...no hangfire, just BOOM X 12, just as if I had loaded them that day. BP shooting is an art that requires a little more thought than just stuff in the brass and pull the trigger as fast as you can. In general though I would say that there are valid points on both sides of the CC argument, but you gotta make your own decision.

crazyjennyblack
December 10, 2012, 04:18 PM
BHP FAN - where could I get revolvers like yours? Especially the one on the right? I've seen an Uberti "sheriff" model with a 3" barrel, but no bird's head grip. I'm dying to have one!:banghead:

rodwha
December 10, 2012, 04:19 PM
"anyone big enough to conceal a walker is someone im probably not going to want to mess with anyway"

I've seen a Walker that someone cut down nice and small. I can't seem to find it though. Still a little big.

BHP FAN
December 10, 2012, 04:34 PM
VTI Gunparts has the ''Thunderer'' grip frame to make one Jenny, and Dixie has one already made on the front page of their flyer....SS1249 1851 Yank Snubnose, a nice .44 for $295.00.

DurangoKid
December 10, 2012, 05:24 PM
I liked the post on how the C&B Handguns killed so many during the Civil War. The facts are these handguns were not popular weapons during the war. A very long study of handgun wounds and death was done a few years back. The average victim of a BP handgun wound lived 10 days after being shot.:uhoh:

crazyjennyblack
December 10, 2012, 05:43 PM
BHP FAN - I'm starting another thread on this bird's head stuff so as not to hijack this one....

josiewales
December 11, 2012, 03:04 PM
thats their fault for not having a permit

It's also illegal to hunt with a BP pistol in less than .50 in PA.

jason41987
December 11, 2012, 03:40 PM
It's also illegal to hunt with a BP pistol in less than .50 in PA.
so? why would that matter to me?

StrawHat
December 12, 2012, 08:56 PM
I have/had a variety of short barreled C&B revolvers, a 4" Pocket Police, a 4" 1851, a 3" 1860, and a '5" Walker. All were fun to shoot and except for the Walker, fun to carry but for other than "fun", I opt for an N frame.

JohnnyCremains
December 13, 2012, 09:38 PM
Maybe something like this?

http://i687.photobucket.com/albums/vv236/twaits/Avenging%20Angels/IMG_3477.jpg

Or how about this?

http://i687.photobucket.com/albums/vv236/twaits/Avenging%20Angels/IMG_2616.jpg

Still not enough? What about this?

http://i687.photobucket.com/albums/vv236/twaits/Avenging%20Angels/IMG_3535.jpg

rodinal220
December 14, 2012, 11:07 AM
If thats all I had access too,sure why not.Especially if you know how to set one up and do all the tweaks to make them more reliable. If they worked back in the day,they will work just fine now.
The round ball "works" far better than its paper ballistics suggest.

JN01
December 14, 2012, 09:38 PM
I liked the post on how the C&B Handguns killed so many during the Civil War. The facts are these handguns were not popular weapons during the war. A very long study of handgun wounds and death was done a few years back. The average victim of a BP handgun wound lived 10 days after being shot.

The unanswered question then is- were the wounds incapacitating?

The average soldier probably didn't want to be weighted down with one more thing to carry. Groups like Quantrill's Raiders seemed to like them.

Logan5579
December 15, 2012, 06:14 AM
The unanswered question then is- were the wounds incapacitating?

If I'm remembering correctly, I believe that Wyatt Earp said that if you wanted to put a man down in a hurry then shoot him in the gut...

MCgunner
December 15, 2012, 08:01 AM
It's my understanding, and i'm no historian, that cap and ball revolvers were the horse soldier's weapon, primarily. Would make sense to the horse soldier to arm up with multiple revolvers in holsters on his saddle.

jeepnik
December 15, 2012, 07:47 PM
I like my BP handguns. That said, There is an old quote about not bringing a knife to a gun fight. There could also be one about bringing a Cap & Ball pistol to a modern shoot out. You are most likely going to meet some guy in a "Hoody" firing a pistol that does not lay a cloud of smoke and fires 14 reliable rounds of expanding bullets. The slow often binding cap dropping C&B with a light lead ball that takes 3 days to kill with lead poison is no match for a modern semiauto.

Oh, I don't know. A LeMatt has I believe 9 shots in the cylinder and a shotgun barrel underneath. With that, you pretty match the kid from the hood's plastic fantastic, and the smoke acts as a screen allowing you to manuver and out flank your enemy.:evil:

PRM
December 15, 2012, 08:13 PM
A very long study of handgun wounds and death was done a few years back. The average victim of a BP handgun wound lived 10 days after being shot. - DurangoKid

Got any citations on this. Be interesting to see who the author was, how and from what sources the data was collected from. What documented historical gunfights I have read, seem to indicate otherwise.

BHP FAN
December 16, 2012, 11:23 PM
''Oh, I don't know. A LeMatt has I believe 9 shots in the cylinder and a shotgun barrel underneath. With that, you pretty match the kid from the hood's plastic fantastic, and the smoke acts as a screen allowing you to manuver and out flank your enemy...''

so right, Jeepnik!

wheelyfun66
December 16, 2012, 11:40 PM
Might have to.....by the time the new gun laws take effect.....:uhoh:

rondog
December 17, 2012, 04:21 AM
I wouldn't carry one, no. My limited experiences with them are not favorable. Inaccurate and the fired caps tend to jam them up. Not a type of gun I'd want to rely on. I've got a whole herd of other pistols I'd go to first.

Skinny 1950
December 17, 2012, 05:55 AM
Here in Canada the vast majority of people have no option to carry a Restricted (handgun) firearm. Unless you work out in the bush and pack such a heavy load of equipment that a rifle is a burden there is no hope of getting an ATC (Authorisation To Carry).
One possible exception is if a religious sect issued a death warrant on you because you wrote a book that was seen as blasphemy.

jeepnik
December 18, 2012, 08:26 PM
I wouldn't carry one, no. My limited experiences with them are not favorable. Inaccurate and the fired caps tend to jam them up. Not a type of gun I'd want to rely on. I've got a whole herd of other pistols I'd go to first.
Hmm, if your caps are falling off and jamming the cylinder, you must be doing something wrong. I give them a little pinch before putting them on the nipples. Can't say I've ever had one fall off and jam the works.

CharlesK80
December 18, 2012, 11:06 PM
Busyhands, please tell us details about shooting BP guns under water.

damoc
December 19, 2012, 12:26 AM
Hmm, if your caps are falling off and jamming the cylinder, you must be doing something wrong. I give them a little pinch before putting them on the nipples. Can't say I've ever had one fall off and jam the works.
doing something wrong OR shooting a colt repro


LOL

rondog
December 19, 2012, 02:14 AM
Hmm, if your caps are falling off and jamming the cylinder, you must be doing something wrong. I give them a little pinch before putting them on the nipples. Can't say I've ever had one fall off and jam the works.


When the caps fire they don't just pop like a primer, they shatter and splinter into little brass shards, and those are what jams things up. Are you saying you've never had a fired cap cause a problem? I'm not talking about unfired caps falling off.

damoc
December 19, 2012, 09:53 AM
When the caps fire they don't just pop like a primer, they shatter and splinter into little brass shards, and those are what jams things up. Are you saying you've never had a fired cap cause a problem? I'm not talking about unfired caps falling off.
yep have caps jam all the time with the colts but never with the remington 58
the 58 seems a much better design for staying free from cap jams

jeepnik
December 19, 2012, 08:25 PM
doing something wrong OR shooting a colt repro


LOL
By Colt repro, are you including Pietta 1860 Army models. Look at the shorty photo I posted and note it is a Pietta 1860 Army, and I've had no problems with caps "falling" off.

BHP FAN
December 22, 2012, 03:52 PM
get the right size caps, and/or switch to Treso nipples.

Jaymo
December 22, 2012, 05:23 PM
^ This. The ignition system is not the problem. The factory nipples and ill-fitting caps are.

f4t9r
December 22, 2012, 05:48 PM
I have never done that and have never considered it, until I read this post. Not going to happen for me. I want shots to be able to come one after the other if needed

raa-7
December 25, 2012, 08:25 AM
Got any citations on this. Be interesting to see who the author was, how and from what sources the data was collected from. What documented historical gunfights I have read, seem to indicate otherwise.
The study with someone living for 10 days after a wound from a BP shot :eek: :p Maybe whoever did the rese:parch or whatever was:p a terible shot :p I would definatly carry a bp revolver if it was that time period but not these days.

44 Dave
December 25, 2012, 03:29 PM
The post "brass caps" is in response to the fact that the caps split and fall in the way of the hammer on my 1860 colt my Rem seems to keep them more out of the way.
The fired brass caps need to be pulled off the nipples.

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