New to Hunting


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lpsharp88
December 7, 2012, 09:06 PM
Hi all,
I have several questions, but first, a little background. I have never been hunting before, but am going for the first time, in a week or two (going with my uncle and cousin, but have hunted quite a bit). We are going rabbit hunting, but I'd also like to try deer, and coyote. I have 2 rifles (AR-15 and Mosin), Mossberg 590A1 12ga, Glock 23, and Springfield 1911. Other than that, I don't have a whole lot that could be considered useful for hunting (I think).
Now, to the questions. First, are the weapons listed (minus the pistols of course), suitable for the hunting I'm wanting to do? I know the Mossy is smooth bore and doesn't have a choke, so rifled slugs should be used. What other equipment should I invest in? Like, would a blind work for deer and coyote hunting? What about game calls? Would some binos be a good idea? If so, what kind are affordable and still acceptable quality? Does camo really help a great deal when hunting? Any other tips/techniques or whatever are more than welcome.
I'll be hunting in Ohio and Kentucky, if that helps anything.
Thanks a lot!

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matrem
December 7, 2012, 09:22 PM
In Ohio:
The Mossberg is suitable and legal for the rabbits and deer. The 1911 is also legal for deer if it's a government model.

All you mentioned are suitable and legal for yotes.
Be safe & have fun.

lpsharp88
December 7, 2012, 09:29 PM
The way I read (I could be wrong) was that the shotgun can't be capable of holding more than 3 shells, and if it can, it must be modified in a way so that it is unable to hold more than 3 shells, and that for that to be legal, you can't be able to modify it without breaking apart the shotgun.

matrem
December 7, 2012, 09:43 PM
Yep.
Most shotguns are capable of holding four or five in the tube, so "plugs" are required to deer hunt.
Most of the manufacturers send a "fourish" inch piece of plastic with their gun, and if you don't have one, one can be easily made with dowell rod.
Just make sure that no more than two shells can fit in the tube.

lpsharp88
December 7, 2012, 09:46 PM
Thanks for all the help! What about the rest of the post?

sleepyone
December 7, 2012, 09:49 PM
Welcome to hunting! That is a lot to cover. Are your uncle and cousin familiar with the land where you will be hunting? If so, follow their lead if they indeed know what they are doing. In other words, don't bring a pop-up blind if they do stalk hunting. Different calls work at different times of the season. I don't know when the rut is in OH/KY, but where I hunt in TX the rut is done. I'm not going to waste my time trying to rattle or call a buck in right now unless we have a late-season rut. They are lazy right now and back to their routine of eating and sleeping; not moving a whole bunch. Camo is not really necessary if you will be stand hunting. In my opinion, you don't want to start erecting large new structures like stands and feeders in the middle of deer season. It takes time for deer to get used to them. If there is not an established stand and feeder, find their trails and other signs of activity and camp out against a tree or behind some brush. In that case, you will want to wear plenty of camo. Deer are color-blind, but they have excellent eye sight, hearing and smell. Patience is the most important thing you will need. If you want to still hunt, don't bounce from spot to spot. You might miss deer that come by after you leave and if you make too much of a racket all the deer will hunker down or leave the area. Stalk hunting is very time consuming and tedious work if you have a lot of trees, leaves and twigs on the ground and brush to walk through. It could take you a couple of hours to cover 200 yards if you do it right. You want to be as silent and invisible as you can. Binos are essential unless you are in a stand waiting for them to come to you. They are still valuable in a stand so you can tell a button buck from a doe and properly age a large buck. Good binos can be had for under $200 IMHO. Great binos for $300. I don't know too much about Nagants or shotguns for deer hunting. I am a bolt action guy. More specifically a Winchester Model 70 .270 guy. I am also a strong believer in carrying a sidearm when hunting if state law allows for one. I used my S&W 686 Plus .357 Mag to take a 100lb hog from 8 yards that run up on me when I was changing the clock on my feeder at dusk. Either your Glock 23 or 1911 are great for that. Hope this helps.

sleepyone
December 7, 2012, 09:55 PM
Also, if you are their guest and they are experienced hunters, watch and learn and make sure you bring EXACTLY what they tell you and bring extra if you are not certain. I'm talking food, drink (not alcohol), supplies such as scent killer, skinning knife, ammo, deer corn etc... Most hunters are very passionate and having an unprepared and/or unteachable guest can ruin a hunting experience for you and them!

1911 guy
December 8, 2012, 12:08 AM
The shotgun will work just fine for deer and rabbits. Plug the magazine with a dowel so it accept no more than two in the mag and one in the chanber. This is also mandatory for waterfowl, I think, but not required for any other game here in Ohio. You are correct in thinking that traditional rifled slugs are the correct loading for a smoothbore.

For coyotes and other varmints, like groundhogs, anything you own will be legal, but the rifles will be more suitable. Keep in mind that you can't hunt anything but deer during deer shotgun season.

I wouldn't dump too much money into equipment yet. I'd pay close attention to what they ask you to bring on your first trip and stick to that, plus any comfort items you want to take. Save the equipment purchases for later when you know (or not) that you'll continue hunting and are able to make informed decisions about how to spend the cash.

Camo helps in certain situations, such as turkey hunting or bowhunting deer, but is not legal when gun hunting deer. You'll need to wear hunter orange then. Calls aren't something you'll want to buy and use right away. They take a certain amount of finess to sound right, unless you spring for electronic calls. But they usually cost significantly more than mouthblown or hand operated calls. The best scents are cover scents. And not using perfumed soap to wash your hunting clothes. Don't laugh. Most laundry soaps are scented.

There's a ton of collective knowlege on this board and in this sub-forum. Start reading and quite a few of us are willing to answer PM's or other questions you might have and post in more threads.

lpsharp88
December 8, 2012, 02:52 PM
Thanks for all of the input! I didn't plan to purchase anything other than what I'd need for my first trip. I was just curious about stuff like how to hunt (stand vs blind vs stalk etc) and all that. I'm going to pick their brains as much as I can.

sleepyone
December 8, 2012, 07:16 PM
Hope you have a great time and that you learn a lot from your "guides!" Let us know how it goes.

kscharlie
December 8, 2012, 07:45 PM
From the Ohio Department of Natural Resources website:

"To Purchase a Hunting License

You must do one of the following:

present a previously held hunting license, or

present evidence of having successfully completed a hunter education course (from any state), or

swear that you are 21 years of age or older and have previously held a legal hunting license (from any state). "

So if you haven't already done so, you will have to attend a hunter education class in your state before you will be able to hunt. As a former hunter safety instructor in the state of Illinois, I cannot stress the need for education too much.

http://www.ohiodnr.com/wildlife/dow/regulations/hunting_general.aspx

lpsharp88
December 8, 2012, 07:59 PM
This is also from the Ohio DNR website, and plan to utilize this: "Residents and non-residents may purchase an Apprentice Hunting License or Fur Taker Permit without having taken a hunter or fur taker education course. Apprentice Hunting License or Fur Taker Permit holders MUST be accompanied by a licensed hunter or fur taker age 21 or older"
For reference http://ohiodnr.com/wildlife/dow/regulations/apprentice.aspx

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